Loan

Credit News

Loans, Credit and Debt – Canadian Banks #pay #day #loan


#loans canada
#

Loans, Credit and Debt

The majority of Canadians have at least one loan. and in fact most of them have many loans. Credit and debt have become a way of life, and saving is no longer in vogue. This of course is unsustainable and resulted in the severe financial crisis we are in now.

Loans come in many forms, depending on the purpose of borrowing. For example a business in need of capital would apply for business loan. while a student can take advantage of Canada Student Loans Program to finance their education. Debt consolidation loans are a great solution for persons or businesses with several loans with high interest rate, allowing them to consolidate their debt and do refinancing at lower interest rates.

Equity Loans (home equity loans) can be obtained using your home equity as collateral for a large sum loan (think of this as a second mortgage). A home equity line of credit (HELOC) is a special kind of credit line tapping the existing equity in your home. Home owners trading up, might need a bridge financing. while arranging for permanent one. In certain cases, borrowers might want to consider getting interest only loan.

A loan can be a secured loan (car loan for example) or unsecured loan (personal credit line for example).

If you want to get a loan, then you can use various loan calculators to determine your monthly payments, by entering the loan interest. amount, and the amortization period. Another thing you can do is pull a copy of your credit report. to make sure that the information there is correct and it won’t affect your ability to get a loan. If you have less than stellar credit, it’s likely that mainstream lenders won’t be willing to give you a loan, and in this case you can apply for the so-called bad credit loans from one of the Canadian subprime lenders. If debt is overwhelming you can take advantage of credit counseling services available to borrowers in trouble.

Credit Cards are very popular credit instruments. Choosing a credit card is not always easy with so many choices available on the market. Before applying for a credit card make sure that, you have read and understood the credit card terms (check our Credit Card Tips article for more info). Be careful if you see an advertisement for a no-interest credit card (believe me there’s always a catch). If you have bad credit or no credit history you can apply for a secured credit card. from one of the Canadian banks. Learn what is a prepaid credit card (it’s not a credit card really) and if you are a heavy credit card borrower, learn how to get rid of credit card debt.

Payday loans have always been a controversial subject, and while the general opinion is that they are bad for consumers, there’s no denying that some people need them. Payday lenders make it really easy for borrowers to get a small loan, and many lenders offer payday loans online. To be able to decide for yourself if payday loans are good or bad, read what is a payday loan. how does a payday loan work. and what’s payday loans ultimate cost.


How do used car loans work? carloan banks usedcars #cheap #loan


#used car loans
#

How do used car loans work?

I have some general questions about financing a used car

My current car, a 1995 Volvo 850 with around 200,000 miles, has been giving me some trouble. First, the A/C died, which for someone who likes to keep their surroundings as cold as possible is pretty annoying. It sounds like that may simply be a relay that needs to be replaced. Second, there was a good amount of white smoking blowing out of my tailpipe this afternoon. I’m worried that it may be a headgasket or a gasket on my turbo. I’m going to see the mechanic tomorrow morning.

Assuming that repairing my 15-year-old car will cost me many hundreds if not thousands of dollars, I’ve been looking into getting a replacement. I’ve tried my best to research various used car loans online. I’ve got $2000-$2500 to use a down payment. Ideally I’d replace this car with the same exact model, only with less miles. I love my Volvo.

It seems like many lenders limit the model year they will loan money for to newer (within the last 5 or so years) models. Is this true of most lenders? Will it be tough to get a $3000-$5000 loan for a late 90s model?

If I do get a loan, am I free to purchase the car wherever I want? Private seller? Dealership? Used car lot? How does this work? Does the bank give me a blank check with the stipulation that I can only spend up to $xxxx? Do I need to tell the seller/dealership to contact my lender to receive the money?

I currently do the majority of my banking online with ING Direct. They do not offer car loans. There are several banks near me, including PNC and my employers credit union. Generally, do you need to have an account at the bank to get a loan from them?

This is a tough situation for me, as I recently graduated from college and moved away from home. I don’t have any friends who can give me rides or help me look for a car. I’d like to be prepared if I need to start the process of finding a loan and then purchasing a car.

I bank at a local credit union in the metro NY area (and have commented about using credit unions here in the past ) and recommend that route.

My credit union will only give car loans for cars 10 years or younger. Why? Because the car is collateral in case you don’t pay back the loan. If the car stop working and you cannot afford to fix it, the credit union doesn’t want to repo a busted car.

Want a car loan? Need an account. The minimum for a savings account there is $5. Get pre-approved for the loan in the amount so you know that you’ll be able to finance it when you start shopping around. You’ll have to use a bank if you buy from an individual. If you buy from a business, they will attempt to loan you the money as well. There’s tons written about financing cars at dealerships and car negotiating for you to read. Commonly, it is recommended that you do not walk in and announce that you’ve been pre-approved elsewhere or for what amount.

Huh. I was not previously aware of the limitation on model years for car loans.

Well, the issue with car loans is that they will take a security interest in your car, so the car is collateral on the loan and therefore the lender has to care about the quality/upkeep of the car (FYI, there is typically a minimum amount of comprehensive and/or collision insurance coverage required when you take out an auto loan).

One potential alternative is a line of credit or personal loan. Discover has such a product, though I’m sure there are other, similar alternatives, possibly even one at your local credit union. This is different from a credit card in that 1) the interest rate tends to be lower, and 2) the monthly payment and payment term are fixed. For a small amount such as you are planning to borrow ($3-5K), it may be entirely feasible to get a personal loan.

The upside is that they do not care at all what you spend it on, or require any particular level of insurance on your car. The downside is that the interest rate may be a couple points worse than that of a car loan, and your repayment term may well be shorter (24-36 months is common), so the monthly payments will be higher.

posted by rkent at 8:00 PM on May 25, 2010

What the others said reflects my experience too, but I will add one bit of advice.

Last time I bought a car, I arranged for financing ahead of time with my credit union. I qualified for their very best rate, which turned out to be the lowest rate among about 10 banks and credit unions I checked. I wound up buying a very slightly used car from a dealer and the manufacturer had incentive financing which was about one percent lower than that. The finance guy at the dealership somehow wound up finding financing through the dealer services department at a major national bank which was even 1% lower than the manufacturer’s deal.

The point is that you should come prepared with your own financing in place, but be open to the possibility of a better deal. Also be aware that some dealers try to simulate a better deal by giving you a lower rate but a higher overall price. For that reason, you should negotiate on the price and all other details before you even begin talking to the dealer about financing. You should also make it clear that you’re totally indifferent about the car and prepared to walk at the first sign of nonsense.


Here s how banks calculate home loan eligibility. #mortgage #interest #rates


#home loan eligibility
#

Here’s how banks calculate home loan eligibility

Updated on: July 15, 2011

T his article is aimed at clearing doubts over how a bank calculates your net income while calculating the eligibility for total home loan amount. Normally, all banks provide home loans up to 60 times your monthly net income.

  • You have a monthly in-hand (take home) salary as Rs 50,000 and you are looking for a home loan of about Rs 30 lakh.
  • Your gross monthly income might be much more than Rs 50,000 per month but that does not matter while calculating the net income.
  • You don’t have any other loan like car or personal loan on your name.
  • Bank rules say that you are eligible to get 60 times your monthly net income as loan.

Well, all sounds good till the time you are talking to your bank executive or an agent over phone for your eligibility. They ask you for your net income, you answer Rs 50,000 per month and they immediately say that you are eligible for a loan that is 60 times your monthly net income, that is, Rs 30 lakh. You are excited that everything is going as per your expectations and think you will get the amount you were looking for.

Click NEXT for more


About Bad Credit Personal Loans Banks #home #mortgage #rates


#bank loans for people with bad credit
#

Other People Are Reading

Significance

Banks consider individuals with credit scores below 620 to have poor or bad credit. Banks find out your credit score from at least one of three privately held credit reporting agencies. The credit reporting agencies are Equifax, TransUnion and Experian. Most banks offering to do business with individuals with bad credit are internet-based or local businesses that offer payday advances. Some payday advances are more like personal loans because they are renewable each payday until the borrower is able to pay in full. Of course, fees apply with each renewal.

Features

The banks offering to loan money to those with bad credit do have some basic lending requirements that individuals must meet in order to apply. The banks require the borrower to be at least 18 years old and a legal resident with a minimum verifiable income of at least $800, although some require $1,000. Banks may require the borrower to have no outstanding payday loans or an active checking account.

Size

Most banks seem willing to offer unsecured personal loans of up to $1,500 to individuals with bad credit. Common offers are loans of $500 without a credit check deposited into your checking account in 24 to 48 hours. Secured loan amounts are a percentage of the value of the collateral.

Considerations

High risk lending banks may charge loan origination fees to applicants as well as high interest rates that may be three times the average interest rates or more. If a borrower cannot pay on the due date these banks may offer to delay payments with extension fees. The terms of the loan may include prepayment penalties; these are additional fees for paying off the balance early, so read the fine print. Lenders may also offer loan insurance for an additional fee. If you are considering this option, be sure you fully understand the costs and exclusions. If the banks fees and rates are tier-based, then a loan for $2,000 may have a significantly lower interest rate than a loan for $1,999, so be sure to ask.

Warning

Once you begin searching for personal loans you may be approached by fake lenders, phony debt counselors or scam artists who may even be using real names of loan companies. Learn about the latest advance fee loan scams and identity phishers before giving anyone your personal information such as your social security number or bank information.


5 Banks Providing Cheapest Home Loans in India #sky #loans


#cheapest home loans
#

5 Banks Providing Cheapest Home Loans in India

Bangalore: Home prices may have been on an upward spiral for many years, but the cost of owning a house in India remains near the most affordable level in over three decades, showed data compiled by mortgage giant HDFC Ltd.

The average price of a home, purchased with a housing loan, rose to over 45 lakh in the 2012-13 fiscal marking the fourth consecutive year of uptrend from about 25 lakh in the year 2008-09, HDFC has said in a presentation.

Read on to know about few banks which provide cheapest home loans in India, listed by Yahoo.

Note: EMI per lakhs (in Rupees) for a loan amount of 30 lakhs as on May 3, 2013

1. Axis Bank

Axis Bank housing loans are intended for current requirements. One can choose between fixed and floating rate options based on which way you think interest rates are moving.

A loan in which the interest rate does not change during the entire term of the loan is known as a fixed rate and a floating interest rate is acknowledged as a changeable rate or adaptable rate.

Axis bank is offering 2,212 as fixed rate and 2, 149 as floating rate for a period of 5 years. Alternatively for 10 years fixed rate is 1,420 floating rate is 1,349, for 15 years fixed rate is 1,184, floating rate is 1,105 and for 20 years fixed rate is 1,084, floating rate is 998.

Also Read:


Why it – s miles cheaper to avoid the banks when buying a car. #auto #loan #rates


#cheapest car loan
#

Why it’s miles cheaper to avoid the banks when buying a car

WITH car sales falling off a cliff, there’s never been a better time to buy a car. The number of new cars sold in Ireland last year was a third the number sold in 2000, when the Celtic Tiger was alive and well. The industry is on its knees as a result – so you’ve a better chance of getting a bargain.

“It’s definitely a buyer’s market,” said Conor Faughnan, director of policy with AA Ireland. “You can push the car dealer on price, particularly if you’ve got the cash to do a deal.”

Cash of course is the cheapest way to buy a car – but not many of us have the luxury of having the cash to buy a car outright. Chances are, you’ll have to borrow to buy your dream set of wheels. Choose the wrong car finance however and you could pay as much as €6,000 more for your car than you would have, had you borrowed the money elsewhere.

You usually have two choices of car finance – a hire purchase agreement, where you pay monthly repayments for the hire of the car, or a car loan. You’ll typically be offered hire purchase if you go to a dealer; while a bank will usually offer you a loan.

The Sunday Independent examined the car finance offered by AIB, Bank of Ireland, Danske Bank, Permanent TSB and Ulster Bank as well as the hire purchase deals offered by a few dealers. We found that hire purchase can work out a lot cheaper than a loan – but only if the interest rate is lower than 9 per cent and there are no hidden charges lobbed on top of that.

BORROWING €10,000

Up to €2,350 more expensive at the bank

If borrowing €10,000 to buy a car, one of the cheapest ways to do so is through hire purchase with Renault Finance.

If you’re buying a Renault Megane (Coupe, Hatch or Grand), Renault Finance offers interest-free hire purchase of up to €11,000 as long as you pay off the money borrowed over three years – and pay a 30 per cent up-front deposit off the price of the car.

If you’re not interested in a Megane, but have another Renault in mind, you could borrow €10,000 from Renault Finance at an interest rate of 4.9 per cent under hire purchase – as long as you can stump up the 30 per cent deposit. Under that rate, the monthly repayments are €185 over five years – and the cost of your credit, including interest and fees of €150, comes to €1,250. That’s up to €2,350 cheaper than the banks.

If you’re buying from a BMW dealer, BMW Financial Services charges 7.95 per cent interest under HP if you’re borrowing €10,000. The monthly repayments over five years are €198.67, which brings the cost of your credit to €1,920 – almost half what some banks charge. You don’t have to pay a deposit to get the 7.95 per cent interest rate.

Our survey found that Bank of Ireland is the most expensive for car loans. It charges 13.6 per cent interest on a fixed-rate loan of €10,000. Under that rate, your monthly repayments over five years are €226.82 – which brings the cost of your credit to €3,609.

Bank of Ireland will knock off 1 per cent from your interest rate if you get your loan online – but even with that discount, its €10,000 car loans still work out more expensive than those offered by AIB, Danske Bank, and PTSB. Ulster Bank is the second most expensive for a €10,000 car loan. Ulster charges 12.3 per cent interest – which clocks up to €3,238 after five years.

Permanent TSB offers the cheapest €10,000 car loan. Permo charges 9.9 per cent interest, which will cost you €2,595 after five years.

Check if your bank offers hire purchase as that may work out cheaper for you than a car loan. Bank of Ireland charges 10.5 per cent interest on €10,000 borrowed under hire purchase, which brings the cost of your credit to €2,756.40 after five years – about €800 cheaper than the bank’s fixed rate loan.

BORROWING €30,000

Up to €5,731 more expensive at the bank

If buying a Renault, Renault Finance should work out a lot cheaper than your bank. It costs €3,510 to borrow €30,000 over five years under Renault’s 4.9 per cent interest rate for hire purchase – but again, you need a 30 per cent deposit to get that rate.

If you don’t have the 30 per cent deposit, you’ll be charged 6.9 per cent interest – which is still cheaper than the banks.

It costs €6,068 to borrow €30,000 over five years under BMW Financial Services’ hire purchase plan – which charges 7.95 per cent interest.

Borrow the €30,000 through Bank of Ireland’s variable loan however, and you’ll pay €9,241 in interest over five years – between €3,173 and €5,731 more than the hire purchase offers we examined. Bank of Ireland charges 11.7 per cent interest on this loan – which makes its variable loan the most expensive of the €30,000 car loans examined.

Danske Bank’s variable loan is also expensive. Danske charges 11.47 per cent on a variable loan of €30,000, which will cost you €9,054 after five years.

The cost of Permo’s €30,000 car loan, which has an interest rate of 9.3 per cent, adds up to €7,277 after five years. The hire purchase offers from Bank of Ireland and AIB worked out cheaper than Permo’s loan however.

BORROWING €60,000

Up to €6,192 more expensive at the bank

One of the cheapest ways to borrow €60,000 is through hire purchase with BMW Financial Services. You’ll pay 7.95 per cent interest on €60,000 and this will cost you €12,290 after five years. Get a €60,000 variable loan at 11.7 per cent from Bank of Ireland however, and you’ll pay €18,482 interest after five years – about €6,200 more.

Avoid Danske Bank’s variable loan – it charges 11.47 per cent interest on €60,000, which will cost you €18,107 after five years.

At 9.3 per cent interest, Permanent TSB’s car loan was the cheapest €60,000 bank loan surveyed. The cost of that loan came to €14,555 after five years.

Bank of Ireland’s hire purchase however works out cheaper than Permo’s car loan. The cost of borrowing €60,000 under Bank of Ireland’s hire purchase over five years adds up to €13,515.

LEASING

If you own your own business and you’ve no desire to own a car outright, leasing could work out cheaper for you in the short-term.

For example, it could cost you €29,560 to buy a Toyota Avensis diesel saloon. If you lease it for five years from Merrion Fleet Management, your monthly repayments come to €512.67. These repayments include the cost of maintenance such as road tax, servicing and tyres. By contrast, the monthly repayments for a €30,000 bank loan over five years range between €619 and €654 and these repayments don’t include costs such as road tax and servicing.

The cost of leasing a car will however add up over time. After five years, the monthly repayments for the lease of the Toyota Avensis add up to €30,760 – and you won’t own your car but must hand it back to the leasing company at an agreed time. As long as you meet the repayments on your car loan or hire purchase agreement, you’ll own your car.

CAVEATS

You need to understand everything about a hire purchase agreement before you sign up to it, warns Dermott Jewell of the Consumers’ Association of Ireland.

The main advantage of a loan over hire purchase is that you can sell your car to repay the loan should you fall behind on your repayments. You can’t do this with hire purchase. As a result, you’re more likely to have your car repossessed under hire purchase than a car loan. With hire purchase, you don’t own the car until the final payment is made.

“The inability to pay later has given rise to significant debts when devalued cars are repossessed, sold for small market value and leaving unmanageable balances to pay,” said Jewell.

Irish Independent

More in Business

‘Nama is playing a part in solving homelessness’ – Minister Kelly


90 Day Installment Loans Seattle WA – Green Leaf Loan Group, Seattle WA 90 Day Installment Loans, Seattle WA Retail Banks, Seattle WA Unsecured Business Loans, Seattle WA Working Capital Loans #e #loans


#90 day loans
#

90 Day Installment Loans Seattle WA

90 Day Installment Loans, Seattle, WA, Greenleafloangroup and Unsecured Business Loans

90 Day Installment Loans

Larger Loan Amounts and Time to Pay it Back

With 90 day installment loans you get larger loan amounts and time to pay it back. Our installment loans can be considered as short term installment loans or long term installment loans but either way they should be considered. Since your income is your credit there is no credit check which makes our unsecured installment loans sought out online by those with bad credit.

With 90 day installment loans you get the cash you need now and at least 90 days to pay back the loan. So, when you need a larger loan amount or more time to pay back the loan and your credit is not great then check out our featured installment loan lenders .

Everyone benefits from a larger loan and more time to repay with an unsecured installment loan. You can typically get a larger loan amount when you have more time to repay a loan. When an installment loan is unsecured then you also benefit by not having to provide any collateral for the loan. Your income and your good name is all you’ll need with our featured direct installment lenders .

Even with bad credit you can easily get an installment loan online from our direct installment lenders. When you apply for bad credit installment loans online. all you’ll need is a job and a bank account.

We provide access to short term installment loans and long term installment loans. A short term installment loan is usually for a smaller amount and takes less than 90 day to repay. Conversely, a long term installment loan is usually for a larger amount and takes more than 90 days to repay.


How do used car loans work? carloan banks usedcars #credit #loans


#used car loans
#

How do used car loans work?

I have some general questions about financing a used car

My current car, a 1995 Volvo 850 with around 200,000 miles, has been giving me some trouble. First, the A/C died, which for someone who likes to keep their surroundings as cold as possible is pretty annoying. It sounds like that may simply be a relay that needs to be replaced. Second, there was a good amount of white smoking blowing out of my tailpipe this afternoon. I’m worried that it may be a headgasket or a gasket on my turbo. I’m going to see the mechanic tomorrow morning.

Assuming that repairing my 15-year-old car will cost me many hundreds if not thousands of dollars, I’ve been looking into getting a replacement. I’ve tried my best to research various used car loans online. I’ve got $2000-$2500 to use a down payment. Ideally I’d replace this car with the same exact model, only with less miles. I love my Volvo.

It seems like many lenders limit the model year they will loan money for to newer (within the last 5 or so years) models. Is this true of most lenders? Will it be tough to get a $3000-$5000 loan for a late 90s model?

If I do get a loan, am I free to purchase the car wherever I want? Private seller? Dealership? Used car lot? How does this work? Does the bank give me a blank check with the stipulation that I can only spend up to $xxxx? Do I need to tell the seller/dealership to contact my lender to receive the money?

I currently do the majority of my banking online with ING Direct. They do not offer car loans. There are several banks near me, including PNC and my employers credit union. Generally, do you need to have an account at the bank to get a loan from them?

This is a tough situation for me, as I recently graduated from college and moved away from home. I don’t have any friends who can give me rides or help me look for a car. I’d like to be prepared if I need to start the process of finding a loan and then purchasing a car.

I bank at a local credit union in the metro NY area (and have commented about using credit unions here in the past ) and recommend that route.

My credit union will only give car loans for cars 10 years or younger. Why? Because the car is collateral in case you don’t pay back the loan. If the car stop working and you cannot afford to fix it, the credit union doesn’t want to repo a busted car.

Want a car loan? Need an account. The minimum for a savings account there is $5. Get pre-approved for the loan in the amount so you know that you’ll be able to finance it when you start shopping around. You’ll have to use a bank if you buy from an individual. If you buy from a business, they will attempt to loan you the money as well. There’s tons written about financing cars at dealerships and car negotiating for you to read. Commonly, it is recommended that you do not walk in and announce that you’ve been pre-approved elsewhere or for what amount.

Huh. I was not previously aware of the limitation on model years for car loans.

Well, the issue with car loans is that they will take a security interest in your car, so the car is collateral on the loan and therefore the lender has to care about the quality/upkeep of the car (FYI, there is typically a minimum amount of comprehensive and/or collision insurance coverage required when you take out an auto loan).

One potential alternative is a line of credit or personal loan. Discover has such a product, though I’m sure there are other, similar alternatives, possibly even one at your local credit union. This is different from a credit card in that 1) the interest rate tends to be lower, and 2) the monthly payment and payment term are fixed. For a small amount such as you are planning to borrow ($3-5K), it may be entirely feasible to get a personal loan.

The upside is that they do not care at all what you spend it on, or require any particular level of insurance on your car. The downside is that the interest rate may be a couple points worse than that of a car loan, and your repayment term may well be shorter (24-36 months is common), so the monthly payments will be higher.

posted by rkent at 8:00 PM on May 25, 2010

What the others said reflects my experience too, but I will add one bit of advice.

Last time I bought a car, I arranged for financing ahead of time with my credit union. I qualified for their very best rate, which turned out to be the lowest rate among about 10 banks and credit unions I checked. I wound up buying a very slightly used car from a dealer and the manufacturer had incentive financing which was about one percent lower than that. The finance guy at the dealership somehow wound up finding financing through the dealer services department at a major national bank which was even 1% lower than the manufacturer’s deal.

The point is that you should come prepared with your own financing in place, but be open to the possibility of a better deal. Also be aware that some dealers try to simulate a better deal by giving you a lower rate but a higher overall price. For that reason, you should negotiate on the price and all other details before you even begin talking to the dealer about financing. You should also make it clear that you’re totally indifferent about the car and prepared to walk at the first sign of nonsense.


FRB: Charge-Off and Delinquency Rates on Loans and Leases at Commercial Banks #student #loan #network


#bank loan rates
#

Delinquency Rates

1. Residential real estate loans include loans secured by one- to four-family properties, including home equity lines of credit. Return to table

Not available.

Source. Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) Consolidated Reports of Condition and Income (1985-2000: FFIEC 031 through 034; 2001-: FFIEC 031 041).

Notes

Charge-offs, which are the value of loans removed from the books and charged against loss reserves, are measured net of recoveries as a percentage of average loans and annualized.

Delinquent loans are those past due thirty days or more and still accruing interest as well as those in nonaccrual status. They are measured as a percentage of end-of-period loans.

Banks are insured U.S.-chartered commercial banks.

Size, where used, is measured by consolidated assets adjusted for mergers; where used, “other” banks are those smaller than the 100 largest.

Special Notes

The adoption by some banks of FAS 159, The Fair Value Option for Financial Assets and Financial Liabilities, affected charge-off and delinquency rate data for 2008:1. Because the effects of the accounting change on the dollar volume of loans reported on banks’ loan books were small, the effects of the accounting change on banks’ charge-off and delinquency rates were presumably small for the industry as a whole. Information on the dollar impacts on banks’ loan books can be found on page 14 in the “Notes on the Data” section beginning with the April 11, H.8, Assets and Liabilities of Commercial Bank in the United States, statistical release. For more information on FAS 159, please refer to www.fasb.org/st/summary/stsum159.shtml.

Owing to a reporting problem, delinquency rates for residential and commercial mortgage loans for the third quarter of 1999 are partially estimated.


Banks that make the most money, and the least, on credit card loans #student #loan #consolidation #calculator


#credit card loans
#

Banks that make the most money, and the least, on credit card loans

By Fred O. Williams

The most lucrative card companies are ones you probably never heard of — but whose cards you just might carry.

Store-card issuers Comenity Bank and Synchrony Financial, formerly called GE Capital, reaped the most interest and fees from their cardholders among 12 major card issuers, an analysis by CreditCards.com found.

Banks that issue credit cards are enjoying high profits these days, buoyed by low defaults and cheap funding costs. But some card banks are better off than others, thanks to cardholders who shell out more interest and fees. Creditcards.com analyzed financial reports filed by 1,300 U.S. banks to see who made the most — and the least — from their card business in 2013. (See Credit card income at 500 U.S. banks . )

The analysis found a wide spread in card income — with some big banks collecting three times as much from cardholders as their competitors. The industry generated an average yield of 12.4 cents on each dollar of card balances last year, before losses and other costs. Among the top dozen issuers, yields ranged from a high of 28.4 cents to a low of 8.4 cents per dollar of card loans.

How can some card companies charge much, much more than others?

No. 1, consumers are not doing a lot of shopping around, said Jeanne Hogarth, vice president of policy at the Center for Financial Services Innovation. And No. 2, it amazes me how insensitive consumers are to [the] price of credit.

Even people with good credit are lured into high-rate cards, when they could qualify for a cheaper deal, the analysis found. On the other hand, companies making the least from cardholders kept a lid on rates and fees that other banks use to drive profits.

Many applicants, drawn in by a card’s instant discounts or rewards, overlook its interest rates, penalty fees and other important costs — to their own detriment. When you’re looking to get a credit card, we want you to shop based on the lowest cost of borrowing, said Todd Mark, vice president of education at Consumer Credit Counseling Service of Greater Dallas.

What yields measure

Credit cards are known as one of banking’s profit centers. A group of 16 banks that specialize in credit cards had triple the industry’s average return on assets in the third quarter of 2014, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.’s Quarterly Banking Profile.

The yields calculated by CreditCards.com are not a look at bottom-line profits. They exclude the costs of running a card business, such as marketing, customer service, fraud prevention and the cost of funds. The yields also leave out some income sources, such as the swipe fees that retailers pay. However, the yield is a good yardstick for comparing how much money each company charges its cardholders, per dollar in balances.

The chart lists 12 banks with the biggest U.S. card business in 2013. The first bar represents their average yield — cents of interest and fees they collect per dollar of balances. The second bar shows the yield after deducting money lost when cardholders default.

After Comenity and GE, the issuers with the next-highest yields are Capital One and Citibank — both of which have large store-card businesses in addition to their general purpose cards. APRs on store-card agreements are typically several points higher than rates on general-purpose cards. Wells Fargo, Discover, Chase and Bank of America were in the middle of the pack of the 12 card banks, with interest and fee income that hovered near the industry average.

Most expensive card companies

Comenity, a unit of Plano, Texas-based Alliance Data Systems, is the bank behind more than 120 store-branded cards from niche retailers such as Abercrombie, Dress Barn and ZGallerie. Although its name may not ring a bell, the bank has a long reach — with 33 million active accounts, it estimates that one in 10 employed U.S. adults carries at least one of its cards.