Loan

Credit News

Remote Windows Desktop Management and Desktop Administration Software – ManageEngine Desktop Central #windows #desktop #management #software, #remote #windows #desktop #administration #software, #configuring #windows #desktops, #remote #windows #desktop #configuration, #desktop #management, #windows #patch #management, #install #patches, #inventory #management, #software #inventory, #hardware #inventory, #install #software, #software #deployment, #software #distribution, #software #installation, #service #pack #installation, #install #service #packs, #remote #desktop #sharing, #share #desktops, #active #directory #reports, #user #logon #reports, #windows #system #tools, #disk #cleanup, #check #disk, #disk #defragmentor, #disk #defrag, #windows #2000, #xp, #2003, #vista, #lan, #wan, #branch #offices


#

Features

Integration with other ManageEngine products

ServiceDesk Plus is a web-based Help Desk software, offered by ManageEngine. By integrating Desktop Central with ServiceDesk Plus, it enhances the value of your IT services. This integration let’s you to perform entire desktop and mobile device management activities within a single console.

ServiceDesk Plus On-Demand is a cloud-based help desk software offered by ManageEngine. By integrating Desktop Central with ServiceDesk Plus On-Demand, it enables you to combine your regular desktop and mobile device management activities in a simple and secure manner with SaaS based help desk management.

OS Deployer, helps to create a master image of the OS and deploy them to desktops and servers from a central location. By integrating with Desktop Central, new computers will automatically become the part of the managed computers without requiring any additional configurations

Asset Explorer is an asset management software. By integrating with Desktop Central, you can fetch accurate inventory details of all the hardware, software assets in your organization.

Integration with other products

ServiceNow is a leading web-based help desk solutions that helps in modern IT service management. Integrate Desktop Central with ServiceNow, to experience improved incident handling. This integration helps you to perform Desktop Central’s service operation tasks directly from ServiceNow Console.

Spiceworks is a help desk software that can be hosted both On-premises and On-cloud. Desktop Central’s integration with Spiceworks allows you to perform desktop management activities on Spiceworks console with a single sign on.

Customer Success Stories

We had a general lack of resource and found Software deployment and desktop management to be very time consuming. Desktop central has managed to greatly simplify this process. Deploying Desktop Central was really quick and easy. It was competitively priced, and we found it to be the simplest and most effective desktop management tool that we have ever used.

System Support Manager, Plan UK


Ask the Expert: Does mortgage insurance make sense? Dec. 19, 2003 #military #loan


#loan insurance
#

By Walter Updegrave, CNN/Money contributing columnist

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) – I am being offered mortgage protection insurance. Is it worth the cost?

— James Lawrence, Tampa, Florida

Before I answer your question, let’s be sure we’re both talking about the same type of mortgage insurance. There are actually two kinds, and they provide very different types of coverage.

First, there is the type known as private mortgage insurance, or PMI as it’s known in lending circles.

If you are buying a home and putting up a downpayment of less than 20 percent of the home’s value, then generally you don’t have a choice of whether to buy this type of insurance. The lender requires it.

Why? Because PMI isn’t there to protect you — it’s there to protect the insurer in the event you default on your home loan and the lender isn’t able to re-sell your home for enough money to pay off the mortgage.

The cost of PMI varies, but a rule of thumb is about one half of one percent of the loan amount.

So if you’re buying a house for, say, $150,000 and putting 10 percent down ($15,000), the annual cost of PMI on your $135,000 mortgage might run $675 a year, or $56.25 a month.

In years past, some lenders would continue to collect PMI premiums even after the mortgage balance had fallen to well below 80 percent of the home’s original value. But Congress passed the Homeowners Protection Act of 1998, which allows homeowners to request that the lender cancel PMI when the mortgage loan-to-value ratio falls to 80 percent and requires the lender to cancel it when the ratio falls to 78 percent.

By the way, appreciation in the home’s value isn’t taken into account in calculating this ratio — only the decline in the mortgage balance counts.

There are also some other qualifications that may affect your ability to cancel PMI. For more on what the bill requires of you and the lender, click here.

Mortgage life insurance

The second type of mortgage insurance is the type that usually goes by the name mortgage life insurance.

Here, you’re being offered the chance to buy an insurance policy that will repay your mortgage in the event of your death, disability or some incapacitating disease.

This offer — typically by mail — often comes from your lender or an insurance company affiliated with that lender.

This type of insurance is purely voluntary, however, so the question is, should you buy?

Generally, I’d say the answer is no.

It rarely makes sense to buy insurance for narrow reasons — to insure against a specific disease or a single calamity or to provide funds to pay off a single liability, in this case your mortgage.

In the case of life insurance, for example, you’re much better off analyzing your overall insurance need based on what kind of liabilities your spouse or other dependents would face and how much income they would have to replace if you were gone, and then buying enough insurance to meet that need.

Fact is, if you died tomorrow, your dependents would need to replace your income for a variety of reasons, not just to pay the mortgage.

Indeed, it might not even make sense to pay off the mortgage. Your spouse or other survivors might be better off continuing to pay the loan — assuming that’s possible — and putting insurance proceeds to other purposes.

In other words, you should take your overall financial picture into account when buying life insurance.

And the way you should do that is to have a financial planner or life insurance agent perform what’s known as a “needs analysis.” You can also use any one of a number of insurance needs calculators online, including the calculators at The Life and Health Insurance Foundation for Education site and TIAA-Cref site.

Of course, that leaves the question of what type of insurance you should buy — whole life, term, etc. — and the issue of how to shop for the best price for a policy.

For more on those topics, see a column I wrote last year called “Life insurance made easy .”

The same goes for disability insurance. You should consider a long-term disability insurance policy not just because you have an outstanding mortgage, but because you would likely need to generate income for a variety of reasons even if you were disabled and unable to work. For more on choosing a disability policy, click here.


Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services – DUI – Alcohol and Drug Substance Abuse Courses (ADSAC) #oklahoma #department #of #mental #health #and #substance #abuse #services,adsac,you,522,must,your,license,hour,drug,alcohol,assessment,1,offenders,10,revocation,substance,abuse,certificate,title,those,dui,chapter,program,july,2003


#

For Oklahomans who have had their driver s license revoked or suspended, care has been taken to assure that you will be properly assessed in order to provide the most meaningful level of intervention for your individualized situation.

Once your assessment has been completed, a referral will be made to the appropriate intervention. The referral environment is an opportunity to review your current (and past) drinking and/or drug using behaviors, relating to your driving privilege. This allows you to decide if there are problems and determine any corrections that may need to be made. Levels of intervention range on a continuum from a 10 hour DUI school (called an ADSAC course) and Victims Impact Panel to Residential Treatment, including aftercare.

For those offenders receiving an alcohol or drug related license revocation on or before June 30, 2003 you must complete an ADSAC assessment and contact DPS to determine what recommendations you must follow.

  • If you have attended an alcohol and drug treatment program from an agency CERTIFIED BY ODMHSAS and want to submit treatment for consideration, please download the ADSAC cover form on this web site and either mail or fax it to the address listed with a copy of your completion certificate.
  • We strongly encourage you to not drop the form and certificates in person as we cannot guarantee that someone will be available to meet with you. If there is a need to discuss the information in person, an appointment can be made with Tammy Anderson, by calling (405) 248-9027.
  • Your certificate must state the length of time of the program and level of intensity of your program, examples: 10-hour school; outpatient counseling; residential treatment. If this information is not on the certificate, you must get a letter stating this information and attach it to the certificate.

For those offenders receiving an alcohol and drug related license revocation on or after July 1, 2003, you must obtain an ADSAC assessment and complete all recommendations identified by the assessment that are required for license reinstatement.

Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services (ODMHSAS) works in close connection with Department of Public Safety (DPS) to implement and set forth standards and criteria, contained in DPS statute: Title 47 Chapter 6-212.2, for persons needing alcohol and drug assessments and evaluation related to driver s license revocation or suspension. ODMHSAS administrative rules are contained in Title 450 Chapter 22, Certification of Alcohol and Drug Assessment and Evaluations Related to Driver s License Revocation, effective September 1, 2016 and Title 450, Chapter 21, Certification of Alcohol and Drug Substance Abuse Courses (ADSAC), Organizations and Instructors, effective September 1, 2016.

For more information contact:
Tammy Anderson
ODMHSAS ADSAC Programs

(405) 248-9027
(405) 248-9324 Fax

Resources

Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services
1200 NE 13th Street, PO Box 53277
Oklahoma City, OK 73152-3277
405-522-3908 | 405-522-3851 TDD | 405-522-3650 Fax | Toll-Free, 24 Hours 1-800-522-9054
Notice of Privacy Practices
to report a problem with this web page click here

Last Modified on 05/24/2017

2017 The State of Oklahoma


Ask the Expert: Does mortgage insurance make sense? Dec. 19, 2003 #medical #loans


#loan insurance
#

By Walter Updegrave, CNN/Money contributing columnist

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) – I am being offered mortgage protection insurance. Is it worth the cost?

— James Lawrence, Tampa, Florida

Before I answer your question, let’s be sure we’re both talking about the same type of mortgage insurance. There are actually two kinds, and they provide very different types of coverage.

First, there is the type known as private mortgage insurance, or PMI as it’s known in lending circles.

If you are buying a home and putting up a downpayment of less than 20 percent of the home’s value, then generally you don’t have a choice of whether to buy this type of insurance. The lender requires it.

Why? Because PMI isn’t there to protect you — it’s there to protect the insurer in the event you default on your home loan and the lender isn’t able to re-sell your home for enough money to pay off the mortgage.

The cost of PMI varies, but a rule of thumb is about one half of one percent of the loan amount.

So if you’re buying a house for, say, $150,000 and putting 10 percent down ($15,000), the annual cost of PMI on your $135,000 mortgage might run $675 a year, or $56.25 a month.

In years past, some lenders would continue to collect PMI premiums even after the mortgage balance had fallen to well below 80 percent of the home’s original value. But Congress passed the Homeowners Protection Act of 1998, which allows homeowners to request that the lender cancel PMI when the mortgage loan-to-value ratio falls to 80 percent and requires the lender to cancel it when the ratio falls to 78 percent.

By the way, appreciation in the home’s value isn’t taken into account in calculating this ratio — only the decline in the mortgage balance counts.

There are also some other qualifications that may affect your ability to cancel PMI. For more on what the bill requires of you and the lender, click here.

Mortgage life insurance

The second type of mortgage insurance is the type that usually goes by the name mortgage life insurance.

Here, you’re being offered the chance to buy an insurance policy that will repay your mortgage in the event of your death, disability or some incapacitating disease.

This offer — typically by mail — often comes from your lender or an insurance company affiliated with that lender.

This type of insurance is purely voluntary, however, so the question is, should you buy?

Generally, I’d say the answer is no.

It rarely makes sense to buy insurance for narrow reasons — to insure against a specific disease or a single calamity or to provide funds to pay off a single liability, in this case your mortgage.

In the case of life insurance, for example, you’re much better off analyzing your overall insurance need based on what kind of liabilities your spouse or other dependents would face and how much income they would have to replace if you were gone, and then buying enough insurance to meet that need.

Fact is, if you died tomorrow, your dependents would need to replace your income for a variety of reasons, not just to pay the mortgage.

Indeed, it might not even make sense to pay off the mortgage. Your spouse or other survivors might be better off continuing to pay the loan — assuming that’s possible — and putting insurance proceeds to other purposes.

In other words, you should take your overall financial picture into account when buying life insurance.

And the way you should do that is to have a financial planner or life insurance agent perform what’s known as a “needs analysis.” You can also use any one of a number of insurance needs calculators online, including the calculators at The Life and Health Insurance Foundation for Education site and TIAA-Cref site.

Of course, that leaves the question of what type of insurance you should buy — whole life, term, etc. — and the issue of how to shop for the best price for a policy.

For more on those topics, see a column I wrote last year called “Life insurance made easy .”

The same goes for disability insurance. You should consider a long-term disability insurance policy not just because you have an outstanding mortgage, but because you would likely need to generate income for a variety of reasons even if you were disabled and unable to work. For more on choosing a disability policy, click here.


Ask the Expert: Does mortgage insurance make sense? Dec. 19, 2003 #best #loan #rate


#loan insurance
#

By Walter Updegrave, CNN/Money contributing columnist

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) – I am being offered mortgage protection insurance. Is it worth the cost?

— James Lawrence, Tampa, Florida

Before I answer your question, let’s be sure we’re both talking about the same type of mortgage insurance. There are actually two kinds, and they provide very different types of coverage.

First, there is the type known as private mortgage insurance, or PMI as it’s known in lending circles.

If you are buying a home and putting up a downpayment of less than 20 percent of the home’s value, then generally you don’t have a choice of whether to buy this type of insurance. The lender requires it.

Why? Because PMI isn’t there to protect you — it’s there to protect the insurer in the event you default on your home loan and the lender isn’t able to re-sell your home for enough money to pay off the mortgage.

The cost of PMI varies, but a rule of thumb is about one half of one percent of the loan amount.

So if you’re buying a house for, say, $150,000 and putting 10 percent down ($15,000), the annual cost of PMI on your $135,000 mortgage might run $675 a year, or $56.25 a month.

In years past, some lenders would continue to collect PMI premiums even after the mortgage balance had fallen to well below 80 percent of the home’s original value. But Congress passed the Homeowners Protection Act of 1998, which allows homeowners to request that the lender cancel PMI when the mortgage loan-to-value ratio falls to 80 percent and requires the lender to cancel it when the ratio falls to 78 percent.

By the way, appreciation in the home’s value isn’t taken into account in calculating this ratio — only the decline in the mortgage balance counts.

There are also some other qualifications that may affect your ability to cancel PMI. For more on what the bill requires of you and the lender, click here.

Mortgage life insurance

The second type of mortgage insurance is the type that usually goes by the name mortgage life insurance.

Here, you’re being offered the chance to buy an insurance policy that will repay your mortgage in the event of your death, disability or some incapacitating disease.

This offer — typically by mail — often comes from your lender or an insurance company affiliated with that lender.

This type of insurance is purely voluntary, however, so the question is, should you buy?

Generally, I’d say the answer is no.

It rarely makes sense to buy insurance for narrow reasons — to insure against a specific disease or a single calamity or to provide funds to pay off a single liability, in this case your mortgage.

In the case of life insurance, for example, you’re much better off analyzing your overall insurance need based on what kind of liabilities your spouse or other dependents would face and how much income they would have to replace if you were gone, and then buying enough insurance to meet that need.

Fact is, if you died tomorrow, your dependents would need to replace your income for a variety of reasons, not just to pay the mortgage.

Indeed, it might not even make sense to pay off the mortgage. Your spouse or other survivors might be better off continuing to pay the loan — assuming that’s possible — and putting insurance proceeds to other purposes.

In other words, you should take your overall financial picture into account when buying life insurance.

And the way you should do that is to have a financial planner or life insurance agent perform what’s known as a “needs analysis.” You can also use any one of a number of insurance needs calculators online, including the calculators at The Life and Health Insurance Foundation for Education site and TIAA-Cref site.

Of course, that leaves the question of what type of insurance you should buy — whole life, term, etc. — and the issue of how to shop for the best price for a policy.

For more on those topics, see a column I wrote last year called “Life insurance made easy .”

The same goes for disability insurance. You should consider a long-term disability insurance policy not just because you have an outstanding mortgage, but because you would likely need to generate income for a variety of reasons even if you were disabled and unable to work. For more on choosing a disability policy, click here.