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College Credit Plus

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Lakeland Community College’s College Credit Plus Program (CCP) offers high school students the opportunity to enroll at Lakeland on a part-time or full-time basis, and earn college credit which may also be used to fulfill their high school graduation requirements.

The intent of the CCP program is to offer a broad range of college level classes which provide educational opportunities not typically available in high school. Admission into this program is open to students who have clearly demonstrated the ability to handle college-level coursework.

Criteria for Participation

Interested students and their parents should follow the 5 steps below to determine eligibility to participate in CCP.

  1. Attend a high school CCP information session .
  2. File a CCP application with Lakeland Community College.
  3. Submit High School Transcripts
  4. Register for placement test and place into college level English either through successful completion of Lakeland’s Placement Test or submission of acceptable ACT/SAT scores.

**To participate in math courses through CCP, students must have successfully completed Algebra 2 and place into college-level math.

  • Attend a CCP new student orientation and registration session. Parents are required to attend with their child.

    Mandatory for Home School and Nonpublic Students:

    Home School Students


  • Computer Security and Investigations: Fleming College

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    Fleming College

    The Computer Security and Investigations program is designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge and skills to take a leadership role in the protection and security of information technology.

    Program Highlights

    The Computer Security and Investigations program is designed to provide you with the necessary knowledge and skills to take a leadership role in the protection and security of information technology. Your classes are regularly reviewed and improved to be the most current subjects demanded by the industry, such as:

    • Advanced Ethical Hacking
    • Threat and Risk Analysis
    • Information Security
    • Advanced Computer Forensics
    • Internet and Hacking Investigations
    • CISCO Network Design and Management
    • Network Security
    • Criminology
    • Justice Studies

    In addition to these cutting edge subjects, you will also learn how to develop systems, procedures, and human resources to manage the risks associated with information technology, and be capable of providing technical assistance to prevent, investigate, and protect individuals and organizations from cyber-crime. Your studies will be from a security management and law enforcement perspective, with emphasis placed on both the technological and management skills required to implement information technology security, and the investigative skills necessary to respond appropriately to breaches of security.

    You will have the added benefit of courses in law, justice, and criminology, taking advantage of Fleming College’s reputation and experience in these fields, in addition to obtaining the technical training you need to function as a technological consultant. In this three-year program, the final sixth semester is an applied project or co-operative field placement in partnership with business, industry, a law enforcement agency, or government department.

    Why Choose Fleming

    Fleming has a well-known track record of producing talented graduates in both the Applied Computing and Engineering Science, and the Law and Justice fields. As such, you will acquire the best we have to offer–in a new, winning combination that will put you on the road to success as an in-demand computer security specialist.

    There are no other programs like this in Ontario. The program will provide you with the knowledge and skills to prepare you for industry certification in both the computer forensics and networking disciplines. As you progress through the program you will gain the skills required to become industry certified in a number of areas, including:

    • CCNA – Cisco Certified Network Architect
    • CCE – Certified Computer Examiner
    • Security+
    • Network+
    • A+
    • Linux+
    • MCSE – Microsoft Certified System Engineer
    • CISSP – Certified Information Systems Security Professional (student level qualification)
    • CEH – Certified Ethical Hacker
    • EnCE – Encase Certified Examiner

    With your diploma, and these top certifications, you will demonstrate your abilities and value to the industry, gaining you the employment advantage.

    Work Experience

    In your final semester, you will work on an intensive team project or co-operative field placement. Each student will contribute specialized knowledge, learned in his or her program of study, to the solution of a real world technological problem posed by a sponsoring business or organization. Recent projects include:

    • Co-operative placements within financial and forensic firms, working real cases
    • Co-operative placements within corporate security departments and information security service providers
    • Security and penetration testing of a large Internet Service Provider
    • Forensic analysis and creation of standards for a security corporation
    • Development of a Linux based Darknet and Intrusion Detection system for a professional penetration testing company
    • Development and field deployment of a computer network Intrusion Detection System for a managed security service company to support large commercial clients

    This applied project or co-operative field placement will enhance problem-solving skills, applied industry knowledge, and the ability to work as part of a team. You’ll also learn critical workplace skills such as time management, how to map a critical path, and presentation skills. Since you may be working on sophisticated developmental or research based work, sponsors will often use the project as a testing ground and recruitment opportunity.

    Is this You?

    • excellent oral and written communication skills
    • good problem solving skills
    • creative and analytical thinking skills
    • previous computing experience
    • able to keep a cool head in a crisis
    • research and investigative skills and interest
    • desire to learn and be challenged
    • strong time management skills

    Career Opportunities

    Career opportunities are available in both public and private sector organizations. Job titles include:

    • Information Technology Security Analyst
    • Information Security Administrator
    • Computer Security Consultant
    • Investigator
    • Network Security Specialist
    • Computer Forensics Examiner
    • Digital Investigative Specialist

    Starting salaries for many positions are $40,000 to $60,000. Industry surveys identify that IT security professionals, with the security skills you will acquire, consistently earn higher income than others in the industry.

    Minimum Admission Requirements

    OSSD with the majority of credits at the College (C) and Open (O) level, including:

    • 2 College (C) English courses (Grade 11 or Grade 12)
    • 2 College (C) Math courses (Grade 11 or Grade 12)

    When (C) is the minimum course level for admission, (U) or (U/C) courses are also accepted.

    Mature Students

    If you are 19 years of age or older before classes start, and you do not possess an OSSD, you can write the Canadian Adult Achievement Test to assess your eligibility for admission. Additional testing or academic upgrading may be necessary to meet specific course requirements for this program.

    Advanced Standing

    Do you have another college diploma, or have you completed other technology courses at another college or university? You may be eligible for advanced standing entry to the Computer Security and Investigations program. With this fast track option, you can quickly complete the program and become qualified to enter the field of computer security. Contact the program coordinator to find out how you can take advantage of this opportunity.

    Transfer Agreements

    You may be able to use credits obtained at Fleming College to continue your postsecondary education in pursuit of a degree. The articulation and credit transfer agreements with our partner institutions are summarized below.

    University of Ontario Institute of Technology


    Christian College – University

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    secure your spot at SBU!

    Ready to make your spot in the SBU family official? Take the next step by submitting your $200 enrollment deposit. T his deposit is a prepayment on your tuition and will reserve your spot in classes and give you the opportunity to sign up for campus housing.

    • Reserve your place in fall 2017 classes at SBU.
    • Increase your chances of getting your preferred dorm.
    • Let everyone know that you’re proud to be a Bearcat.

    Nursing classes begin in June at SBU-Salem

    An associate’s degree in nursing is now available through the Dr. Tracy and Debbie Dobbs Nursing Department at Southwest Baptist University’s Salem campus. After a successful site visit on Friday, April 28, the first classes will be offered beginning June 5.

    SBU Enactus finishes in top 8 at national competition

    Southwest Baptist University Enactus matched its best result in the Enactus U.S. National Exposition by placing in the top eight after finishing runner-up in its league in the semifinals at the competition held May 21-23 at the Kansas City Convention Center.


    City college fort lauderdale florida

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    Florida Convention Center is ready for your Event

    Our conference facilities provide a great venue to host your conference, meeting or event. The location of the Greater Fort Lauderdale / Broward County Convention Center is irresistible. This Florida convention center is nestled on the Intracoastal Waterway, and surrounded by all that South Florida has to offer. Our conference facilities staff is here to make your next event a success! The Fort Lauderdale Convention Center will help you through each step, from event booking and planning to exhibitor setup, ensuring a great conference, trade show, company meeting or event.

    1950 EISENHOWER BOULEVARD
    FORT LAUDERDALE, FL 33316
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    Hotel Management Degree – Bachelor s Degree Hotel Management, College Degree Hotel Management, Bachelor s Degree Hotel Management Michigan

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    Hotel Management Degree
    Bachelor’s Degree Hotel Management

    Student Resources

    Why Major in Hotel Management?

    The hotel industry leads the service segment of our economy with continued expansion and opportunities abounding. Hotel Management Students are prepared for management, sales and marketing opportunities in the hotel industry by course work that combines theory with authentic hands-on learning experiences.

    Hotel Management students have numerous opportunities to interact with hotel industry professionals, as they are regular guest speakers in classes, and provide site visitations and internship opportunities. The Hotel Management degree program has an industry advisory board made up of professionals from across the spectrum of the hotel industry and provides students with employment opportunities by inviting the top companies in the industry to campus to recruit. The placement rate of hotel management graduates exceeds 95 percent.

    Advance Your Career with a Hotel Management Degree

    More than 20 scholarships are available in the college hotel management degree program. The awards are generally based on scholastic accomplishment, industry experience, extracurricular activities, career aspirations and need. In addition to course work, the program requires a minimum of 400 hours of paid work experience (internship), which is often completed with the nation’s finest hotels and lodging establishments, as well as international experiences.

    A 12-credit Hotel Management certificate and an 18-credit Restaurant and Food Industry/Hotel Management minor are available.

    Hotel Management College Graduates Get Great Jobs

    The hospitality industry is a people-and service-oriented business. Individuals trained in hospitality programs manage operations where food, lodging or both are provided. These may include luxury, full-service, convention, all-suite, mid-scale and budget hotels, motels, resorts, conference centers, inns, bed and breakfasts, and airline operations.

    The Hotel Management degree program has a joint education partnership with the University-owned Holiday Inn Hotel and Conference Center to increase student awareness of the complexity of the hospitality industry and provide hands-on opportunities. The hotel allows hotel management students to ‘test the waters’ of the hospitality industry.

    The demand for better qualified and professionally trained hospitality managers continues to increase. Social, technical and demographic changes suggest that the industry’s growth will extend well into the 21st century. In addition to traditional hospitality venues, there are excellent opportunities for advancement in multi-unit franchise management, corporate staff positions with national and international corporations, and opportunities within the travel and tourism industry.

    Bachelor’s Degree Hotel Management
    Admission Requirements

    Admission for the Hotel Management degree program is open to high school graduates who demonstrate academic preparedness, maturity and seriousness of purpose with backgrounds appropriate to their chosen program of studies. High school GPA and the mathematics and reading ACT scores will be considered in the admission and placement process.

    Some students may need to take additional preparatory courses which may extend the time required to complete degree requirements.

    College Degree Hotel Management
    Graduation Requirements

    The Hotel Management degree program at Ferris leads to a bachelor of science degree. Graduation from the Hotel Management requires a minimum 2.0 GPA in core classes, in the major and overall.

    If you would like more information on Hotel Management Bachelor’s Degree Programs at Ferris State University call (231) 591-2000 .

    About Ferris State University: College classes including our Hotel Management Degree Program, are taught at all levels by professional teachers, not graduate assistants. College students at Ferris State University, including our Hotel Management Degree Program students, study in more than 170 different college educational programs – including doctorate degrees, masters degrees, bachelor’s degrees and associate degree programs.

    Ferris State University offers a wide variety of scholarships and financial aid. A majority of our students receive financial aid assistance. We encourage you to explore this website for more information on available scholarships and financial aid opportunities at Ferris State University. Ferris State provides all enrolled students access to a variety of academic skill-building opportunities that will assist them in their pursuit of academic excellence in a format that accommodates various learning preferences and schedules. At FSU students experience small classes with individual attention in 170 career-oriented majors leading to job placement for our graduates. FSU students also enjoy 220 student organizations for fun in a relaxed, hometown setting in the heart of Michigan’s recreation area.

    The group presentation, by one of our admissions recruiters, includes information on academic offerings, scholarships, housing, student life, and costs. A question and answer period follows the presentation and includes a few surprises! Lunch is provided at one of our well known dining facilities on campus. After lunch, guests may take part in a walking tour of campus led by one of our exceptional student guides. The walking tour takes approximately 1 hour.

    If you would like more information on Hotel Management Degree or would like to talk with or visit our campus in Big Rapids, Michigan contact us.

    Bachelor’s Degree Hotel Management


    College of Accountancy, City Colleges, city college psychology.

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    PREPARE FOR YOUR ACCA EXAMS AT CITY COLLEGES

    Join us at City Colleges, for your ACCA course for the September and December 2017 exam sitting.

    City Colleges courses are streamed live and recorded you never miss a class or an explanation!

    Best wishes and good luck in your exams,

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    Head of College of Business Accountancy

    F1, P1 and P3 lecturer

    Choose Your Sitting

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    Why City Colleges for your ACCA?

    A SUPERB TEAM OF ACCA TUTORS With multiple prizewinners

    LIVE / STREAMED / RECORDED CLASSES Watch online, anytime, anywhere

    CONVENIENT LOCATION South Great George’s Street, Dublin 2

    BPP PLATINUM APPROVED MATERIALS With every course

    REALISTIC TUITION FEES GREAT OFFERS Second course half price, resits unemployed half price

    SMALLER CLASS SIZES More personal tuition for you

    About the Team

    Our superb team of Tutors includes Mel Kilkenny (F6, F9 P6), Shaun Browne (F5, F8 P7),

    Tutors are available for online and phone support.

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    OWEN O’REILLY

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    MEL KILKENNY

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    Testimonials

    Martin Corboy is the most brilliant lecturer I have ever met. Viktorija Balandina

    I think by far they have the best lecturers, very exam focused. Michelle Cleary

    I would definitely recommend City Colleges for ACCA. The exam technique provided allowed me to approach the exam answers effectively and efficiently. Kamila Wawrzyniak Conboy

    Availability of online facility means I don t miss classes when I travel with work Ciaran Moloney

    Great lecturers, great facilities and helpful staff. Emma Coffey

    I would have no hesitation in recommending Martin Corboy for P5. He is very approachable. The class was very exam focused paying attention to exam technique which I believe was the difference in me passing this paper. Lisa Kirrane

    I find online lectures extremely useful if I am unable to attend class because of work and also as a study aid Carol Byrne

    Shaun is the best lecturer I ve had so far! Really enjoyed his lectures, he made a subject that could be quite boring (if thought by someone else) interesting, relevant and fun! He gave an easy to understand structure to all the chapters/questions and showed us that even though a question may be worded very technically or confusing if you pick out the keywords it can be answered with the structure learned in class. Catherine Boughton

    I have passed P1 and P3 thanks to Owen s fabulous lectures. I passed both and am delighted and I honestly believe a lot of the credit is yours and is a lot to do with the way you teach the subjects. Your lectures are very informative, you give great exam tips (USA, PEA), making the subjects relevant and interesting. Your hand-outs are superb, you draw attention to the relevant articles and focus on past exam questions and things to be aware of that may crop up again. I went into both papers prepared and knowing the style of answer required and how to score the marks, this was thanks to your advice. I would highly recommend your classes, even to people who can’t physically attend them. Your recordings are focused on those at home as well in the class and I really appreciated this. Michelle Baird, ACCA P1 P3 with Owen O Reilly


  • Vogue Institute – Top and Best Art and Design College, is the art institute a college.

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    Experience a World Class Art and Design Institute in India

    The essence of fashion, design and attitude is what is taught at Vogue Institute of Fashion Technology. Professionals who are zealous about their work and willing to share their maestro teach the young talent who, once graduated, will reach the zenith professional levels.

    It is not just about fashion, style or trend it’s about setting up right attitude into youngsters and at the right time. In the journey with us, you’ll witness a striking approach where theory is taught alongside practice, learn that creativity is a gift to be nurtured, nourished and stimulated continuously, with passion and dedication. For the same we are awarded to be the best and chosen among top 10 best institutes for art and design in the country.

    We are Vogue, and we’re glad to meet you

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    Watch the video to know more about Vogue

    TIMES NOW EVANGELIST

    VOGUE THE EVANGELIST

    Vogue Institute of Fashion Technology is amongst the top 100 Educational Evangelist in India and as one of the top 18 Educational institutes in the country. Watch Vogue on Times Now! Three Cheers to Vogue Institute of Fashion Technology.

    ACADEMIC PROGRAMMES

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    HERALDING A NEW ERA IN FASHION

    The difference between style and fashion is quality. Giorgio Armani.

    VOGUE INSTITUTE OF FASHION TECHNOLOGY , a multi disciplinary, umbrella institute was founded in year 1996. It is a pioneering design incubator that nurtures emerging design talent Education here is centered on the development of ideas. Vogue is the hub where designing is induced with passion standards of design education are set with creative educational culture, development of problem solving capabilities by promoting design competencies.

    Years of Academic Excellence

    CAMPUS

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    MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIRMAN

    “The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched they must be felt with the heart.” These inspirational words come to us from the American educator, Helen Keller, who overcame the adversity of being blind and deaf to become one of the 20th century s leading humanitarians. We can relate this thought to the field of design as well as “Design must first be felt to be expressed”. Creativity is an expression of our inner being and how we make sense of the world around us. Each of you who have chosen to embark on a career in the Creative Arts will understand what I mean. Every thought and idea begins in the mind and is translated through the fingertips onto paper. New technology now makes it possible for us to translate our ideas directly onto computers.

    EVENTS AT VOGUE Campus Atmosphere filled with Fun, Frolic Joy.

    We don t believe in all studies and no play, and hence you will be surrounded by euphoric events all year round to give you a break and to bring out the rockstar in you. And you said education was boring?


    Military – Veterans – Fayetteville Technical Community College, college credits for military training.

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    Military & Veterans

    Find out how many credits you have already earned toward a degree with Credit for Military Training.

    Fast Track Your Degree

    1. All military service members are encouraged to visit their Education Center on post before enrolling in classes with FTCC.

    2. Earn Credit for Military Training to reduce the time it takes to earn your associate degree. Select a branch to get started: Air Force | Army | Coast Guard | Marine Corps | Navy

    3. Sign up for Online Flex Courses and complete at your own pace to finish your degree requirements.

    4. Complete a Military Certificate Program for additional industry credentials.

    5. Take advantage of our University Partnerships to fully transfer your credits to pursue a bachelor s degree.

    College credits for military training

    Why FTCC

    • Affordable Tuition + Military Scholarships
    • Over 200 Programs of Study Many 100% Online
    • Rolling Monthly Start Dates for Ultimate Convenience
    • Spouse Programs (MyCAA Scholarship)
    • Tuition-Free Transition Tech Programs for Veterans
    • University Partnerships to Transfer to a University with Ease
    • Waived Administrative Fees for Students Using Tuition Assistance

    College credits for military training

    Additional Resources

    Air Force

    FTCC is committed to helping you balance your military service, family and education through affordable and flexible degree options. We make getting your education easy by partnering with military programs such as General Education Mobile (GEM). At FTCC, you can complete requirements to earn your CCAF degree and also earn our Associate of General Education degree, which is fully transferable to the university degree. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    Air Force TA Form: AF 1227 | Help Line: 877-596-5771, Option 7

    Air Force ROTC

    Fayetteville Technical Community College is an affiliated school of Detachment 607. You can enroll at FTCC to earn a degree and join Air Force ROTC to pursue a commission with the U.S. Air Force. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    With over 100 Military Occupational Specialties evaluated for college credit, soldiers can apply credit earned through military training to an associate degree and complete remaining courses either at the Fort Bragg Center or online with self-paced Flex Courses. Fayetteville Technical Community College offers scholarships to eligible active duty service members that, when combined with the Army’s tuition assistance program, can cover up to 100% of undergrad tuition and a significant portion of grad tuition. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    Army TA Form: DA 2171 | Help Line: 800-817-9990

    Coast Guard

    FTCC is dedicated to providing education opportunities to our Guardsmen that are flexible and affordable. We recognize the demands of military service and are committed to serving your educational needs. Applying is easy and an Admissions Advisor can assist you in exploring your options. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    Coast Guard TA Form: CGI 1560 | Help Line: 405-954-1360

    Intelligence Studies (A25700)

    The Intelligence Studies curriculum is designed to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary for employment and growth in the intelligence profession. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    Marine Corps

    College credit will be awarded for Marine Corps experience and training including MOS producing schools, Marine Corps Institute courses, the Sergeants Course Distance Education Program, the Corporals Course, and Recruit Training based on evaluation by The American Council on Education and FTCC’s Credit for Military Training program. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    National Guard

    Guard soldiers can take advantage of our educational pathways and Credit for Military Training just as easily as active duty service members. Apply your credits earned through military training to an associate degree and choose to take classes conveniently located at the Fort Bragg Center or online with Flex Courses that can be completed at your own pace. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    National Guard TA Form: Army DA 2171

    Did you know you can get college credit for your Navy experience? The American Council on Education (ACE) collaborates with DoD to review military training and experience and recommend appropriate college credit for members of the Armed Forces. FTCC has reviewed these recommendations and has converted your Navy training and skills into college credit. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    Navy TA Form: NAVEDTRA 1560/5 | Help Line: 800-817-1659

    Science Prerequisites for Health Professions

    FTCC offers the courses needed to help you apply for the Accelerated Second Degree BSN Option at East Carolina University or the Interservice Physician Assistant Program (IPAP). The courses offered meet the requirements set forth in AR 601-20 that must be met as part of your Army PA Application. Please note, courses offered assist you with application preparation into the various programs.

    Special Operations

    For over 5 years, FTCC has partnered with all services to maximize the unique blend of tactical and technical expertise, language proficiency, and cultural abilities of SOF service members and convert that experience into college credits. With FTCC’s Credit for Military Training, you can earn up to 48 college credits toward an Associate in General Education. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    Spouse Programs – MyCAA

    FTCC is proud to participate in the My Career Advancement Account (MyCAA) Scholarship. Through the MyCAA Scholarship program, an eligible military spouse can receive up to $4,000 of tuition assistance over two years for certain areas of study.

    Veterans

    The All American Veterans Center opens its doors to all veterans and families, whether pursuing an education at FTCC or seeking a place to connect with peers. Our veteran services technicians offer personal assistance with your educational benefits and our center provides full support to veterans through a variety of resources, partnerships, and programs. We encourage you to visit your Education Center on post before you enroll in classes with FTCC.

    FTCC Credit Search Tool

    Use the Credit Search Tool for an approximation of the credit you have already earned at FTCC through your military training and experience. Simply select your branch, occupations held, pay grade, and any additional military schools attended.

    If you have had various occupations throughout your service, you can select as many occupations as needed. You can also choose to search for your occupation, or select from the list in the drop-down menu.

    Based on your selections, the search tool will generate a printable list of all the courses for which you could receive college credit if you attend FTCC. Remember that these credits are in addition to any college credit you have earned at other colleges and universities.

    College credits for military training


    Southwest Texas Junior College, sul ross rio grande college.

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    President’s Welcome

    Sul ross rio grande college

    Welcome to Southwest Texas Junior College, one of the top ten community colleges in the United States! More

    Portals

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    Affiliates

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    Calendar

    12 Week Semester: September 25 – December 15, 2017

    (Fall 16 Week Semester)

    (Fall 12 Week Semester)

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    News & Events

    The Texas Legislature passed Senate Bill 11 during the 84th Legislative Session in 2015, which was signed into law in June of the same year by Governor Greg Abbott.

    The Hondo, Medina Valley and Pearsall campuses are exempt due to those buildings being leased by entities which are not required to adhere to the new law. The building in Hondo is leased from the City of Hondo, while the Pearsall building is leased from the Pearsall Independent School District. In Castroville, SWTJC classes are housed in a building leased from the Medina Valley Independent School District.

    SWTJC President, Dr. Hector Gonzales formed the Campus Concealed Carry Committee to obtain input and feedback from the SWTJC community regarding the implementation of the new law.

    The committee submitted a report containing implementation recommendations to President Gonzales.

    Exclusionary Zones areas on campus where the concealed carry of a firearm is not permitted, which include child care facilities located on campus, nursing and radiology laboratories, testing rooms, libraries, cafeterias and snack bars. For a complete list of exclusionary zones visit swtjc.edu for a frequently asked questions page has been published.

    SWTJC Registrar Luis Fernandez reminds students that time is running out to get applications for financial aid completed.

    “Students who will be seeking financial aid and who haven’t completed all their paperwork need to get busy,” Fernandez said.

    Registration for fall classes started in April and over 2,900 students have already registered.

    Fernandez says the earlier students register the better their chances of getting the instructors they want, the classes they need and the times they need them.

    “Registering early also gives students more time to arrange payment options,” Fernandez said.

    Highlighting the action taken, the board adopted an operating budget for the fiscal year 2018, appointed a vice president of the Del Rio campus and approved a salary increase.

    The fiscal year 2017-2018 budget is balanced at $45.6 million, up $2.8 million from the 2016-2017 budget.

    Increases in state support and tuition account for most of the rise. Hector Gonzales, college president, said, We have realized about a $400,000 increase in state appropriations.

    The board of trustees approved a salary increase of two steps for all employees on a classified scale. Also, board members authorized one percent as an equivalent for one step for unclassified employees.

    In other business, trustees appointed Connie Buchanan as the new vice president of the Del Rio campus, replacing Derek Sandoval who filled the vice president of administrative services earlier this year. Buchanan s new role as vice president of Del Rio will take effect July 1.


    Transfer Courses and Appeals

    #college #course #transfer


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    Transfer Courses and Appeals

    Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning Public Policy (EJB)

    School of Management and Labor Relations (SMLR)

    All transfer students have the right to appeal for a reconsideration of an evaluation of a transfer course. For information on the academic policies of the Professional Schools, please refer to the Academic Policies. Transfer courses of various modes of delivery from colleges, universities and schools, eligible to receive federal funding as listed by the US Department of Education, will be evaluated for transferability.

    Applicants must state on their application all previously attended institutions of higher learning. The omission or falsification of information may be a cause for automatic dismissal or denial of transfer credit.

    Official transcripts from all prior accredited institutions must be submitted before any admission decision is made. Students will receive the maximum allowable credits for transfer (up to 60.0 credits from a two-year institution culminating in an associate degree and up to 90.0 credits from a four-year institution offering a bachelor’s degree). Students having credits from both two-year and four-year institutions may receive up to 90.0 total transfer credits.

    Transfer for Holders of Associate Degrees

    Any applicant who has successfully completed an associate degree program at any New Jersey County or Community College is eligible for transfer admission. Students who hold an associate degree in an approved transfer program (Associate in Arts; Associate in Science, and an Associate in Applied Science in Technical Studies as part of NJ PLACE) can transfer all of the credits earned in that degree program to the school conferring the degree, up to a maximum of 60.0 credits (or up to 64.0 if that was already granted by another undergraduate program within Rutgers). Limits on transfer credits to the undergraduate professional schools include: no more than 2.0 credits of physical education and no more than 25.0 technical credits. Only courses with a grade of “C” or better qualify for transfer. Credits earned beyond an associate degree program will be evaluated for transfer on a course-by-course basis.

    An applicant who attended another college after receiving an associate degree is considered under the policy outlined for general transfer.

    Students Transferring from New Jersey Community Colleges

    Students should first refer to njtransfer.org to determine the proper evaluation of any given course offered at a New Jersey County/Community College. If the transfer evaluation and njtransfer.org are in disagreement the student should submit a Transfer Evaluation Appeal Form. All clerical errors will be corrected promptly and the student will be notified by email.

    Students Transferring from Schools Other than New Jersey Community Colleges


    Colleges in Cleveland, Ohio (OH) – Universities, Trade

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    Cleveland Colleges, Universities, Trade and Vocational Schools

    Cleveland Colleges and Schools

    Colleges in Cleveland, Ohio

    There are at least 20 colleges in Cleveland, listed and described below. These schools represent 57,719 or more students (full-time and part-time), a combined student body equivalent to 43,642 full-time students, and a reported 6,994 dorm rooms.

    The largest schools here include Cuyahoga Community College District, Cleveland State University, Case Western Reserve University and John Carroll University.

    We also provide an extensive list of Ohio Colleges .

    Of Note For College Students

    • There are a lot of studio and one-bedroom apartments in Cleveland.

    Featured Colleges in the Cleveland Area (QuickSchools )

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    • Program Categories: Health, Healthcare and Nursing
    • Degrees: Bachelor, Master

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    Colleges in Cleveland with Selective Admissions

    These schools do not admit all qualified applicants.
    Based on 2008-2009 information.

    • Programs: Many programs. Most popular include: law, various nursing, social work, medicine, biomedical engineering, banking, psychology, business administration
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates. Bachelor’s. Master’s. Doctor’s. First-professional degree.
    • Student Body: 9,844 students, 7,122 full-time equivalent.
    • Dorms: 3,484 student capacity.
    • SAT 25-75th percentile: Verbal: 590-690. Math: 620-720. Writing: 580-680.
    • Flexibility: AP credits.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. Study abroad option. Member of a national athletic association.
    • Programs: licensed practical nurse
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates.
    • Student Body: 79 students, 171 full-time equivalent.
    • SAT: not generally required.
    • Flexibility: AP credits.
    • Notable: Career counseling.
    • Programs: Many programs. Most popular include: business management, criminal justice and administration, accounting, legal assistant, human resources, liberal arts and humanities, computer support, marketing studies
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates. Associate’s. Bachelor’s. Master’s.
    • Student Body: 570 students, 355 full-time equivalent.
    • SAT: not generally required.
    • Flexibility: Distance learning. Weekend classes available. Credit for experience. AP credits. Some high school credits accepted.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. Remedial services.
    • Programs: Several programs. Most popular include: multimedia, painting, drawing, interior design, textile arts, medical illustrator, sculpture, illustration
    • Degrees/Certificates: Bachelor’s.
    • Student Body: 485 students, 498 full-time equivalent.
    • Dorms: 105 student capacity.
    • SAT 25-75th percentile: Verbal: 470-580. Math: 470-540.
    • Flexibility: AP credits.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. Remedial services. Study abroad option.
    • Programs: music performance, music theory and composition, various music studies
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates. Bachelor’s. Master’s. Doctor’s.
    • Student Body: 453 students, 474 full-time equivalent.
    • Dorms: 100 student capacity.
    • SAT: not generally required.
    • Flexibility: Distance learning. AP credits. Some high school credits accepted.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. Remedial services. Study abroad option.
    • Programs: Many programs. Most popular include: business management, curriculum and instruction, law, psychology, social work, communication studies, finance, accounting
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates. Bachelor’s. Master’s. Doctor’s. First-professional degree.
    • Student Body: 15,038 students, 12,087 full-time equivalent.
    • Dorms: 842 student capacity.
    • SAT 25-75th percentile: Verbal: 410-540. Math: 400-570.
    • Flexibility: Distance learning. Weekend classes available. Credit for experience. AP credits. Some high school credits accepted.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. On-campus daycare. Remedial services. Study abroad option. Member of a national athletic association.
    • Programs: registered nursing
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates.
    • Student Body: 289 students, 208 full-time equivalent.
    • SAT: not generally required.
    • Flexibility: Weekend classes available. Some high school credits accepted.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. Remedial services.
    • Programs: Many programs. Most popular include: business management, psychology, communication studies, marketing, biology, English, accounting, early childhood education
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates. Bachelor’s. Master’s.
    • Student Body: 3,766 students, 3,535 full-time equivalent.
    • Dorms: 1,962 student capacity.
    • SAT 25-75th percentile: Verbal: 490-590. Math: 490-600. Writing: 480-590.
    • Flexibility: Distance learning. AP credits. Some high school credits accepted.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. Study abroad option. Member of a national athletic association.
    • Programs: Many programs. Most popular include: business management, accounting, education of learning disabled, psychology, reading teaching, business and related services, marketing, early childhood education
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates. Associate’s. Bachelor’s. Master’s.
    • Student Body: 1,490 students, 1,373 full-time equivalent.
    • Dorms: 501 student capacity.
    • SAT 25-75th percentile: Verbal: 410-520. Math: 420-550.
    • Flexibility: Distance learning. Weekend classes available. Credit for experience. AP credits. Some high school credits accepted.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. Remedial services. Member of a national athletic association.

    Cleveland Colleges with Open Admissions

    Schools open to most or all qualified applicants (qualifications vary).
    Based on 2008-2009 information.

    • Programs: medical assistant, dental assistant, medical records admin, pharmacy tech
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates.
    • Student Body: 126 students, 364 full-time equivalent.
    • Notable: Placement assistance.
    • Programs: carpentry, welding, child care provider, electrician, office data entry, machinist
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates.
    • Student Body: 97 students, 124 full-time equivalent.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. Remedial services.
    • Programs: Many programs. Most popular include: liberal arts and sciences, registered nursing, early childhood education, business management, licensed practical nurse, legal assistant, administrative assistant, criminal justice and police
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates. Associate’s.
    • Student Body: 24,563 students, 16,019 full-time equivalent.
    • Flexibility: Distance learning. Credit for experience. AP credits. Some high school credits accepted.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance. On-campus daycare. Remedial services. Member of a national athletic association.
    • Programs: automobile mechanics, motorcycle mechanic, autobody repair, vehicle maintenance, mechanic and repair, diesel mechanics, truck and bus driver, electrical installation and repair
    • Degrees/Certificates: Certificates. Associate’s.
    • Student Body: 919 students, 1,312 full-time equivalent.
    • Flexibility: Weekend classes available. Credit for experience.
    • Notable: Career counseling. Placement assistance.

    Online Medical Billing and Coding Schools, Classes, medical billing college. #Medical #billing #college


    The Cutting Edge of Medicine Medical Billing and Coding!

    M edical Billing and Coding was at one time a career that you could launch by purchasing a book, investing in some computer software, and, once you were confident in your skills, starting a home business with which you provided this valuable service to a group of doctors.

    Billing and coding continues to be a great career opportunity, with pay being considered generous for an entry level job. read more . .

    Featured online schools offering degrees/ certificates:

    Browse Schools that offer online Billing/Coding

    Browse Schools that offer online Billing/Coding

    article continued from above.

    However, trying to educate yourself through methods that avoid college courses or classes may not be the best method of insuring that you will have a job once you have the knowledge. The two terms “billing” and “coding,” actually involve two different jobs which are often performed by the same person. Medical billing involves collecting data for all aspects of a claim, helping to make sure the medical facility is performing efficiently. Coding, on the other hand, is the application of the correct code to every medical procedure used in a particular case. Without correct codes, the insurance companies are unable to make correct, speedy payment. Both jobs require knowledge of medical procedures, anatomy and terminology along with an understanding of how the insurance industry operates.

    The medical field has evolved dramatically over the past 10 to 15 years alone. The arrival of the Affordable Care Act has resulted in complex levels of medical coding; the new CD-10 has changed to available codes from just over 13,000 to 144,000. If the wrong code is entered on a bill, the doctor stands to lose thousands of dollars, both in the cost of refiling and in fines and reductions in payment from the insurance company. In fact, it is possible for a physician to lose his practice because of coding errors. As for lost revenue, Ruthann Russo, executive director of HP3 Healthcare Concepts, says that a review of one 200 physician multi-specialty group revealed that an estimated $10 million was simply lost because staff involved had not correctly billed the services.

    Get Educated

    These changes actually mean that billing and coding is as great a career opportunity as ever; in fact one national survey reports that there are 30% more positions than there are people to fill them, and the shortage is expected to increase. But doctors can no longer afford to take a chance on people who claim to know the business but have no formal training. Doctors are urged to hire personnel with AHIMA or APC certification, who have taken courses with AHIMA approved trainers. You may be expected to take courses in Health Information Management, Pharmacology, and Legal compliance as well as the courses in coding. However, don’t feel overwhelmed. Many schools have designed their programs to be completed in as little as four months. Those who complete the course work, a practicum, and pass the test receive certification and are considered billing and coding specialists.

    Use our convenient service to research the education programs and get started on your own billing and coding career.

    Get Paid

    The pay for a billing/coding specialist varies from state to state but according to the BLS, the mean annual wage for Medical Records and Health Information Technicians overall, is about $38,860.


    Cheap Car Insurance for College Students and Grads, cheap car insurance for college students.

    #Cheap #car #insurance #for #college #students


    Cheap Car Insurance for College Students and Recent Grads

    Cheap car insurance for college studentsCollege students and recent college graduates face a number of big changes, like living in a new area, finding a job, studying for classes and getting their own car insurance. None of these are easy tasks, but Compare.com can help with at least one. We’ve created a guide for cheap car insurance for college students and grads so you can focus on your other tasks (and have some extra money in your pocket too).

    How to find cheap car insurance for college students

    Finding cheap car insurance for college students is certainly a concern, but it’s rarely a top priority. Many college students just get a policy from the same insurance company that their parents use. Some go online and get a quote or two from different car insurance companies. But what’s the best car insurance for college students?

    Luckily, we have several tips. Here’s how to find the cheapest car insurance for college students. Just follow our checklist!

    Car insurance for college students’ policy check-up

    • If you are still on your parent’s car insurance policy, make sure you are a listed as a driver. If not, you may not be covered in the event of an accident.
    • Make sure you are assigned as the primary driver of the car you drive to school.
    • If you have your own policy, make sure your insurance policy reflects where you live and where you garage the vehicle. Address may be a variable that insurance companies use to price policies, plus having it updated makes submitting claims more efficient.
    • If you do not take the car to school, your parents can update the policy to reflect the change in how often the vehicle is being driven and how far. It might even lower car insurance premium since you’re driving less. Many insurance companies refer to this as a distant student discount and require that the college student attends school at least 100 miles away from home.
    • Check the limits on collision, comprehensive and liability coverages. Colleges are densely populated with limited-experience drivers. Thus, accidents are more likely to happen. Checking your coverages in these areas will help ensure that you have the appropriate coverage if an accident occurs.
    • Theft of vehicles and personal items from within vehicles is more common on and near college campuses. Be sure to avoid leaving valuables in vehicles parked around campus. And, of course, always lock your vehicle.

    The best car insurance for college students

    Unfortunately, there is no one absolute cheapest car insurance for college students. However, there is a simple solution: shop around. Every insurance company doesn’t calculate risk the same way, which means prices are different from company to company. Do your homework and get multiple quotes. But who’s got time for that? We can help you expedite your search with a single form that will give you multiple quotes at once. You can compare prices side by side, lock-in your best option, buy and be done.

    Now, what advice do we have for our recent graduates? (P.S. congratulations!)

    What is the best car insurance for recent college graduates?

    Cheap car insurance for college studentsIf you’re a recent college graduate, what can you do to get cheap car insurance when getting your own car insurance policy? The first thing is to make sure that you have a good credit score. A good credit score can get you a better rate on car insurance. Be sure to keep your score up too by paying bills on time and paying overdue debts. Paying off your credit cards will help to you to maintain your current insurance price. On the other hand, falling behind on payments can hurt your credit score. If you get too far behind, your insurance carrier might choose not to renew your policy when your policy expires.

    College grads can combine car insurance and other policies

    Recent college grads will often have several insurance policies such as auto, renters and perhaps life insurance. One way to get cheap car insurance for college graduates is to bundle these policies. Bundling is when you buy multiple types of insurance together from the same insurance company. Not only might bundling decrease your auto insurance premium, but the premium for your other insurance products as well. Plus, it’s one less bill to worry about.

    Getting the best car insurance for college graduates is about knowing what you need

    Not many college grads run out and buy a new car immediately after commencement. Some get a new car from mom and dad, but not many. If you plan on driving your current car for a few years more, take a closer look at the coverage levels. If the car has a few scratches and dings, it might be worth raising the deductible or dropping comprehensive coverage.

    Be careful though, because while you can save money by changing coverage levels and deductibles, you can also get yourself into a tight spot if you don’t have money put aside to deal with any issues that might arise.

    The only way to get the best car insurance for college graduates is to compare prices. Age, driving history and your address are all factors insurance companies may consider when they price your policy. All of these factors are also currently in flux as a recent college grad, especially if you are moving out of state.

    We make comparing car insurance for college students and recent grads easy. Enter your details once and we’ll show you the best options we have!


    US Government Federal Student Loan Programs ~, federal college loans.#Federal #college #loans


    Applying and Qualifying for the Federal Perkins Loans

    For the college bound student looking for financial aid, qualifying for a grant is ideal. But, not all grants will cover the entirety of your tuition costs. When you factor in book costs, dorm fees and the cost of living in general most grants fall short of the mark when it comes to paying all of your college expenses. That’s why student loans play such a major role in financing a college education.

    Federal students loans, with their fixed low interest rates and flexible repayment plans, offer the most attractive solution. The Federal Perkins Loan Program should be a key component in any student’s college financial plan. The Perkins loan offers many benefits and features that make it an excellent source of financial aid for eligible students.

    Features of a Perkins Loan:

    • Low-interest, fixed rate loans
    • Need-based
    • Available through participating colleges and universities
    • Optional loan cancellation for eligible borrowers
    • Available to eligible undergraduate and graduate students
    • 9-Month grace period
    • No application fees
    • No credit checks

    Federal college loans

    What is a Federal Perkins Loan?

    The Federal Perkins Loan is a campus-based financial aid package that is available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Participating colleges and universities receive annual loan allowances from the U.S. Department of Education, and it is from theses funds that the school makes Perkins Loans available to eligible students. These loans are limited number and eligible students are advised to apply early. Perkins loans are free of any application or other hidden fees and offer a 9 month grace period following graduation before repayment must begin.

    Perkins Loan recipients borrow directly from the college campus of their choice. These are subsidized loans, meaning the government pays the interest that accrues on the loan for as long as a students remains in school as well as the 9 month grace period. Under graduate students are limited to loans of $4,000 per year, with a lifetime limit of $20,000. Graduate students are allowed an increased limit of $6,000 per annum, with a $40,000 lifetime limit.

    While many students qualify for the Federal Perkins Loan, not all colleges and universities participate in the program. Check with your college of choice to learn if they are one of the approximately 1700 colleges and universities that do participate in the program. With it’s fixed low interest rates, Federal subsidization and flexible repayment terms the Perkins Loan is the most borrower friendly student loan available.

    Qualifications for a Perkins Loan

    The chief determining factor of a student’s eligibility for the Perkins Loan program is financial need. A student must fall within a certain income bracket and the student’s Expected Family Contribution or EFC must be rated low on the Federal scale. Other application requirements include:

    • Student must be enrolled in an accredited school at least half-time.
    • Student must be enrolled in a college or institution that participates in the program.
    • Student must be a U.S. citizen, a legal permanent resident or an eligible non-citizen.
    • Student must no history of defaulting on prior student loans.
    • Student must be registered with the Selective Service where applicable.
    • Student must meet minimum GPA.

    Federal college loans

    Applying for a Perkins Loan

    All Federal financial aid programs require students to fill out and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. Once you have submitted your FAFSA and it has been reviewed, you will receive your Student Aid Report which details the amount of your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). This is the amount of money you or your family are responsible for contributing to your education.

    Within a few weeks, you should receive follow up letters from the colleges to which you have applied detailing any and all types of financial aid for which you have qualified, including the Perkins Loan. This letter must be returned to the college or university indicating what financial aid you are accepting. If you are approved for a Perkins Loan you must coordinate with your school immediately to secure the loan and receive your financial aid money. Loan funds are limited and the earlier you respond the better your chances of getting the loan you need.

    Repayment of the Perkins Loan

    During the final weeks of your college term your school will contact you and provide loan repayment details relative to your Perkins Loan. You will have the benefit of a 9 month grace period in which to become settled and find a job before any repayment schedule begins. This grace period is one of the major bonuses of the Federal Perkins Loan program, allowing students some time to enter the workforce before any loan payments must be made.

    Loan Cancellation for Teachers

    A significant benefit of the Federal Perkins Loan program is the Cancellation or Deferment Option for Teachers. Students who agree to take up full time teaching positions in low-income public school districts, or take positions teaching in certain subject areas may be eligible for cancellation or deferment of all or part of your Perkins loan. Check with your college for more information regarding any deferment or loan forgiveness programs for which you may be eligible.



    FinAid! Financial Aid, College Scholarships and Student Loans, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


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    Paperwork demystified — find forms and instructions here. Tips on filling out the FAFSA and maximizing eligibility.

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    ‘Ask the Aid Advisor’ for personalized help. Read the financial aid FAQ and glossary for other answers.

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    Parents, Don – t Co-Sign Student Loans! Student Debt Survivor, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    Parents, Don t Co-Sign Student Loans!

    A few weeks ago I received an e-mail from a reader who was curious about my take on parents co-signing student loans with their kids. The reader was considering co-signing for a large student loan so that her daughter could attend a very expensive private university. The mom asked me if I thought it was a good idea for her to co-sign for the loan with her daughter, as the school was her daughter s, dream school and she didn t want her to be disappointed if she couldn t afford to attend the school with savings and scholarships alone. Here s what I told her:

    Short answer: NO!

    Longer answer: NOOOOOOOO!

    Just kidding, my response was much kinder and and hopefully much more helpful than that. All jokes aside, I think that having your parents co-sign your loans (Parent Plus loans, private loans or otherwise) is a terrible idea. Many of my friends parents co-signed for their student loans and later regretted their decision to do so. Basically, they feel like they helped their kids saddle themselves with thousands of dollars in student loan debt when they, knew better. The, kids , who are not adults with kids of their own, regret bothering so much money and dragging my parents down with me.

    Strangely, many students (and their parents) are willing to sign up for tens (and hundreds) of thousands of dollars of student loan debt to help themselves get ahead. They believe that student debt is, good debt and you can t get a good job without an expensive degree. Those people are wrong! But don t worry, I m not just pointing the finger at you, I m also pointing it right back at myself. I m one of those people who borrowed $30,000 to attend college and grad school. Today I m incredibly thankful that my parents didn t co-sign for my mistake.

    Just say, No! to co-signing student loans:

    If your daughter can t afford to attend school without a co-signer, her school is too expensive!

    I know school is expensive and I d imagine that it s really hard to tell your child she can t afford her dream school. But if the dream school is out of her (and your) budget, maybe she should consider attending a cheaper university? 20 years from now will it matter she went to Boston College or University of Massachusetts? I doubt it.

  • Thanksgiving dinner tastes bad when you re, playing bank .

    Just imagine how awkward it will be sitting across the table from your adult daughter when you have a large outstanding debt together. Even if she s financially responsible and paying down the student loan debt expeditiously, you ll still feel annoyed when she buys a new car instead of paying off the remaining balance of the debt that you owe together.

  • When your kid can t get a job, you re stuck paying back the loans.

    Let s face it, the economy hasn t been that great over the past few years. Even if your child is a whiz kid, there s no guarantee that he ll get a job immediately after college.

  • Not everyone who starts college finishes.

    If your kid drops out of school and doesn t finish the degree, you re still on the hook for the bill. Have you seen the stats lately about college drop-outs? If your kid dropped out of college how would that impact your relationship? I suspect you d pay that monthly bill pretty begrudgingly when your son drops out of school and you re stuck paying the bill.

  • You might be hurting your own financial future.

    If you have to co-sign a loan (instead of giving your kid cash), can you really afford the payments you re signing up for? If you re putting yourself in financial jeopardy to help your kids finance college, you shouldn t be co-signing student loans. Helping your kids sign up for debt isn t really a blessing and might actually be a curse. Plus, if you can t afford to retire you may have to rely on your kids to support you.

  • Don t get me wrong, I know there are situations where parents have helped their kids by co-signing a student loan and everything was fine. The loan was paid back quickly and it didn t impact the family dynamics, or the parents finances. But I also know a lot of people who are in really bad financial situations and completely regret co-signing a loan with a parent or family member.

    Pay for school without parent plus loans:

    Chose a cheaper university.

    Check the costs at your local community college, in-state college and private universities (sometimes private schools end up being cheaper than public schools if you get a big scholarship. Check out this post for more details).

  • Take off a year to work.

    Stay at home, get a bunch of jobs, and hustle until you can afford the tuition at the school you want to attend. Work is a good way to build character, decide which career path you want to take (and which you don t!) and learn about life in the real world.

  • Work while you attend school.

    I worked throughout college. Take a look at this post for some of my favorite ways college students can make money while they re still in school.

  • Live at home.

    If you can afford the tuition, but can t afford the room and board, consider living at home and commuting to school. Depending on where you live, this could save you thousands of dollars per year in room and board.

  • Scholarships.

    Apply early and send out as many applications as you can. Your guidance or college counseling office should have a list of local scholarships. They should also be able to direct you to the websites where you can apply to national scholarships. Hint: don t ever pay anyone money to get a list of scholarships being offered-this information is free and widely available.



  • Information About Going to College, Before College, During College, After College Information, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    Students Parents

    Created especially for students of every age who are looking for information about going to college, this area of our website has all your answers. Although it was written with students in mind, parents of college-bound students will find this information helpful, too. Plus, there s a link below for parent-specific topics.

    ISAC Student Portal

    College loans for parents

    Create an ISAC Student Portal profile and access information about your ISAC programs. If you are a member of the Illinois National Guard, the Portal is where you complete, submit and check on the status of your application, keep track of the eligibility units you have received and print a copy of your most recent Notice of Eligibility.

    Before College

    If you re considering college or already making plans to go, Before College is where you ll find the information to get started. You can research colleges and careers, learn about the college admission process and get help in choosing the school that s right for you. This is also where we explain how and when to take the first step in the financial aid process by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA ). Meet our ISACorps members, deployed across the state and offering free presentations and one-on-one assistance for students and families navigating the college-going and financial aid process.

    During College

    During College is where you’ll learn about ways to pay for college, including through the programs administered by ISAC. ISAC program applications are located in this area, as well as detailed information about the available grant, scholarship and loan programs.

    After College

    Use After College to help make the transition from college to career. Get tips on finding a job and establishing a budget, and learn how to start the process of paying back your students loans and fulfilling the commitments attached to scholarships and/or grants you may have received.

    Parents

    The Parents area supplements the three sections listed above by providing parent-specific information that will assist you as you help your child navigate the college process.

    Espa ol

    En esta secci n encontrar s la informaci n en espa ol que necesitas para ingresar a la universidad, recursos de ayuda financiera, entender los pasos en c mo solicitar para la ayuda financiera para pagar la universidad.

    Student Parent Quick Links

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    Hillsdale College – Parents, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    PARENTS

    Becoming a Hillsdale student is a wonderful testimony to your child’s achievements and character. We’re grateful for all you’ve done, and invite you to keep playing an active part. Join our Parents Association, attend Parents Weekend, and read our Parents Newsletter. Follow the links below to learn more.

    Financial Aid at Hillsdale

    Hillsdale costs significantly less than other nationally ranked, private liberal arts colleges—even though we refuse to accept even one penny of federal or state financial aid for student grants, loans, and scholarships. Our generous financial aid packages are made possible by gifts from donors across the nation: people who proudly share our principles of independence and self-government.

    Independence

    College loans for parents

    Why is Hillsdale College’s independence so important?

    Hillsdale was the first American college to prohibit by charter admissions discrimination based on race, sex, or religion. Standing on principle continues to define us. By refusing even one penny of federal or state aid for student grants, awards, loans, or scholarships, we can be a truly independent institution—one not beholden to government regulations that conflict with our educational mission.

    Value

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    How does Hillsdale College’s value measure up?

    Hillsdale is consistently among the top colleges in best value rankings by The Princeton Review, Kiplinger’s, Forbes, and others. Thanks to the generosity of donors who share our principles of independence, integrity, and self-government, we can offer financial aid packages to 96 percent of our students, with an average aid package of $17,260. Hillsdale donors also make possible a wealth of other educational opportunities, including the largest college lecture series in America.

    Liberal Arts

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    Why are the classical liberal arts relevant?

    Our world will change—what it means to be human will not. We ask our students to grapple with the timeless truths and enduring questions of the Western Tradition. This develops a foundation for the rest of their lives, from their choice of major to their choice of career.

    The Parents Association

    The Parents Association helps students and the College through fundraising, recruitment, and helping build awareness of everything Hillsdale does. We encourage parents of any currently enrolled Hillsdale student to help us tell more people about what makes Hillsdale a great choice—and unique in the nation.



    College loans for parents, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    Loans

    Direct federal loans are a form of financial aid available to assist undergraduate students attending college at least half-time. Students may use the funds to pay for tuition, books, and living expenses. Loans must be repaid at a low fixed-rate.

    Interest Rates

    To be eligible for Federal Loans you must :

    • be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen;
    • be registered with Selective Service, if you’re a male (you must register between the ages of 18 and 25);
    • be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a regular student in an eligible degree or certificate program;
    • be enrolled at least half-time to be eligible for Direct Loan Program funds;
    • maintain satisfactory academic progress in college or career school;
    • sign statements on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) stating that you are not in default on a federal student loan and do not owe money on a federal student grant and you will use federal student aid only for educational purposes; and show you’re qualified to obtain a college or career school education by having a high school diploma or a recognized equivalent such as a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or completing a high school education in a homeschool setting approved under state law

    A loan based on financial need for which the federal government pays the interest that accrues while the borrower is in an in-school, grace, or deferment status. For Direct Subsidized Loans first disbursed between July 1, 2012 and July 1, 2014, the borrower will be responsible for paying any interest that accrues during the grace period. If the interest is not paid during the grace period, the interest will be added to the loan’s principle balance.

    A loan for which the borrower is fully responsible for paying the interest regardless of the loan status. Interest on unsubsidized loans accrues from the date of disbursement and continues through the life of the loan.

    A loan available parents of dependent undergraduate students for which the borrower is fully responsible for paying the interest regardless of the loan status.



    FinAid! Financial Aid, College Scholarships and Student Loans, college loans for students.#College #loans #for #students


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    The SmartStudent TM Guide

    to Financial Aid

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    Paperwork demystified — find forms and instructions here. Tips on filling out the FAFSA and maximizing eligibility.

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    ‘Ask the Aid Advisor’ for personalized help. Read the financial aid FAQ and glossary for other answers.

    College loans for students

    Dozens of tools for calculating college costs, loan payments, savings, and the expected family contribution (EFC).

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    Helping Vermont Students Prepare For College, college loans for students.#College #loans #for #students


    college loans for students

    Fixed-rate parent student loans—as low as 5.8% APR

    Go green!

    With e-statements and automatic debit. Login or register for MyVSAC and choose e-statements.

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    Upcoming Events

    Financial Aid Forms Workshop: Enosburg Falls High School

    6:00pm – 8:00pm Enosburg Falls High School

    Join us for a free Financial Aid Forms workshop. At this informal workshop, we will assist you as you file your FAFSA and Vermont state grant applications.

    College loans for students

    Financial Aid Forms Workshop: River Bend Career Technical Center

    5:00pm – 8:00pm River Bend Career Technical Center

    Join us for a free Financial Aid Forms workshop. At this informal workshop, we will assist you as you file your FAFSA and Vermont state grant applications.

    College loans for students

    FAFSA Help: VSAC helpline walk-in assistance 11/16/17

    4:00pm – 8:00pm VSAC Resource Center in Winooski

    Will you be filing a FAFSA? The Free Application for Federal Student Aid is your pathway to funding for the education and career training after high school. Every student should file!

    College loans for students

    Learn About VHEIP: Oak Grove School Open House

    5:30pm – 7:00pm Oak Grove School

    VHEIP will be at the fall Open House for parents and students at Oak Grove School in Brattleboro on Thursday, November 16 from 5:30 to 7:00pm to give away free piggy banks or backpacks and speak with parents about how they can save and pay for college.

    College loans for students



    The Best College Loan for Students, college loan.#College #loan


    The Best College Loan for Students

    As recently as the early 1990s, most students did not take out college loans. Today about two out of every three students borrow to pay for college due to the runaway cost of college.

    The typical student borrower is now leaving school with debt of $29,400. Just the outstanding federal college loan debt now exceeds credit-card debt.

    Is $29,400 a reasonable amount of student debt?

    It depends on what types of student loans an undergraduate selects. The level of debt will be more manageable if the student only borrows via federal student loans. For most students that will mean obtaining federal Direct Subsidized College loanLoans and Direct Unsubsidized Loans. You will also see them referred to as Stafford Loans.

    Federal Student Loans

    Here is why these direct federal loans are superior:

    The federal Direct Subsidized and Unsubsidized Loans are designed strictly for students. Borrowers must begin repaying these loans shortly after graduating or leaving college.

    Subsidized Vs. Unsubsidized Loans

    The interest rate on both the subsidized and the unsubsidized federal loans for the 2014-2015 school year will be 4.66%, which is higher than the previous year s rate of 3.86%. The interest rates are linked to the 10-year U.S. Treasury note.

    The best loan to get is the Direct Subsidized Loan. Students who qualify for this one don’t have to pay the interest that accrues while they are enrolled in college. The federal government pays this interest. In contrast, borrowers through the unsubsidized Stafford are responsible for covering the interest that accrues while in college.

    Qualifying for a Direct Subsidized Loan

    Your college will tell you if your child qualifies for the subsidized loan. Look at the financial aid package that your teenager receives to see what the breakdown is between subsidized versus unsubsidized Stafford loans.

    A federal formula is used to determine if a student, based on a family’s finances, is eligible for the better subsidized deal. The majority of subsidized federal loans are awarded to students whose family’s adjusted gross income is less than $50,000.

    You may see both kinds of direct loans in your package.

    Federal Loan Borrowing Limits

    Here is a federal chart that outlines how much students can borrow. The left-hand column shows the maximum amount that traditional (i.e. dependent) college students can borrow. Here is the definition of independent students.

    The other column shows how much independent students , as well as dependent students whose parents were denied a federal PLUS Loan. Students whose parents could not obtain the PLUS Loan can borrow up to $57,500.

    If a student takes the traditional four years to graduate from college, the maximum he/she can borrow will be $27,000. If the student needs longer to graduate with a bachelor s degree he/she can only borrow an additional $4,000.

    College loan

    When should I apply for my federal student loan?

    The new year for federal student loans starts July 1. So if your child will begin college in the fall, you would apply for the loan sometime after July 1.

    Your child s school will notify you of the loan amounts that it is offering in an award letter.

    You should evaluate the aid offer carefully. Keep in mind that whatever amount you borrow must be paid back with interest. If your living expenses are not as high as those projected by your school, you should not borrow as much as the amount in the award letter.

    To get an idea of what monthly loan payments will be after graduation, take a look at the federal repayment calculator.

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    Why You Should NOT Take Out Student Loans for College – ReadyForZero Blog, college student loans.#College #student #loans


    Why You Should NOT Take Out Student Loans for College

    College student loans

    Welcome to the 5th Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero! To see the other side of this debate, read Dominique s post: Why You Should Take Out Student Loans for College. And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

    This post is written by Kelli Space, a student loan advocate and personal finance enthusiast who writes about her own student loan experience at twohundredthou.com. She is also the co-founder of Zero Bound, an online platform that aims to help students and alumni pay off their student loans through sponsored volunteering. She has a BA in Sociology from Northeastern University and believes more (affordable) education is in her near future.

    College student loansLast year, student loan debt surpassed credit card debt. 1 This year, student loan debt topped $1 trillion dollars. 2 While this says a lot about the emphasis Americans are placing on education, the high cost of college suggests it may be time to question the return on investment of your college degree.

    Full disclosure: I believe in education. The power of being informed runs deep and has a profound impact on society through scientific advancements, international discussions, cultural understanding, and even in ways one can’t anticipate. Learning should never cease.

    However, is “attending college” the only way to continue to learn? It certainly looks great on a resume, but is it the only way to gauge one’s ability to complete tasks or capacity to answer a question? I don’t have the answer to that, but what I can address is the amount of money students are borrowing to obtain their degrees. College costs money. And, when colleges are being run like businesses, the students are the consumers. They have the freedom of choice.

    To that end, here are my reasons why borrowing money for school might not be the best idea:

    Get offers for lower-interest rate debt consolidation loans here on ReadyForZero!

    College student loans

    No Proof of Ability to Pay the Money Back

    Private loans are lent by banks, and banks have one job – to make money. When they lend money, it is because they will make even more money back in interest. Further, student loan debt cannot be discharged in bankruptcy except in cases of extreme hardship and, even if a borrower defaults, the government guarantees the loans and will ensure the bank is paid back.

    This means banks have no reason to qualify their borrowers based on anything other than their need.

    As a borrower, however, you have every reason to consider how much you’re borrowing and how much money you will probably earn. Do you think you’ll be able to pay your loans off in a reasonable amount of time without serious sacrifice on your part? Even so, while the government might guarantee these private loans, nothing guarantees that you will graduate with a job.

    “Thank God I Have Student Loan Debt!”

    College has indeed made it possible to achieve personal and social greatness. Some people are indirectly grateful for their debt because it took them places, and made the impossible possible – but there is a tipping point that has been disregarded and that s what we need to evaluate.

    Account for Change

    Borrowing money is a serious, unwavering commitment. What if something changes? Similar to not being able to guarantee that you’ll have a job – what if you want to change your major to something less lucrative (but more fulfilling)? What if you have to take a leave of absence from school? These “what-ifs”, and more, are absolutely something to consider.

    Many, many students are paying back their loans for 20, 25, or 30 years into the future. Heck, as of July 2012, nearly 16% of people over the age of 50 are carrying student loan debt 3 , and they went to school when it was cheap. To be fair, many of them might be carrying debt on behalf of their children as they could have cosigned the loans. But, 16% of $1 trillion is $160 billion. Actually, this leads to another issue: putting your parents in a weird, debt-owing spot when they have their own retirement to worry about!

    Other Options

    Again, education is important. And largely it does require sacrifice from many students and families as the cost is quickly rising ($50K a year!?) Some of these sacrifices though, when combined, could put you ahead of the game.

    For instance, working throughout high school, and perhaps for a year between high school and college, may help you save a good chunk of your future tuition. Maybe that year off can also help you gain some perspective in terms of your future – career, location, et al. Imagine starting college armed with $10K? You’re welcome, Mom Dad. Volunteering and/or interning in addition to your job may aid in giving you valuable insight to what your interests might be, and what you’d like your future to look like. At least you’ll know what you are working toward from that point!

    “Cheap” (pshhhh) college for a year or two can help to keep you on track while you work, save, and/or volunteer. Taking a few mandatory courses at community college for a fraction of the cost than that of a 4-year school will also wind up saving you future money, if you do end up having to borrow for school.

    I borrowed quite a lot of money for my Bachelor’s degree, and know how it feels to be in life-halting debt, so I may sound a bit biased. On the contrary I do think borrowing for college is necessary a lot of the time considering the high cost of these institutions – perhaps not $200K worth, but the average debt load is just about 10% of that, at $25K. This is still a lot of money, but can be quite manageable depending on your salary. If you work at a not-for-profit or in certain urban areas, you may also be able to have your federal loans forgiven after a certain period of time, and bear in mind that federal loans are far more flexible than private loans.

    Never stop learning. The internet has been a great tool for exactly that – and libraries, museums, and meeting groups exist for the same purpose. Exploring your interests and forming educated opinions are part of what has propelled our society into advancement. We’re counting on our future generations to worry less about debt and more about making this world a much better place.

    1. Source: Student loans surpass auto, credit card debt Washington Post, March 2012 [ ]
    2. Source: Student Loan Debt Tops $1 Trillion Wall Street Journal, March 2012 [ ]
    3. Source: Nearly 16% of Post-50s Are Carrying Student Loan Debt Huffington Post, July 2012 [ ]

    College student loans

    This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.



    Can Students Pay Off Their Loans? Delinquency On College Debt Soars Above That Of Credit Cards, Mortgages, loans for college students.#Loans #for #college #students


    Can Students Pay Off Their Loans? Delinquency On College Debt Soars Above That Of Credit Cards, Mortgages

    Loans for college students

    Graduates-to-be walked before their commencement ceremony at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, May 12, 2017. Photo: Reuters

    After increasing for 11 straight quarters, aggregate household debt toppled the previous peak in 2008, reaching a total of $12.73 trillion in the first three months of 2017, according to a quarterly report released Wednesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. That total is 14 percent above the valley formed by the drop in household debt that followed the Great Recession, the result of a decrease in borrowing in the wake of the credit collapse.

    That’s not necessarily a bad thing, as the New York Times noted soon after the Fed report’s release. It signifies consumers’ greater access to credit, a harbinger of healthy economic growth and activity. But the report also harbored a real cause for concern, specifically for millennials. While aggregate student loan debt only made up 11 percent of the total — compared to mortgages, with 68 percent of household debt — the average delinquency rate for student loans has shot above all other forms of debt in recent years, and stayed there, according to the Fed report.

    The rise in aggregate mortgage loans may represent a comeback for the housing market, as that delinquency rate has plummeted to below 4 percent from its 2009 peak of over 12 percent. For serious delinquencies, or those of at least 90 days, the rate is closer to 1 percent, the Fed found.

    Student loans, by contrast, continued a dramatic rise in delinquencies that began about a dozen years earlier, with the rate of missed payments lingering around 10 percent today, up from around 8 percent in 2004. The rate of student loan delinquencies longer than 90 days has come close to 10 percent as well, up from under 6 percent in 2004. In terms of delinquency rates, the student debt category was followed by auto loans, with below 8 percent, and credit cards, with about 6 percent.

    There is a litany of reasons for the disparity, according to Melinda Kay Lewis, an associate professor of practice at the University of Kansas’ School of Social Welfare. For starters, she said, the average financial profile of the student borrower makes that type of debt “a very different animal” from, say, mortgage debt, owed by Americans who are generally older and more financially stable. Buying a house, she added, might appear as less imperative than buying the upward mobility that colleges are purported to provide.

    “For many students, it’s either no student loan financing or no school at all,” Lewis said. “People are really caught — they know that they need higher education to advance economically, but they have little ways to pay.”

    Student debt stood at a staggering nearly $1.44 trillion as of the first quarter, and the total — along with the delinquency rates noted in the Fed report — is bound to swell further.

    Much of the Fed’s response to the economic fallout of the Great Recession involved lowering its policy interest rate, the federal funds rate, which gave borrowers some relief by pushing interest rates on various forms of debt to follow suit. But to have a proper response to the next financial crisis, whenever it may be, the Fed needs to move its policy rate back up to what Fed Chair Janet Yellen often refers to as a “neutral” level of up to 3 percent, up from its current bandwidth of between 0.75 and 1 percent. (The central bank dropped the federal funds rate to nearly zero from above 5 percent in the wake of the recession, and has been raising it in 0.25-percent increments since December 2015.)

    Students with fixed interest rates or federal student loans taken out prior to 2006 have little to worry about, but the same can’t be said for other student borrowers.

    Yellen is expected to announce another increase in the rate at the conclusion of its monetary policy-making body’s next meeting, on June 14, after she said in a press conference that the Fed would delay a hike at its previous meeting in May.

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    Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen spoke during a news conference after a two day Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting in Washington, D.C., March 15, 2017. Photo: Reuters

    Seeking to mitigate the issue ahead of the next Fed meeting, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) reintroduced a bill Wednesday that would permit student loan borrowers to refinance at current federal loan interest rates.

    “With interest rates scheduled to rise again this summer,” a press release announcing the measure noted, “the urgency for Congress to address the student debt crisis and to allow borrowers to access today’s lower rates is stronger than ever.”

    While it’s garnered widespread Democratic support, the bill’s previous iterations have fielded criticism for leaving out distressed borrowers, who likely wouldn’t qualify for refinancing, and forcing borrowers to pay a 0.5 percent fee that would come with a refinance.

    Loans for college students

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren spoke at an “Our Revolution” rally in Boston, March 31, 2017. Photo: Reuters

    For Lewis, the associate professor, a better answer would be a full transformation of how students pay for college, rather than smaller, patchwork remedies that end up leaving many students behind and don’t address the root of the problem.

    More scrutiny and awareness of the risks involved with for-profit colleges — which account for a disproportionate amount of student debt — earlier, “front-end” investing in kids’ educations and a revamp in public funding of public colleges would be a good start, Lewis said.

    After all, delinquency rates, she noted, are often higher for students with smaller loans who didn’t attend elite, big-name institutions, and are therefore seeing little return on their investment.

    “We have students from community colleges who can’t pay off their debt,” Lewis said, adding that the ramifications of college unaffordability for the broader economy could be detrimental. “One of my greatest fears with the student debt issue is that students will look around them and decide that the risk is too much.”



    5 Ways to Repay Your College Loans Fast, college loans.#College #loans


    5 ways to repay your student loans fast

    College loans

    The Nice LifePic/Shutterstock.com

    Getting out from under college loan debt

    If there’s one obstacle that prevents most millennials from investing, it’s the burden of college loans.

    The average student debt for 2016 graduates is a record $37,172, up 6.05% from a year earlier, according to Mark Kantrowitz, publisher and vice president of strategy for Cappex.com, a college scholarship website.

    So how can graduates get out from under that debt quickly? We spoke to investment managers and financial planners for their top tips to become free of student loans.

    College loans

    Treat the loan like a mortgage

    If you can afford it, treat the loan like a mortgage and simply make larger payments to cut the principal more quickly, says financial planner Allan Katz, CFP professional, president of Comprehensive Wealth Management Group in New York’s Staten Island.

    For example, a $25,000 student loan with 6.8% interest with a 10-year payback period would cost $288 a month. Paying $700 a month instead of $288 enables the borrower to repay the loan in just over three years, Katz says.

    Another strategy is adding payments and sending in checks every two weeks rather than monthly.

    Once that college loan is repaid, the benefits proliferate. “It’s one less debt you owe. The money you make is now free to be invested and applied to owning a house, saving for retirement or putting a child through college,” Katz says.

    College loans

    Create a 3- to 5-year plan

    Clayton Shearer, a wealth manager at A I Financial Services in Englewood, Colorado, urges clients to create a three- to five-year plan to pare college debt.

    Knowing exactly when the loan ends is comforting for many clients. Clients “have a goal in place, they’re committed to it and they know exactly what to pay monthly,” Shearer says.

    For example, two clients had $50,000 combined in college debt and were making around $100,000 a year jointly. To pay it off, they established a budget and cut back on spending. Their budget was helped by two sizable bonuses from work, resulting in their sending $800 per month for two years to cancel their college debt. Had they not prepaid, it would have taken about 15 years to pay off the loan.

    College loans

    Hero Images/Getty Images

    Establish a college repayment fund

    Having money moved automatically into savings is effective because it’s forced, Katz says. It enables people to set aside money to grow that otherwise would be spent on clothes or dining out, Katz says.

    Just make sure to set up an account that will be used only for paying back your college debt. Don’t use checking or savings accounts you already have because you might use that money for something other than your student loan.

    College loans

    Start early with a part-time job in college

    Getting a part-time job while attending college is one way to keep college debt in check because it generates money to help offset student loans.

    If a student can put away $1,000 a month, “that’s $12,000 (a year) less in student loans and not having to take that money out in loans — a big savings,” Shearer says.

    College loans

    Hero Images/Getty Images

    Avoid the usual traps

    The most compelling barrier stopping people from repaying loans faster is the need for “instant gratification,” Shearer says. People can lose sight of their future financial goals, live for today and “fall off the budgetary wagon,” he says. The most effective way to reduce debt is to plan ahead, make some sacrifices, focus on future financial goals and delay instant gratification.

    Katz agrees. Maintaining financial discipline is a difficult hurdle for many people, he says. “Most people don’t have the discipline to save. Most people spend like goldfish eat, which is nonstop,” Katz says.

    The people who succeed at cutting college debt are those who “live within their own means and are conscientious about saving,” Katz says.



    Applying for College Student Loans ~, college loans.#College #loans


    Student Loans Explained

    Most students rely on a variety of funding sources to pay for college. Personal savings and family contributions are one of the first places students turn, but often these resources don’t cover higher- education costs.

    Scholarships and grants are windfalls for college funding, because they do not require repayment. Performance and financial need are considered, and then eligible students are endowed with gifts that pay for tuition, books and housing. Do not leave free money on the table – apply for every grant and scholarship for which you qualify.

    Loans are the most common funding sources for college: According to the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), 65% of four-year undergraduate students take out student loans to help them pay for college. But unlike some other resources, loans must be paid back. Loans, and associated interestcosts, typically keep graduates in debt for 10 years or more.

    College loans

    Types of Student Loans

    Student loans are funded by a variety of sources including The United States Federal Government and private lenders like banks and credit unions. Federal loans are the most accessible to students, and offer the best repayment terms.

    Private loans, also referred to as personal loans and alternative loans can be difficult for students to secure without cosigners. Interest rates are higher than federal student loans, but still fall below most other types of private financing (home, car, etc.)

    Federal Student Loans

    The Federal Family Education Loan program (FFEL) is a now-defunct lending program designed to provide American college students and their families with federally backed student loans. These loans are now made through the U.S. Department of Education’s Direct Loan Program.

    These distinct types of loans are available to students and parents seeking Federal Financial Aid:

    • Subsidized Stafford Loans are available to students who demonstrate financial need. Payments are not required while you are enrolled in school, or during grace periods and deferment periods. Interest rates vary, but are currently 3.4%. Loan limits move on a sliding scale, based on what year you are in college; ranging from $5,500 annually, for first year students to $7,500, for third year students and beyond.
    • Unsubsidized Stafford Loans do not require students to show a particular level of financial need. Interest accrues on these loans from the moment the funds are issued, and students are given the choice to pay as they go, or add accumulated interest to the total amount owed following school. Loan limits match those of Subsidized Stafford Loans, but interest rates are higher; currently fixed at 6.8%.

    To be considered for Stafford Loans and other Federal Student Aid, you must submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Repayment begins six-months after graduation, and is governed by repayment schedules ranging in length from 10 to 25 years.

    Perkins loans are federally funded loans administered directly by your institution of higher education College loans(IHE). The loans are extended to students who have the greatest financial need. In general, families with annual incomes below $25,000 are eligible for Perkins Loans.

    These three factors determine the size of your Perkins Loan:

    1. When you apply
    2. Your level of financial need
    3. Funding level at your school

    The maximum annual loan for undergraduate students is $5500, with a lifetime loan maximum of $27,000. Graduate students can borrow up to $8000 each year, with a $60,000 lifetime cap.

    Perkins Loan repayment starts 9 months following graduation, witha fixed 5% interest rate.

    Parents of dependent undergraduatestudents can borrow money under this federal program. Borrowers must be able to pass a credit check, and the student whose education is being funded must be a dependent that meets these minimum requirements:

    Parents access PLUS loans by filing an application, and signing a Master Promissory Note (MPN). Interest rates are fixed at 7.9%, and borrowing limits are determined by subtracting all other financial aid award amounts from the total cost of attending school.

    For students holding multiple federal loans, this program facilitates combining them into a single loan. A single monthly payment replaces the need to pay each loan individually, and the repayment terms of the loan can be extended for up to 30 years.

    Students considering this loan should pay close attention to how their total repayment costs might be affected. Consolidating and extending the repayment schedule of your loans can add considerable costs to your total obligation.

    State Student Loans

    State-specific funding varies – some have none, while others have a great deal. Your FAFSA places you in contention for some state loans, but other programs require separate enrollment. Your high-school guidance counselor and college financial aid office are equipped to sort out the specifics for your state.

    You can also find valuable information on state higher education websites. In Minnesota, for example, students are eligible for loans, under a program called SELF.

    SELF is not subsidized, so worthy credit is required for getting a loan. Minnesota residents who attend participating colleges are eligible to borrow up to $10,000 each year, at a fixed rate of 7.25%. Cosigners provide credit reinforcement that enables students with limited credit to apply.

    Private Student Loans

    Private student loans, such as those offered by Wells Fargo and Chase are designed to bridge the gap between your financial aid package and the true cost of your education. Private loans require borrowersto pass credit checks, and the loans often have higher interest rates than those subsidized by the U.S. Government.

    Cosigners who are willing to share responsibility for your loan provide the credit resources you need to get private financing. Federal Student Loans should be considered first, but used appropriately; private loans can effectively pay for extra educational costs, without creating unmanageable financial burdens.

    Institutional Student Loans

    Institutional loans are extended by colleges and universities as a means to cover educational costs that remain after other forms of financial aid have been applied. Long-term and short-term institutional loans are used to pay for books, room and board, and other student expenses.

    Institutional loans are by definition campus-specific, so interest rates and repayment terms are determined by each educator. Your financial aid office is best equipped to outline specific programs offered by your school.

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    Managing Your Student Loans

    Apply these responsible financial management principles, as you repay your student loans:

    • Consider the advantages of loan forgiveness programs. These programs are available to students who agree to work in high-need fields like nursing and education. Enrolling in the military often makes you eligible for loan forgiveness. Essentially, you commit to work or serve for a designated period of time, in exchange for complete or partial loan forgiveness.
    • Make student loan payments on time. In some cases, your interest rate may qualify for reduction after you make a certain number of consecutive on-time payments. If you have a cosigner, he or she may be released from responsibility for the loan, once you have exhibited a required level of consistency with your repayments. Defaulting on your student loans has far-reaching consequences, so it is never an option.
    • Manage your loan repayment schedule using online calculators. If you are considering a consolidation loan, use these tools to quickly determine your total loan repayment obligation.
    • Take advantage of federal education tax incentives, like the student loan interest deduction and Hope Scholarship Credit.


    FinAid! Financial Aid, College Scholarships and Student Loans, loans for college.#Loans #for #college


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    College loans for parents, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    Loans

    Direct federal loans are a form of financial aid available to assist undergraduate students attending college at least half-time. Students may use the funds to pay for tuition, books, and living expenses. Loans must be repaid at a low fixed-rate.

    Interest Rates

    To be eligible for Federal Loans you must :

    • be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen;
    • be registered with Selective Service, if you’re a male (you must register between the ages of 18 and 25);
    • be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a regular student in an eligible degree or certificate program;
    • be enrolled at least half-time to be eligible for Direct Loan Program funds;
    • maintain satisfactory academic progress in college or career school;
    • sign statements on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) stating that you are not in default on a federal student loan and do not owe money on a federal student grant and you will use federal student aid only for educational purposes; and show you’re qualified to obtain a college or career school education by having a high school diploma or a recognized equivalent such as a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or completing a high school education in a homeschool setting approved under state law

    A loan based on financial need for which the federal government pays the interest that accrues while the borrower is in an in-school, grace, or deferment status. For Direct Subsidized Loans first disbursed between July 1, 2012 and July 1, 2014, the borrower will be responsible for paying any interest that accrues during the grace period. If the interest is not paid during the grace period, the interest will be added to the loan’s principle balance.

    A loan for which the borrower is fully responsible for paying the interest regardless of the loan status. Interest on unsubsidized loans accrues from the date of disbursement and continues through the life of the loan.

    A loan available parents of dependent undergraduate students for which the borrower is fully responsible for paying the interest regardless of the loan status.



    Information About Going to College, Before College, During College, After College Information, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    Students Parents

    Created especially for students of every age who are looking for information about going to college, this area of our website has all your answers. Although it was written with students in mind, parents of college-bound students will find this information helpful, too. Plus, there s a link below for parent-specific topics.

    ISAC Student Portal

    College loans for parents

    Create an ISAC Student Portal profile and access information about your ISAC programs. If you are a member of the Illinois National Guard, the Portal is where you complete, submit and check on the status of your application, keep track of the eligibility units you have received and print a copy of your most recent Notice of Eligibility.

    Before College

    If you re considering college or already making plans to go, Before College is where you ll find the information to get started. You can research colleges and careers, learn about the college admission process and get help in choosing the school that s right for you. This is also where we explain how and when to take the first step in the financial aid process by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA ). Meet our ISACorps members, deployed across the state and offering free presentations and one-on-one assistance for students and families navigating the college-going and financial aid process.

    During College

    During College is where you’ll learn about ways to pay for college, including through the programs administered by ISAC. ISAC program applications are located in this area, as well as detailed information about the available grant, scholarship and loan programs.

    After College

    Use After College to help make the transition from college to career. Get tips on finding a job and establishing a budget, and learn how to start the process of paying back your students loans and fulfilling the commitments attached to scholarships and/or grants you may have received.

    Parents

    The Parents area supplements the three sections listed above by providing parent-specific information that will assist you as you help your child navigate the college process.

    Espa ol

    En esta secci n encontrar s la informaci n en espa ol que necesitas para ingresar a la universidad, recursos de ayuda financiera, entender los pasos en c mo solicitar para la ayuda financiera para pagar la universidad.

    Student Parent Quick Links

    College loans for parents



    FinAid! Financial Aid, College Scholarships and Student Loans, student loans for college.#Student #loans #for #college


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    Paperwork demystified — find forms and instructions here. Tips on filling out the FAFSA and maximizing eligibility.

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    ‘Ask the Aid Advisor’ for personalized help. Read the financial aid FAQ and glossary for other answers.

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    Helping Vermont Students Prepare For College, college loans for students.#College #loans #for #students


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    Fixed-rate parent student loans—as low as 5.8% APR

    Go green!

    With e-statements and automatic debit. Login or register for MyVSAC and choose e-statements.

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    Upcoming Events

    Financial Aid Forms Workshop: Enosburg Falls High School

    6:00pm – 8:00pm Enosburg Falls High School

    Join us for a free Financial Aid Forms workshop. At this informal workshop, we will assist you as you file your FAFSA and Vermont state grant applications.

    College loans for students

    Financial Aid Forms Workshop: River Bend Career Technical Center

    5:00pm – 8:00pm River Bend Career Technical Center

    Join us for a free Financial Aid Forms workshop. At this informal workshop, we will assist you as you file your FAFSA and Vermont state grant applications.

    College loans for students

    FAFSA Help: VSAC helpline walk-in assistance 11/16/17

    4:00pm – 8:00pm VSAC Resource Center in Winooski

    Will you be filing a FAFSA? The Free Application for Federal Student Aid is your pathway to funding for the education and career training after high school. Every student should file!

    College loans for students

    Learn About VHEIP: Oak Grove School Open House

    5:30pm – 7:00pm Oak Grove School

    VHEIP will be at the fall Open House for parents and students at Oak Grove School in Brattleboro on Thursday, November 16 from 5:30 to 7:00pm to give away free piggy banks or backpacks and speak with parents about how they can save and pay for college.

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    USE 401K for COLLEGE, college loan.#College #loan


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    Use 401K for College? The PLUS Loan or Cosigning a Private Student Loan May Be a Better Option!

    Q: My parents have agreed to help me pay for college. However, we do not have a 529 college savings plan, so my parents are looking for ways to get the money they need.

    They do not have enough mortgage equity for a home equity loan, so they are considering taking some money out of their 401K account.

    Is it a good idea to pay for college with 401K funds?

    A: Normally, it is a very BAD idea to take funds out of a 401K retirement account to pay education costs. Tapping into a 401K for education should be a last resort only.

    The thing your parents need to keep in mind is that they will probably need all of the retirement funds they have. And while you can borrow money for education expenses, it is impossible to take a loan for retirement expenses.

    401K funds are not designed for the purpose of education financing and there may be heavy penalties for early withdrawal of any money from that account.

    Depending on the 401K plan, it may be possible for your parents to apply for a loan from their 401K account provider, but even this can be an expensive option.

    So what is a better option?

    Consider the Federal PLUS Loan for Parents

    The Federal PLUS Loan for Parents allows parents to borrow up to 100 percent of education costs for a dependent child. These costs can include tuition, fees, housing, books, lab materials, and even transportation.

    And unlike a home equity loan or 401K loan, the interest rate is fixed for the life of the loan and no collateral is put at risk.

    Better yet, parents can qualify regardless of their income, assets, or credit score. Even millionaires can qualify for this loan!

    – Covers 100 percent of education costs not met by other sources of aid

    – Comes with a fixed interest rate

    – Parents with low credit scores can qualify

    – Parents with high incomes can also qualify

    – Repayment can be delayed until after graduation

    – Offers a choice of repayment options

    – Student loan interest payments may be tax-deductible

    Below is some more information that every student should know about the PLUS Loan:

    How can my parents get a PLUS Loan?

    Parents can borrow a PLUS Loan to help pay your education expenses if you are a dependent undergraduate student enrolled at least half time in an eligible program at an eligible school. PLUS Loans are available through the Direct Loan Program. Your parents must have an acceptable credit history. This means that your parents cannot have any bankruptcies, discharges, or loan write-offs.

    Also, your parents generally will be required to pass a credit check. If your parents do not pass the credit check, they might still be able to receive a loan if someone, such as a relative or friend who is able to pass the credit check, agrees to endorse the loan. An endorser promises to repay the loan if your parents fail to do so. Your parents might also qualify for a loan without passing the credit check if they can demonstrate that extenuating circumstances exist. You and your parents must also meet other general eligibility requirements for federal student financial aid.

    How much can parents borrow?

    The yearly limit on a PLUS Loan is equal to your cost of attendance minus any other financial aid you receive. If your cost of attendance is $6,000, for example, and you receive $4,000 in other financial aid, your parents can borrow up to $2,000.

    The U.S. Department of Education will send the loan funds to your school. Your school might require your parents to endorse a disbursement check and send it back to the school. In most cases, the loan will be disbursed in at least two installments, and no installment will be greater than half the loan amount. The funds will first be applied to your tuition, fees, room and board, and other school charges. If any loan funds remain, your parents will receive the amount as a check or in cash, unless they authorize the amount to be released to you or to be put into your school account. Any remaining loan funds must be used for your education expenses.

    Other than interest, is there a charge to get a PLUS Loan?

    When do parents begin repaying the loan?

    Normally, repayment will begin six months after the dependent student on whose behalf the parent borrowed ceases to be enrolled on at least a half-time basis.

    How do parents pay back these loans?

    Parent will repay their Direct PLUS Loan to the U.S. Department of Education Direct Loan Servicing Center.

    Is it ever possible to postpone repayment of a PLUS Loan?

    Generally, the conditions for eligibility and procedures for requesting a deferment or forbearance apply to both Stafford Loans and PLUS Loans. However, since all PLUS Loans are unsubsidized, your parents will be charged interest during periods of deferment or forbearance. If they do not pay the interest as it accrues, it will be capitalized (that is, added to the principal amount of the loan, and additional interest will be based on that higher amount).

    Can a PLUS Loan be discharged (canceled)?

    Your PLUS Loan cannot be canceled for these reasons: You did not complete your program of study at your school (unless you could not complete the program for a valid reason — because the school closed, for example), you did not like the school or the program of study, or you did not obtain employment after completing the program of study.

    For more information about loan discharge or repayment: If your parents have a Direct PLUS Loan, they should contact the Direct Loan Servicing Center at 1-800-848-0979, or go to studentaid.ed.gov . If they have a FFEL PLUS Loan, they should contact the lender or agency holding the loan.

    Looking for another option? Consider acting as a cosigner on a private student loan. You may be able to use your good income and credit history to help a student qualify for a private student loan with a good interest rate.



    Loans for college students, loans for college students.#Loans #for #college #students


    Loans

    Direct federal loans are a form of financial aid available to assist undergraduate students attending college at least half-time. Students may use the funds to pay for tuition, books, and living expenses. Loans must be repaid at a low fixed-rate.

    Interest Rates

    To be eligible for Federal Loans you must :

    • be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen;
    • be registered with Selective Service, if you’re a male (you must register between the ages of 18 and 25);
    • be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a regular student in an eligible degree or certificate program;
    • be enrolled at least half-time to be eligible for Direct Loan Program funds;
    • maintain satisfactory academic progress in college or career school;
    • sign statements on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) stating that you are not in default on a federal student loan and do not owe money on a federal student grant and you will use federal student aid only for educational purposes; and show you’re qualified to obtain a college or career school education by having a high school diploma or a recognized equivalent such as a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or completing a high school education in a homeschool setting approved under state law

    A loan based on financial need for which the federal government pays the interest that accrues while the borrower is in an in-school, grace, or deferment status. For Direct Subsidized Loans first disbursed between July 1, 2012 and July 1, 2014, the borrower will be responsible for paying any interest that accrues during the grace period. If the interest is not paid during the grace period, the interest will be added to the loan’s principle balance.

    A loan for which the borrower is fully responsible for paying the interest regardless of the loan status. Interest on unsubsidized loans accrues from the date of disbursement and continues through the life of the loan.

    A loan available parents of dependent undergraduate students for which the borrower is fully responsible for paying the interest regardless of the loan status.



    Student Loans for Community College, SimpleTuition, loans for college students.#Loans #for #college #students


    Student Loans for Community College

    Loans for college studentsWhen it comes to cost-effective methods of getting college credit and working towards a degree, community colleges offer a pretty compelling opportunity to students who are looking to learn and save at the same time. The American Association of Community Colleges suggests that community colleges provide a vital path to education particularly for nontraditional students: per an Association report, the average age of a community college student is 29. Many of these students need to restart their education before committing fully to a full college or university experience.

    Students who choose to go to a community college for a year or two will notice that costs are much lower than at standard educational institutions. Lower costs are always preferred, and this can especially help if a student has cash flow concerns. In New Jersey, for example, the cost of undergraduate tuition topped a reported $40,000 in 2013, while a full-time student in a community college in the state might be asked to pay a reported $4,000.

    • Children to feed
    • Car payments to make
    • Mortgages to pay

    It s difficult to be successful in a challenging job market without a college education, but then again, it s difficult to pay for a college education when the job market and economy on a whole is poor. Community college students can combat this catch-22 by choosing both a lower-cost option by going to community colleges, and also by considering student loans for community college.

    Federal Loans

    Loans for college studentsStudents who demonstrate financial need will usually benefit from receiving subsidized loans provided by the federal government. These loans are offered at a very low interest rate, and the government picks up the tab for the interest that accrues while the student is in school. While the student is required to pay the loan back, the combination of free interest and low interest can significantly reduce the financial burden a student can face while getting a degree.

    Federal student loans are generally very favorable to borrowers, especially when compared to their private counterparts. The interest rates are generally lower and are fixed, and subsidized federal loans provide student borrowers with some breathing room, as there are no interest charges while a student is enrolled in school at least on a half-time basis. There is also a grace period, usually of six months, during which students do not need to make payments on the loan, and when interest does not accrue.

    Not all federal student loans are subsidized. In fact, there are some federal student loans that still come with low interest rates that aren t tied to a student s financial need. These loans might accrue interest during the student s time in class, but some of these loans offer deferment packages that allow students to put off repayment until the loan is complete.

    Not All Colleges Participate

    While federal loans could be right for some students, not all community colleges participate in the federal student loan program. In fact, a report produced by the Project on Student Debt suggests that about 9 percent of students are enrolled in community colleges that don t accept federal student loans. Students hoping to get federal help with their student loans for community college should make sure that their school of choice participates in the federal student loan program.

    In some instances, students may wish to apply for private student loans, either in lieu of or in addition to federal loans. Borrowers should always exhaust their federal student loan options before turning to federal loans, but sometimes, students need to use a private loan to cover the full cost of their education. There are far more private loans than there are federal loans, and so it’s important to make sure you understand your options before borrowing.

    Some community colleges partner with private lenders, and these colleges provide students with a list of loans they can apply for. Visiting the student aid office at the school could be all a student needs to do in order to find out more about what money is available. But the best option is to shop around and compare multiple loan options, in order to make sure you find the loan that best suits your financial need.

    Private Options

    • Interest rate
    • Associated fees
    • Payment start dates
    • Length of repayment term

    Loan providers are required to disclose each and every detail about the loan, including how much the entire loan will cost if the student makes each payment on time, and what will happen if the student misses payments. Asking questions, taking notes and getting help from the financial aid office are excellent ways to ensure that the loan research and application process goes smoothly.

    Other Options

    Federal and private loans aren t the only ways students can pay for their education at a community college. Some states have specific programs that can benefit residents, while some schools offer loans to people of a specific ethnicity or culture. Some credit unions even offer discounted student loans for community college, with very few fees. Investigating those options might also be an excellent investment of time.

    Students who are unemployed might also qualify for educational programs through the federal government. TIME reports that the federal government has given community colleges $2 billion in order to retrain workers for the new economy. Some schools are using these funds to develop new programs, while others are using the funds to educate people at no charge at all. Unemployment offices and community college financial aid offices should have more information on these programs.

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    Maine DOE – Scholarships – Loans: Affording College, college loans.#College #loans


    Scholarships Loans: Affording College

    Paying for postsecondary education is one of the most significant investments you’ll make in life. It’s an investment with clear benefits in the form of improved skills and career prospects and considerably higher earnings potential, but an expensive one nonetheless

    This page offers connections to resources that could help you afford that all-important investment.

    • Finance Authority of Maine. The Finance Authority of Maine (FAME) offers Maine residents help in saving for postsecondary education and accessing financial aid. The FAME website has a number of helpful resources for students, parents and school counselors.
    • Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is the first step in applying for virtually all types of student financial aid.
    • Tuition Break for New England Residents. Maine students are eligible for reduced tuition if they attend out-of-state public colleges and universities within New England to study an approved major not offered at a public college in Maine.
    • Competitive Skills Scholarship Program. The Competitive Skills Scholarship is available to Maine residents 18 and older who are already part of the workforce and want to learn new skills to succeed in a changing economy. The scholarship pays for the certificate or degree program of the recipient’s choosing.
    • Opportunity Maine Tax Credit. Students who earn an associate’s or bachelor’s degree from a Maine college and stay in Maine to work after graduation are eligible for a significant tax credit to help them repay their student loans.
    • Veterans Dependents Educational Benefits. Maine provides a 100% waiver of tuition and all related fees for spouses and dependents of veterans as defined in Title 37B, Chapter 7, Section 505(2).

    Site Information

    College loans



    Applying for College Student Loans ~, federal college loans.#Federal #college #loans


    Student Loans Explained

    Most students rely on a variety of funding sources to pay for college. Personal savings and family contributions are one of the first places students turn, but often these resources don’t cover higher- education costs.

    Scholarships and grants are windfalls for college funding, because they do not require repayment. Performance and financial need are considered, and then eligible students are endowed with gifts that pay for tuition, books and housing. Do not leave free money on the table – apply for every grant and scholarship for which you qualify.

    Loans are the most common funding sources for college: According to the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), 65% of four-year undergraduate students take out student loans to help them pay for college. But unlike some other resources, loans must be paid back. Loans, and associated interestcosts, typically keep graduates in debt for 10 years or more.

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    Types of Student Loans

    Student loans are funded by a variety of sources including The United States Federal Government and private lenders like banks and credit unions. Federal loans are the most accessible to students, and offer the best repayment terms.

    Private loans, also referred to as personal loans and alternative loans can be difficult for students to secure without cosigners. Interest rates are higher than federal student loans, but still fall below most other types of private financing (home, car, etc.)

    Federal Student Loans

    The Federal Family Education Loan program (FFEL) is a now-defunct lending program designed to provide American college students and their families with federally backed student loans. These loans are now made through the U.S. Department of Education’s Direct Loan Program.

    These distinct types of loans are available to students and parents seeking Federal Financial Aid:

    • Subsidized Stafford Loans are available to students who demonstrate financial need. Payments are not required while you are enrolled in school, or during grace periods and deferment periods. Interest rates vary, but are currently 3.4%. Loan limits move on a sliding scale, based on what year you are in college; ranging from $5,500 annually, for first year students to $7,500, for third year students and beyond.
    • Unsubsidized Stafford Loans do not require students to show a particular level of financial need. Interest accrues on these loans from the moment the funds are issued, and students are given the choice to pay as they go, or add accumulated interest to the total amount owed following school. Loan limits match those of Subsidized Stafford Loans, but interest rates are higher; currently fixed at 6.8%.

    To be considered for Stafford Loans and other Federal Student Aid, you must submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Repayment begins six-months after graduation, and is governed by repayment schedules ranging in length from 10 to 25 years.

    Perkins loans are federally funded loans administered directly by your institution of higher education Federal college loans(IHE). The loans are extended to students who have the greatest financial need. In general, families with annual incomes below $25,000 are eligible for Perkins Loans.

    These three factors determine the size of your Perkins Loan:

    1. When you apply
    2. Your level of financial need
    3. Funding level at your school

    The maximum annual loan for undergraduate students is $5500, with a lifetime loan maximum of $27,000. Graduate students can borrow up to $8000 each year, with a $60,000 lifetime cap.

    Perkins Loan repayment starts 9 months following graduation, witha fixed 5% interest rate.

    Parents of dependent undergraduatestudents can borrow money under this federal program. Borrowers must be able to pass a credit check, and the student whose education is being funded must be a dependent that meets these minimum requirements:

    Parents access PLUS loans by filing an application, and signing a Master Promissory Note (MPN). Interest rates are fixed at 7.9%, and borrowing limits are determined by subtracting all other financial aid award amounts from the total cost of attending school.

    For students holding multiple federal loans, this program facilitates combining them into a single loan. A single monthly payment replaces the need to pay each loan individually, and the repayment terms of the loan can be extended for up to 30 years.

    Students considering this loan should pay close attention to how their total repayment costs might be affected. Consolidating and extending the repayment schedule of your loans can add considerable costs to your total obligation.

    State Student Loans

    State-specific funding varies – some have none, while others have a great deal. Your FAFSA places you in contention for some state loans, but other programs require separate enrollment. Your high-school guidance counselor and college financial aid office are equipped to sort out the specifics for your state.

    You can also find valuable information on state higher education websites. In Minnesota, for example, students are eligible for loans, under a program called SELF.

    SELF is not subsidized, so worthy credit is required for getting a loan. Minnesota residents who attend participating colleges are eligible to borrow up to $10,000 each year, at a fixed rate of 7.25%. Cosigners provide credit reinforcement that enables students with limited credit to apply.

    Private Student Loans

    Private student loans, such as those offered by Wells Fargo and Chase are designed to bridge the gap between your financial aid package and the true cost of your education. Private loans require borrowersto pass credit checks, and the loans often have higher interest rates than those subsidized by the U.S. Government.

    Cosigners who are willing to share responsibility for your loan provide the credit resources you need to get private financing. Federal Student Loans should be considered first, but used appropriately; private loans can effectively pay for extra educational costs, without creating unmanageable financial burdens.

    Institutional Student Loans

    Institutional loans are extended by colleges and universities as a means to cover educational costs that remain after other forms of financial aid have been applied. Long-term and short-term institutional loans are used to pay for books, room and board, and other student expenses.

    Institutional loans are by definition campus-specific, so interest rates and repayment terms are determined by each educator. Your financial aid office is best equipped to outline specific programs offered by your school.

    Federal college loans

    Managing Your Student Loans

    Apply these responsible financial management principles, as you repay your student loans:

    • Consider the advantages of loan forgiveness programs. These programs are available to students who agree to work in high-need fields like nursing and education. Enrolling in the military often makes you eligible for loan forgiveness. Essentially, you commit to work or serve for a designated period of time, in exchange for complete or partial loan forgiveness.
    • Make student loan payments on time. In some cases, your interest rate may qualify for reduction after you make a certain number of consecutive on-time payments. If you have a cosigner, he or she may be released from responsibility for the loan, once you have exhibited a required level of consistency with your repayments. Defaulting on your student loans has far-reaching consequences, so it is never an option.
    • Manage your loan repayment schedule using online calculators. If you are considering a consolidation loan, use these tools to quickly determine your total loan repayment obligation.
    • Take advantage of federal education tax incentives, like the student loan interest deduction and Hope Scholarship Credit.


    US Government Federal Student Loan Programs ~, federal college loans.#Federal #college #loans


    Applying and Qualifying for the Federal Perkins Loans

    For the college bound student looking for financial aid, qualifying for a grant is ideal. But, not all grants will cover the entirety of your tuition costs. When you factor in book costs, dorm fees and the cost of living in general most grants fall short of the mark when it comes to paying all of your college expenses. That’s why student loans play such a major role in financing a college education.

    Federal students loans, with their fixed low interest rates and flexible repayment plans, offer the most attractive solution. The Federal Perkins Loan Program should be a key component in any student’s college financial plan. The Perkins loan offers many benefits and features that make it an excellent source of financial aid for eligible students.

    Features of a Perkins Loan:

    • Low-interest, fixed rate loans
    • Need-based
    • Available through participating colleges and universities
    • Optional loan cancellation for eligible borrowers
    • Available to eligible undergraduate and graduate students
    • 9-Month grace period
    • No application fees
    • No credit checks

    Federal college loans

    What is a Federal Perkins Loan?

    The Federal Perkins Loan is a campus-based financial aid package that is available to both undergraduate and graduate students. Participating colleges and universities receive annual loan allowances from the U.S. Department of Education, and it is from theses funds that the school makes Perkins Loans available to eligible students. These loans are limited number and eligible students are advised to apply early. Perkins loans are free of any application or other hidden fees and offer a 9 month grace period following graduation before repayment must begin.

    Perkins Loan recipients borrow directly from the college campus of their choice. These are subsidized loans, meaning the government pays the interest that accrues on the loan for as long as a students remains in school as well as the 9 month grace period. Under graduate students are limited to loans of $4,000 per year, with a lifetime limit of $20,000. Graduate students are allowed an increased limit of $6,000 per annum, with a $40,000 lifetime limit.

    While many students qualify for the Federal Perkins Loan, not all colleges and universities participate in the program. Check with your college of choice to learn if they are one of the approximately 1700 colleges and universities that do participate in the program. With it’s fixed low interest rates, Federal subsidization and flexible repayment terms the Perkins Loan is the most borrower friendly student loan available.

    Qualifications for a Perkins Loan

    The chief determining factor of a student’s eligibility for the Perkins Loan program is financial need. A student must fall within a certain income bracket and the student’s Expected Family Contribution or EFC must be rated low on the Federal scale. Other application requirements include:

    • Student must be enrolled in an accredited school at least half-time.
    • Student must be enrolled in a college or institution that participates in the program.
    • Student must be a U.S. citizen, a legal permanent resident or an eligible non-citizen.
    • Student must no history of defaulting on prior student loans.
    • Student must be registered with the Selective Service where applicable.
    • Student must meet minimum GPA.

    Federal college loans

    Applying for a Perkins Loan

    All Federal financial aid programs require students to fill out and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid or FAFSA. Once you have submitted your FAFSA and it has been reviewed, you will receive your Student Aid Report which details the amount of your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). This is the amount of money you or your family are responsible for contributing to your education.

    Within a few weeks, you should receive follow up letters from the colleges to which you have applied detailing any and all types of financial aid for which you have qualified, including the Perkins Loan. This letter must be returned to the college or university indicating what financial aid you are accepting. If you are approved for a Perkins Loan you must coordinate with your school immediately to secure the loan and receive your financial aid money. Loan funds are limited and the earlier you respond the better your chances of getting the loan you need.

    Repayment of the Perkins Loan

    During the final weeks of your college term your school will contact you and provide loan repayment details relative to your Perkins Loan. You will have the benefit of a 9 month grace period in which to become settled and find a job before any repayment schedule begins. This grace period is one of the major bonuses of the Federal Perkins Loan program, allowing students some time to enter the workforce before any loan payments must be made.

    Loan Cancellation for Teachers

    A significant benefit of the Federal Perkins Loan program is the Cancellation or Deferment Option for Teachers. Students who agree to take up full time teaching positions in low-income public school districts, or take positions teaching in certain subject areas may be eligible for cancellation or deferment of all or part of your Perkins loan. Check with your college for more information regarding any deferment or loan forgiveness programs for which you may be eligible.



    College loans for parents, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    Loans

    Direct federal loans are a form of financial aid available to assist undergraduate students attending college at least half-time. Students may use the funds to pay for tuition, books, and living expenses. Loans must be repaid at a low fixed-rate.

    Interest Rates

    To be eligible for Federal Loans you must :

    • be a U.S. citizen or an eligible noncitizen;
    • be registered with Selective Service, if you’re a male (you must register between the ages of 18 and 25);
    • be enrolled or accepted for enrollment as a regular student in an eligible degree or certificate program;
    • be enrolled at least half-time to be eligible for Direct Loan Program funds;
    • maintain satisfactory academic progress in college or career school;
    • sign statements on the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) stating that you are not in default on a federal student loan and do not owe money on a federal student grant and you will use federal student aid only for educational purposes; and show you’re qualified to obtain a college or career school education by having a high school diploma or a recognized equivalent such as a General Educational Development (GED) certificate or completing a high school education in a homeschool setting approved under state law

    A loan based on financial need for which the federal government pays the interest that accrues while the borrower is in an in-school, grace, or deferment status. For Direct Subsidized Loans first disbursed between July 1, 2012 and July 1, 2014, the borrower will be responsible for paying any interest that accrues during the grace period. If the interest is not paid during the grace period, the interest will be added to the loan’s principle balance.

    A loan for which the borrower is fully responsible for paying the interest regardless of the loan status. Interest on unsubsidized loans accrues from the date of disbursement and continues through the life of the loan.

    A loan available parents of dependent undergraduate students for which the borrower is fully responsible for paying the interest regardless of the loan status.



    Information About Going to College, Before College, During College, After College Information, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    Students Parents

    Created especially for students of every age who are looking for information about going to college, this area of our website has all your answers. Although it was written with students in mind, parents of college-bound students will find this information helpful, too. Plus, there s a link below for parent-specific topics.

    ISAC Student Portal

    College loans for parents

    Create an ISAC Student Portal profile and access information about your ISAC programs. If you are a member of the Illinois National Guard, the Portal is where you complete, submit and check on the status of your application, keep track of the eligibility units you have received and print a copy of your most recent Notice of Eligibility.

    Before College

    If you re considering college or already making plans to go, Before College is where you ll find the information to get started. You can research colleges and careers, learn about the college admission process and get help in choosing the school that s right for you. This is also where we explain how and when to take the first step in the financial aid process by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA ). Meet our ISACorps members, deployed across the state and offering free presentations and one-on-one assistance for students and families navigating the college-going and financial aid process.

    During College

    During College is where you’ll learn about ways to pay for college, including through the programs administered by ISAC. ISAC program applications are located in this area, as well as detailed information about the available grant, scholarship and loan programs.

    After College

    Use After College to help make the transition from college to career. Get tips on finding a job and establishing a budget, and learn how to start the process of paying back your students loans and fulfilling the commitments attached to scholarships and/or grants you may have received.

    Parents

    The Parents area supplements the three sections listed above by providing parent-specific information that will assist you as you help your child navigate the college process.

    Espa ol

    En esta secci n encontrar s la informaci n en espa ol que necesitas para ingresar a la universidad, recursos de ayuda financiera, entender los pasos en c mo solicitar para la ayuda financiera para pagar la universidad.

    Student Parent Quick Links

    College loans for parents



    Applying for College Student Loans ~, college loans for parents.#College #loans #for #parents


    Student Loans Explained

    Most students rely on a variety of funding sources to pay for college. Personal savings and family contributions are one of the first places students turn, but often these resources don’t cover higher- education costs.

    Scholarships and grants are windfalls for college funding, because they do not require repayment. Performance and financial need are considered, and then eligible students are endowed with gifts that pay for tuition, books and housing. Do not leave free money on the table – apply for every grant and scholarship for which you qualify.

    Loans are the most common funding sources for college: According to the National Postsecondary Student Aid Study (NPSAS), 65% of four-year undergraduate students take out student loans to help them pay for college. But unlike some other resources, loans must be paid back. Loans, and associated interestcosts, typically keep graduates in debt for 10 years or more.

    College loans for parents

    Types of Student Loans

    Student loans are funded by a variety of sources including The United States Federal Government and private lenders like banks and credit unions. Federal loans are the most accessible to students, and offer the best repayment terms.

    Private loans, also referred to as personal loans and alternative loans can be difficult for students to secure without cosigners. Interest rates are higher than federal student loans, but still fall below most other types of private financing (home, car, etc.)

    Federal Student Loans

    The Federal Family Education Loan program (FFEL) is a now-defunct lending program designed to provide American college students and their families with federally backed student loans. These loans are now made through the U.S. Department of Education’s Direct Loan Program.

    These distinct types of loans are available to students and parents seeking Federal Financial Aid:

    • Subsidized Stafford Loans are available to students who demonstrate financial need. Payments are not required while you are enrolled in school, or during grace periods and deferment periods. Interest rates vary, but are currently 3.4%. Loan limits move on a sliding scale, based on what year you are in college; ranging from $5,500 annually, for first year students to $7,500, for third year students and beyond.
    • Unsubsidized Stafford Loans do not require students to show a particular level of financial need. Interest accrues on these loans from the moment the funds are issued, and students are given the choice to pay as they go, or add accumulated interest to the total amount owed following school. Loan limits match those of Subsidized Stafford Loans, but interest rates are higher; currently fixed at 6.8%.

    To be considered for Stafford Loans and other Federal Student Aid, you must submit a Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). Repayment begins six-months after graduation, and is governed by repayment schedules ranging in length from 10 to 25 years.

    Perkins loans are federally funded loans administered directly by your institution of higher education College loans for parents(IHE). The loans are extended to students who have the greatest financial need. In general, families with annual incomes below $25,000 are eligible for Perkins Loans.

    These three factors determine the size of your Perkins Loan:

    1. When you apply
    2. Your level of financial need
    3. Funding level at your school

    The maximum annual loan for undergraduate students is $5500, with a lifetime loan maximum of $27,000. Graduate students can borrow up to $8000 each year, with a $60,000 lifetime cap.

    Perkins Loan repayment starts 9 months following graduation, witha fixed 5% interest rate.

    Parents of dependent undergraduatestudents can borrow money under this federal program. Borrowers must be able to pass a credit check, and the student whose education is being funded must be a dependent that meets these minimum requirements:

    Parents access PLUS loans by filing an application, and signing a Master Promissory Note (MPN). Interest rates are fixed at 7.9%, and borrowing limits are determined by subtracting all other financial aid award amounts from the total cost of attending school.

    For students holding multiple federal loans, this program facilitates combining them into a single loan. A single monthly payment replaces the need to pay each loan individually, and the repayment terms of the loan can be extended for up to 30 years.

    Students considering this loan should pay close attention to how their total repayment costs might be affected. Consolidating and extending the repayment schedule of your loans can add considerable costs to your total obligation.

    State Student Loans

    State-specific funding varies – some have none, while others have a great deal. Your FAFSA places you in contention for some state loans, but other programs require separate enrollment. Your high-school guidance counselor and college financial aid office are equipped to sort out the specifics for your state.

    You can also find valuable information on state higher education websites. In Minnesota, for example, students are eligible for loans, under a program called SELF.

    SELF is not subsidized, so worthy credit is required for getting a loan. Minnesota residents who attend participating colleges are eligible to borrow up to $10,000 each year, at a fixed rate of 7.25%. Cosigners provide credit reinforcement that enables students with limited credit to apply.

    Private Student Loans

    Private student loans, such as those offered by Wells Fargo and Chase are designed to bridge the gap between your financial aid package and the true cost of your education. Private loans require borrowersto pass credit checks, and the loans often have higher interest rates than those subsidized by the U.S. Government.

    Cosigners who are willing to share responsibility for your loan provide the credit resources you need to get private financing. Federal Student Loans should be considered first, but used appropriately; private loans can effectively pay for extra educational costs, without creating unmanageable financial burdens.

    Institutional Student Loans

    Institutional loans are extended by colleges and universities as a means to cover educational costs that remain after other forms of financial aid have been applied. Long-term and short-term institutional loans are used to pay for books, room and board, and other student expenses.

    Institutional loans are by definition campus-specific, so interest rates and repayment terms are determined by each educator. Your financial aid office is best equipped to outline specific programs offered by your school.

    College loans for parents

    Managing Your Student Loans

    Apply these responsible financial management principles, as you repay your student loans:

    • Consider the advantages of loan forgiveness programs. These programs are available to students who agree to work in high-need fields like nursing and education. Enrolling in the military often makes you eligible for loan forgiveness. Essentially, you commit to work or serve for a designated period of time, in exchange for complete or partial loan forgiveness.
    • Make student loan payments on time. In some cases, your interest rate may qualify for reduction after you make a certain number of consecutive on-time payments. If you have a cosigner, he or she may be released from responsibility for the loan, once you have exhibited a required level of consistency with your repayments. Defaulting on your student loans has far-reaching consequences, so it is never an option.
    • Manage your loan repayment schedule using online calculators. If you are considering a consolidation loan, use these tools to quickly determine your total loan repayment obligation.
    • Take advantage of federal education tax incentives, like the student loan interest deduction and Hope Scholarship Credit.


    Fund Your College Expenses Using Federal and Private Loan Sources, student loans for college.#Student #loans #for #college


    Using Loans to Pay for Your Student Tuition and Other Fees

    College costs go beyond tuition. Books, housing, meals and other expenses contribute to the extraordinary cost of higher education. The transition from living at home to full-time campus life represents a significant financial shift for college students and their parents.

    Pre-planning sets the stage for university education, but not every student has a college fund to draw from. For most college students, financial aid is an essential part of getting an education. As college looms on the horizon, consider three primary sources of funding: Scholarships, grants and loans.

    Scholarships are usually earned through performance and achievement. For those who excel in high-school, academic and athletic success is rewarded with money for college. Scholarship money does not require repayment, so accomplished students should tap every resource available.

    Combination scholarships require students to stand out from their peers in more than one way. Exceptional athletes who also do well in school are rewarded on both fronts, as scholar-athletes. Student-citizens who actively participate in community affairs receive scholarships that acknowledge their efforts. Other traits like ethnic heritage, gender and financial need are used to determine eligibility for some special scholarships.

    Grants, like scholarships, provide financial aid for college that does not require repayment. Typically, qualifying for grant money is based on your level of financial need. Federal grants, from Pell and other programs, offset college costs for the neediest applicants.

    States, corporations, universities and other advocacy groups provide education grants. Like federal grants, some require only that candidates exhibit some level of financial hardship paying for college. Other grants provide aid for specific sets of individuals, like minorities and other under-represented student groups.

    Scholarships and grants are coveted aid resources for university students, because they generate college cash that does not require repayment. Any gift aid is ideal, but when free money doesn t cover college costs, students use loans to make up the difference.Student loans for college

    Student loans originate from government agencies and private sources. Loans require repayment, so low-interest federally subsidized options provide attractive financing for students. Your best approach to harnessing the education loans you need is to apply for federal financial aid.

    How to Apply for a Loan

    First things first: Apply for financial aid by completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA).

    The Department of Education has the deepest pockets for providing financial aid, so your first step is to ask for it. Your FAFSA provides the government with information about your family, including income and size. The number of your siblings who are also attending college, as well as your parents income level are used to estimate the amount of money your family can realistically provide for college.

    Your Estimated Family Contribution (EFC) is the cornerstone of your individual Student Aid Report; the document used by universities to determine your financial aid eligibility.

    When your college makes a formal student aid offer, it is usually a financing package that blends various forms of assistance, including grants and loans. in the past, the most common government loans were called Stafford Loans, but they are now referred to as Federal Direct Student Loans. Stafford loans were guaranteed by the government, but issued by private lenders. Today s Direct Loans are administered without private banks and credit unions.

    William D. Ford Federal Direct Loan Program administers direct student loans in these categories:

    • Subsidized Direct Loans Students demonstrating financial need are eligible for low-interest loans, which are subsidized by the Department of Education. Interest rates currently stand at 3.4%. Students are not responsible for interest payments during school, during a 6-month grace period following graduation, and during periods of loan deferment.
    • Unsubsidized Direct Loans Financial need is not an eligibility requirement for this type of loan. The interest rate is higher, at 6.8%, but still well below commercial lending rates. Students are responsible for interest payment during the lifetime of this loan, including during enrollment and grace periods.
    • PLUS Loans Parents of dependent students are eligible for loans to help pay for school. PLUS rates are 7.9%, providing a low-interest borrowing alternative for parents. Interest is always the responsibility of each PLUS loan recipient.
    • Direct Consolidation Loans Students can bundle existing loan debt into a single direct loan. Repayment terms are adjusted to accommodate students ability to pay, and a single payment is applied to total outstanding debt each term.

    Perkins Loans provide additional low-interest assistance for the neediest federal applicants. Families with annual incomes below $25,000 qualify as Perkins candidates. Participating Institutions of Higher Education (IHE) distribute funds based on three criteria that influence the size of your Perkins offer:

    Perkins recipients enjoy low interest rates, around 5%, and may borrow up to $5,500 annually for undergraduate studies.

    Important Change to Subsidized Direct Loan Repayment Terms – Direct subsidized loans issued after July 1, 2012 are not eligible for a federal interest subsidy during the 6-month grace period following graduation. Loan recipients must pay interest during this period. Unpaid amounts will be added to loan principle.

    States issue education loans too, so consult with your school s financial aid office for information about state-specific programs and current lending rates.

    Private Student Loans and Debt

    You ll find student loan opportunities in the private sector too, but securing them requires more than a timely-filed FAFSA. For-profit lenders will not loan money based simply on your pledge to repay it-regardless of your financial need.

    Formal credit checks thwart many college students efforts to raise money for school. Limited credit interactions, and lack of collateral are not attractive features among potential borrowers. Banks want to see a long history of credit success before they hand over cash for college. If you are unsure where you stand credit-wise, request a copy of your report.

    Even if you ve made timely car payments, and manage your mobile phone account without problems, your credit track record is not long enough to make you a safe bet for conventional lenders. Private college loans are not outside your grasp, but you will need a loan cosigner to get the job done.

    Partnering with a friend or relative bolsters your credit-worthiness, because lenders factor in your cosigners history of successful and diverse credit relationships. Private loans carry higher interest rates than Federal Direct Loans, but paying them back on-time helps establish your own credit-rating following graduation.

    If your repayment schedule does not reflect your ability to pay, consider bundling your outstanding college debt into a single consolidation loan. Federal consolidation and private consolidation options protect you and your cosigners from adverse credit entries. Consolidate proactively, because once you ve defaulted on your student loans, getting back on-track is more difficult.

    Manage your student loan accounts responsibly, and use on-time payments to establish your credit.

    Tax Breaks and Emergency College Aid

    Student loan interest payments are deductible on your tax return, so use your education expenses to offset your income tax. Deduct student loan interest as you would mortgage interest payments, and always discuss your personal tax strategies with a financial adviser. Of course, your student loan interest rate ultimately impacts the tax advantages associated with your loan payoff.

    The best-laid college plans sometime come up short of funds. Emergency financial aid programs are not widely advertised, but help is available during college cash crisis.

    To access the money you need for college, work the financial aid system from the top down. File your FAFSA on-time and tap government resources for college loans. Stepping outside the Department of Education for college loans requires credit-checks and cosigners, but banks and credit unions provide valuable funding when you need it most.



    Federal student loan interest rates to rise July 1, college loan interest rates.#College #loan #interest #rates


    Federal student loan interest rates to rise Saturday

    College loan interest rates

    College students and their families can expect to pay more as they borrow for the fall semester.

    Starting Saturday, interest rates will rise on new federal loans for 2017-2018.

    Rates were set based on the Treasury Department’s May 10 auction of 10-year notes. For new loans disbursed from July 1, 2017, to June 30, 2018, undergraduates will pay 4.45 percent. That’s an increase from this year’s rate of 3.76 percent.

    Graduate students can also expect to pay higher financing costs after Saturday.

    They will pay 6 percent for a direct unsubsidized loan — which begins accruing interest as soon as the borrower takes out the loan — an increase from 5.31 percent this year.

    Finally, rates on direct PLUS loans, which both graduate students and parents of undergrads can use, will rise to 7 percent from the current 6.31 percent.

    The increases don’t apply to private student loans.

    College loan interest rates

    Last year, the average college graduate owed $37,172, up 6 percent from 2015, according to data from Student Loan Hero.

    Students currently in college already estimate that they’ll owe a median of $30,000 to $39,999 by the time they graduate, according to a recent survey of 1,040 undergraduates by College Ave Student Loans.

    Total student debt in the United States is now over $1.4 trillion — the majority of which is from federal loans.

    Rates are up for everyone

    An undergraduate who borrowed $25,000 at this year’s rate of 3.76 percent would pay $5,032 in interest over 10 years, according to NerdWallet’s student loan calculator.

    With the rate increase, a student who borrows the same amount next academic year at 4.45 percent can expect to pay almost $1,000 more in interest.

    “The financial impact of this increase is on the order of a few dollars a month on a 10-year repayment plan for every $10,000 borrowed,” said Mark Kantrowitz, vice president of strategy for college and scholarship search site Cappex.com.

    “This increase doesn’t affect existing loans, just the ones that are disbursed starting July 1,” he said.

    More from College Game Plan

    College loan interest rates



    FinAid, Calculators, Education Loan Interest Rates, college loan interest rates.#College #loan #interest #rates


    college loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest ratesCollege loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    College loan interest rates

    Education Loan Interest Rates

    The interest rates on Federal education loans change on July 1, and are based on the 91-day rate from the last Treasury auction in May and the average one-year constant maturity Treasury yield (CMT) for the last calendar week ending on or before June 26th. The following rates are updated automatically by a program that retrieves the latest appropriate Treasury bill auction data from the US Treasury web site. (During the month of June, the rates may reflect the updated reference rates. Check the date of the 91-day T-Bill and CMT reference rates listed below to see whether the student loan rates refer to the old or new academic year.)

    Please note that the College Cost Reduction and Access Act of 2007 cut the fixed interest rates on newly originated subsidized Stafford loans for undergraduate students to 6.0% (2008-09), 5.6% (2009-10), 4.5% (2010-11) and 3.4% (2011-12), with a return to 6.8% in 2012-13. These cuts are available only to undergraduate students, not graduate students, and only for subsidized Stafford loans, not unsubsidized Stafford loans. Those loans remain at a fixed rate of 6.8%.

    The Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 switched to 100% Direct Lending for all new loans starting July 1, 2010. The Direct Loan program has a lower interest rate on the PLUS loan than in the FFEL program (7.9% vs. 8.5%).

    In the following table, the In-School Rate includes grace and deferment periods, and the Repayment Rate includes forbearance periods.

    For use with Net Present Value calculations, the discount rate based on the most recent 10-year Treasury note is 2.75%.

    The interest rates listed above are based on the following reference rates:

    • 91-day T-Bill rate of 0.05% (05-28-2013)

  • 10-year Treasury Note rate of 2.75% (11-13-2013 10-YEAR)

    The interest rate formulas are as follows, where the 91-day T-bill rate is the investment yield of the 13-week Treasury Bill, not the discount rate:

    As of 11-12-2013, the current projections for the 2014-2015 variable interest rates are:

    • Projected Stafford Loan (In-School/Grace Period): 1.78%

  • Projected Stafford Loan (Repayment Period): 2.38%

  • Projected PLUS Loan: 3.18%


  • These projections would yield the following consolidation loan interest rates:

    • Projected Stafford Loan Consolidation (In-School/Grace Period): 1.88%

    • Projected Stafford Loan Consolidation (Repayment Period): 2.50%

    • Projected PLUS Loan Consolidation: 3.25%


    These projections represent a projected increase of 0.030% in interest rates.

    These projections indicate what the student loan interest rates would be if they were based on the most recent 91-day T-Bill auction, as opposed to the last 91-day T-Bill auction in May. They do not take into account the impact of future federal funds rate hikes and cuts by the Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC). Interest rate hikes and cuts by the FOMC usually trigger corresponding increases and cuts in education loan interest rates. Since education loan interest rates are based on market rates, and the market tends to anticipate interest rate moves by the FOMC, the dates of upcoming FOMC meetings should be considered when projecting likely education loan interest rate increases. Specifically, one should consider the dates of all FOMC meetings between the most recent 91-day T-Bill auction and the last 91-day T-Bill auction in May, plus any regularly scheduled June meetings of the FOMC. For example, if the FOMC has increased the fund rate by 25 basic points at each of its last three meetings and there is one more FOMC meeting before the last 91-day T-Bill auction in May, one can expect education loan interest rates to be about 25 basis points higher than the projections listed above.

    On February 8, 2002, President Bush signed legislation changing the interest rates on education loans from variable rates to fixed rates for new loans issued after July 1, 2006. The interest rate on the Stafford Loan is 6.8% and the interest rate on the PLUS Loan is 7.9%. The scheduled increase in the PLUS Loan interest rate was subsequently changed from 7.9% to 8.5% by the Higher Education Reconciliation Act of 2005, as passed on February 8, 2006. This bill, however, failed to make a parallel change to the Direct Loan program, so only the FFEL PLUS Loan interest rate will be increasing to 8.5%. Thus the fixed rates on new loans for which the first disbursement occurs on or after July 1, 2006 are: 6.8% Stafford, 7.9% Federal Direct PLUS and 8.5% FFEL PLUS.

    Other recent interest rates include:

    • 30-year Fixed Rate Mortgage: 4.87% [04/07/2011]
    • 91-day T-Bill: 0.09% [04/01/2011]
    • Certificate of Deposit (6 month): 0.36% [04/01/2011]
    • Commercial Paper Rate (3 month): 0.25% [04/01/2011]
    • Constant Maturity Treasury (1 year): 0.30% [04/01/2011]
    • Federal Funds Rate (Effective Rate): 0.13% [03/30/2011]
    • LIBOR (1 month): 0.29% [04/01/2011]
    • LIBOR (3 month): 0.42% [04/01/2011]
    • Prime Lending Rate: 3.25% [03/30/2011]

    Recent interest rate spreads include:

    • Spread Commercial Paper vs LIBOR (3 month): 0.17% [04/01/2011]
    • Spread Prime Lending Rate vs LIBOR (1 month): 2.96% [03/30/2011]
    • Spread Prime Lending Rate vs LIBOR (3 month): 2.83% [03/30/2011]

    Additional rate information can be found at the NCHELP E-Library.



    Home Equity Loan Advice, Line of Credit, HELOC, college loan interest rates.#College #loan #interest #rates


    Home Equity – All about line of credit

    College loan interest rates

    Monthly payment requirements can vary, depending on whether you have a fixed term loan or a line of credit that permits much smaller payments.

    Home Equity Advice

    The average cost of a $30,000 home equity line of credit has been around 4.8% all year. That’s as cheap as those loans have been in more than a decade. But you still need to be very careful when tapping the value of your home.

    November 7th 2017

    These are the predictable pitfalls that can turn the renovations of your dreams into a nightmare you’ll be reliving, and possibly regretting, for years to come. Avoid them, and you’ll dramatically increase the odds of bringing your project in on budget, on time and with absolutely delightful results.

    October 30th 2017

    Home equity lines of credit can be a cheap way to borrow money for home renovations, college bills or credit card debt. But is your home worth enough to support a second mortgage?

    October 24th 2017

    The simplest, most likely answer is that your heirs will be allowed to assume your loan and keep the home as long as they make the payments. But, as you’ll see, nothing is simple in estate law.

    October 17th 2017

    If you’re among the millions of Americans bracing for the minimum payment on your home equity line of credit to go up — way up — there’s no need to panic. There are lots of ways to deal with repaying this debt.

    if you’ve had a “For Sale” sign languishing in your yard for more than a couple of months, there’s a good chance you’re doing something wrong or have a problem that you’re unaware of and haven’t addressed. Here’s how to get your property moving.

    Whether you’re redoing your kitchen or tackling a smaller project, our expert tips will help you avoid the biggest remodeling mistakes.

    If your home isn’t getting the right amount of heat at the right price, it could be time to replace your furnace. Our 10 tips will guide you.

    Some home repairs you can postpone forever. These are the kinds of leaks, shorts, cracks and critters that can lead to exceptionally expensive, even catastrophic, damage that you simply can’t ignore.

    Wells Fargo no longer allows home equity line of credit borrowers to make interest-only payments on their loans, meaning minimum monthly payments will rise. But this move could also save your house from foreclosure.



    Student Loan Interest Rates Will Increase Next Year, Money, college loan interest rates.#College #loan #interest #rates


    The Rate for Undergraduate Student Loans Is About to Climb to 4.45%

    College and grad students borrowing for the upcoming academic year will pay higher interest rates on federal loans than they did this year, a difference that could amount to hundreds of dollars in extra interest over the life of a loan, following a Treasury auction Wednesday.

    The interest rate for undergraduate students is 4.45% for the 2017-18 school year, up from 3.76% for the current year. Graduate students can borrow at a rate of 6%, up from 5.31%. And for graduate students and parents who take out PLUS loans, the interest rate will be 7%, up from 6.31%. This year s rates overall are the lowest since the government stopped issuing variable rate student loans.

    Federal student loan interest rates have been tied to 10-year Treasury note rates since 2013, when Congress decided rates should reset every year based on market conditions. The interest rate move, set at an auction Wednesday, was expected after the Federal Reserve raised benchmark short-term interest rates twice in the past six months in response to healthy U.S. economic growth.

    Expectations that the Trump administration will increase government spending, while simultaneously cutting taxes potentially widening the budget deficit and pushing future interest rates higher was also a factor, says Stephen Dash, chief executive and founder of Credible.com, a student loan marketplace.

    The new interest rates, which go into effect July 1, apply only to borrowers who take out loans during the upcoming 2017-18 school year. However, those rates are fixed for the life of the loan, meaning borrowers will continue to pay the new, higher rates for years to come. Because new rates are set each year, it is common for undergraduates to have at least four separate loans with four different interest rates upon graduation.

    While this year s increase won t drastically change a borrower s monthly payment, the extra interest will add up over time. A student who borrows $5,500 for a year of college would pay $220 more in interest with this year s rate compared to last year s, based on a 10-year repayment timeline.

    Still, given last year s rates, borrowers are still getting a pretty good deal. Rates have been as high as 4.66% since the process for setting rates was changed in 2013. A decade ago, before the change, rates were above 6%.

    This article has been updated to clarify that interest rates on student loans were lower than 3.76% from 2003-2005, when the government issued variable interest rates on student loans.



    Why You Should NOT Take Out Student Loans for College – ReadyForZero Blog, college student loans.#College #student #loans


    Why You Should NOT Take Out Student Loans for College

    College student loans

    Welcome to the 5th Smart Money Debate at ReadyForZero! To see the other side of this debate, read Dominique s post: Why You Should Take Out Student Loans for College. And then let us know which argument was more convincing!

    This post is written by Kelli Space, a student loan advocate and personal finance enthusiast who writes about her own student loan experience at twohundredthou.com. She is also the co-founder of Zero Bound, an online platform that aims to help students and alumni pay off their student loans through sponsored volunteering. She has a BA in Sociology from Northeastern University and believes more (affordable) education is in her near future.

    College student loansLast year, student loan debt surpassed credit card debt. 1 This year, student loan debt topped $1 trillion dollars. 2 While this says a lot about the emphasis Americans are placing on education, the high cost of college suggests it may be time to question the return on investment of your college degree.

    Full disclosure: I believe in education. The power of being informed runs deep and has a profound impact on society through scientific advancements, international discussions, cultural understanding, and even in ways one can’t anticipate. Learning should never cease.

    However, is “attending college” the only way to continue to learn? It certainly looks great on a resume, but is it the only way to gauge one’s ability to complete tasks or capacity to answer a question? I don’t have the answer to that, but what I can address is the amount of money students are borrowing to obtain their degrees. College costs money. And, when colleges are being run like businesses, the students are the consumers. They have the freedom of choice.

    To that end, here are my reasons why borrowing money for school might not be the best idea:

    Get offers for lower-interest rate debt consolidation loans here on ReadyForZero!

    College student loans

    No Proof of Ability to Pay the Money Back

    Private loans are lent by banks, and banks have one job – to make money. When they lend money, it is because they will make even more money back in interest. Further, student loan debt cannot be discharged in bankruptcy except in cases of extreme hardship and, even if a borrower defaults, the government guarantees the loans and will ensure the bank is paid back.

    This means banks have no reason to qualify their borrowers based on anything other than their need.

    As a borrower, however, you have every reason to consider how much you’re borrowing and how much money you will probably earn. Do you think you’ll be able to pay your loans off in a reasonable amount of time without serious sacrifice on your part? Even so, while the government might guarantee these private loans, nothing guarantees that you will graduate with a job.

    “Thank God I Have Student Loan Debt!”

    College has indeed made it possible to achieve personal and social greatness. Some people are indirectly grateful for their debt because it took them places, and made the impossible possible – but there is a tipping point that has been disregarded and that s what we need to evaluate.

    Account for Change

    Borrowing money is a serious, unwavering commitment. What if something changes? Similar to not being able to guarantee that you’ll have a job – what if you want to change your major to something less lucrative (but more fulfilling)? What if you have to take a leave of absence from school? These “what-ifs”, and more, are absolutely something to consider.

    Many, many students are paying back their loans for 20, 25, or 30 years into the future. Heck, as of July 2012, nearly 16% of people over the age of 50 are carrying student loan debt 3 , and they went to school when it was cheap. To be fair, many of them might be carrying debt on behalf of their children as they could have cosigned the loans. But, 16% of $1 trillion is $160 billion. Actually, this leads to another issue: putting your parents in a weird, debt-owing spot when they have their own retirement to worry about!

    Other Options

    Again, education is important. And largely it does require sacrifice from many students and families as the cost is quickly rising ($50K a year!?) Some of these sacrifices though, when combined, could put you ahead of the game.

    For instance, working throughout high school, and perhaps for a year between high school and college, may help you save a good chunk of your future tuition. Maybe that year off can also help you gain some perspective in terms of your future – career, location, et al. Imagine starting college armed with $10K? You’re welcome, Mom Dad. Volunteering and/or interning in addition to your job may aid in giving you valuable insight to what your interests might be, and what you’d like your future to look like. At least you’ll know what you are working toward from that point!

    “Cheap” (pshhhh) college for a year or two can help to keep you on track while you work, save, and/or volunteer. Taking a few mandatory courses at community college for a fraction of the cost than that of a 4-year school will also wind up saving you future money, if you do end up having to borrow for school.

    I borrowed quite a lot of money for my Bachelor’s degree, and know how it feels to be in life-halting debt, so I may sound a bit biased. On the contrary I do think borrowing for college is necessary a lot of the time considering the high cost of these institutions – perhaps not $200K worth, but the average debt load is just about 10% of that, at $25K. This is still a lot of money, but can be quite manageable depending on your salary. If you work at a not-for-profit or in certain urban areas, you may also be able to have your federal loans forgiven after a certain period of time, and bear in mind that federal loans are far more flexible than private loans.

    Never stop learning. The internet has been a great tool for exactly that – and libraries, museums, and meeting groups exist for the same purpose. Exploring your interests and forming educated opinions are part of what has propelled our society into advancement. We’re counting on our future generations to worry less about debt and more about making this world a much better place.

    1. Source: Student loans surpass auto, credit card debt Washington Post, March 2012 [ ]
    2. Source: Student Loan Debt Tops $1 Trillion Wall Street Journal, March 2012 [ ]
    3. Source: Nearly 16% of Post-50s Are Carrying Student Loan Debt Huffington Post, July 2012 [ ]

    College student loans

    This post was published by Ben, Content Manager and Writer for » ReadyForZero. ReadyForZero is a company that helps people get out of debt on their own with a simple and free online tool that can automate and track your debt paydown.



    FinAid, Loans, college student loans.#College #student #loans


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    An education loan is a form of financial aid that must be repaid, with interest. Education loans come in three major categories: student loans (e.g., Stafford and Perkins loans), parent loans (e.g., PLUS loans) and private student loans (also called alternative student loans). A fourth type of education loan, the consolidation loan, allows the borrower to lump all of their loans into one loan for simplified payment. A recent innovation is peer-to-peer education loans.

    College student loans

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    College student loans

    Grants, scholarships, work-study and other forms of gift aid just do not cover the full cost of a college education. Many students find that they must supplement their savings with government and private loans. The Federal education loan programs offer lower interest rates and more flexible repayment plans than most consumer loans, making them an attractive way to finance your education. You can also deduct up to $2,500 in student loan interest even if you don’t itemize deductions on your income tax return.



    EduPASS, Financial Aid for International Students, Loans for International Students, loans for college students.#Loans #for #college #students


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    Loans for International Students

    A few US banks will offer student loans to international students if the loan is co-signed by a creditworthy US citizen or permanent resident (holder of a “green card”). There may also be restrictions on the type of visa (F1 or J1). In addition to the loans listed below, certain international students (i.e., permanent US residents with a green card) may be eligible for Federal Stafford and PLUS loans.

  • Canadian Higher Education Loan Program (CanHELP). CanHELP is an alternative loan program for Canadian college and university students to study in the USA and approved schools throughout the world. The loans are offered by the International Education Finance Corporation (IEFC) working in conjunction with Bank of America, Fleet Boston, Citizens Bank, and The Education Resources Institute (TERI). Students may borrow up to the full cost of education, including tuition, fees, and room and board. Graduate students may borrow a maximum of $15,000 per year without a co-signer, or up to cost of education with a co-signer. The minimum loan amount is $1,000 per academic year. Students may take up to 20 years to repay the loan. There is a $50 minimum payment and some deferment provisions. The interest rate is the prime lending rate plus 0.5%. Undergraduate students must have a creditworthy Canadian citizen as co-signer. There is a 8.5% guarantee fee for undergraduate and graduate students with a co-signer. Graduate students can apply without a co-signer if they pay a 7.5% guarantee fee at disbursement and a 2% guarantee fee at repayment which will be financed into the loan. For more information write InternationalStudentLoan.com, 224 First Street, Neptune Beach, FL 32266, USA or visit International Student Loan, or send email to [email protected].

  • Credila Financial Services offers private education loans to students from India. Credila is a subsidiary of the Housing Development Finance Corporation (HDFC), the largest mortgage lender in India. The loans offer a variable interest rate with a 10-year repayment period. A family member or relative must cosign the loan. The loans are disbursed in Indian Rupees and must be repaid in Indian Rupees. The loans must be secured by collateral, such as a house, apartment/flat or non-agricultural land. Extensive supporting documents are required; failure to submit all the supporting documents may lead to denial of the loan or delays in approval. For more information, call 1-800-209-3636 in the USA or send email to [email protected].

  • Global Student Loan Corporation (GSLC). GSLC offers student loans for international students that do not require a US citizen or permanent resident to co-sign the loan. (A co-signer in the student’s home country may be required. Often this co-signer is the student’s parent or guardian.) GSLC works with financial institutions and banks located in the student’s home country to provide financing for the student’s education. GSLC’s President is Dr. Keith Jepsen, formerly the Director of Financial Aid at New York University. Currently more than three dozen schools participate in the GSLC loan program. Their web site also includes an International Student Planner. For more information, visit the GSLC web site, call 1-212-736-9666, fax 1-212-736-6536, send email to [email protected], or write to Global Student Loan Corporation, 350 Fifth Avenue, Suite 2416, New York, NY 10118 USA.

  • International Student Loan Program (ISLP) and Study Abroad Loan Progam (SALP). ISLP is an alternative loan program for international students to study at approved US colleges and universities. SALP is an alternative loan program for US citizens to study abroad. The loans offered by InternationalStudentLoan.com are funded by PNC Bank and guaranteed by The Education Resources Institute (TERI). Students may borrow up to the full cost of education, including tuition, fees, and room and board. The minimum loan amount is $1,500 per academic year. Students may take up to 25 years to repay the loan. There is a $25 minimum payment and some deferment provisions. A creditworthy US citizen or permanent resident must co-sign the loan. For more information write InternationalStudentLoan.com, 224 First Street, Neptune Beach, FL 32266, USA or visit International Student Loan, or send email to [email protected].

  • Norwest Bank (1-703-749-0131 or the financial aid department at 1-800-366-6227). These MBA loans are for graduate business and medical students who are international students. For more information write to Norwest Bank/HEMAR Insurance Corp., GMAC, 2400 Broadway Suite 320, Santa Monica, CA 90404-3064.

  • The Education Resources Institute (TERI) (1-800-255-8374 x210 or 1-617-426-0681). The TERI Professional Education Plan (PEP) loan is available for graduate and professional study. International students can borrow the cost of education up $20,000 per year (cumulative limit of $80,000) with a creditworthy US citizen as cosigner. Their lenders include Citibank (1-800-692-8200 x480), Bank of Boston (PO Box 312, Boston, MA 02117-0312), Baybank (1-800-332-8374 or 1-617-320-2422; PO Box 510, Dedham, MA 02026), and Nellie Mae (1-800-634-9308; 50 Braintree Hill Park, Braintree, MA 02184). Interest rates and fees may vary depending on the lender. For more information, call 1-800-255-TERI (1-800-255-8374), write to The Education Resources Institute (TERI), 330 Stuart Street, Suite 500, Boston, MA 02116-5237, or send email to [email protected].
  • When evaluating a loan program, it is important to carefully compare the costs. Some loans have interest rates pegged to the 91-day T-Bill Rate. Others use the Prime Lending Rate, which is approximately two to four percentage points higher.



    Can Students Pay Off Their Loans? Delinquency On College Debt Soars Above That Of Credit Cards, Mortgages, loans for college students.#Loans #for #college #students


    Can Students Pay Off Their Loans? Delinquency On College Debt Soars Above That Of Credit Cards, Mortgages

    Loans for college students

    Graduates-to-be walked before their commencement ceremony at the University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles, May 12, 2017. Photo: Reuters

    After increasing for 11 straight quarters, aggregate household debt toppled the previous peak in 2008, reaching a total of $12.73 trillion in the first three months of 2017, according to a quarterly report released Wednesday by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York. That total is 14 percent above the valley formed by the drop in household debt that followed the Great Recession, the result of a decrease in borrowing in the wake of the credit collapse.

    That’s not necessarily a bad thing, as the New York Times noted soon after the Fed report’s release. It signifies consumers’ greater access to credit, a harbinger of healthy economic growth and activity. But the report also harbored a real cause for concern, specifically for millennials. While aggregate student loan debt only made up 11 percent of the total — compared to mortgages, with 68 percent of household debt — the average delinquency rate for student loans has shot above all other forms of debt in recent years, and stayed there, according to the Fed report.

    The rise in aggregate mortgage loans may represent a comeback for the housing market, as that delinquency rate has plummeted to below 4 percent from its 2009 peak of over 12 percent. For serious delinquencies, or those of at least 90 days, the rate is closer to 1 percent, the Fed found.

    Student loans, by contrast, continued a dramatic rise in delinquencies that began about a dozen years earlier, with the rate of missed payments lingering around 10 percent today, up from around 8 percent in 2004. The rate of student loan delinquencies longer than 90 days has come close to 10 percent as well, up from under 6 percent in 2004. In terms of delinquency rates, the student debt category was followed by auto loans, with below 8 percent, and credit cards, with about 6 percent.

    There is a litany of reasons for the disparity, according to Melinda Kay Lewis, an associate professor of practice at the University of Kansas’ School of Social Welfare. For starters, she said, the average financial profile of the student borrower makes that type of debt “a very different animal” from, say, mortgage debt, owed by Americans who are generally older and more financially stable. Buying a house, she added, might appear as less imperative than buying the upward mobility that colleges are purported to provide.

    “For many students, it’s either no student loan financing or no school at all,” Lewis said. “People are really caught — they know that they need higher education to advance economically, but they have little ways to pay.”

    Student debt stood at a staggering nearly $1.44 trillion as of the first quarter, and the total — along with the delinquency rates noted in the Fed report — is bound to swell further.

    Much of the Fed’s response to the economic fallout of the Great Recession involved lowering its policy interest rate, the federal funds rate, which gave borrowers some relief by pushing interest rates on various forms of debt to follow suit. But to have a proper response to the next financial crisis, whenever it may be, the Fed needs to move its policy rate back up to what Fed Chair Janet Yellen often refers to as a “neutral” level of up to 3 percent, up from its current bandwidth of between 0.75 and 1 percent. (The central bank dropped the federal funds rate to nearly zero from above 5 percent in the wake of the recession, and has been raising it in 0.25-percent increments since December 2015.)

    Students with fixed interest rates or federal student loans taken out prior to 2006 have little to worry about, but the same can’t be said for other student borrowers.

    Yellen is expected to announce another increase in the rate at the conclusion of its monetary policy-making body’s next meeting, on June 14, after she said in a press conference that the Fed would delay a hike at its previous meeting in May.

    Loans for college students

    Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen spoke during a news conference after a two day Federal Open Market Committee (FOMC) meeting in Washington, D.C., March 15, 2017. Photo: Reuters

    Seeking to mitigate the issue ahead of the next Fed meeting, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) reintroduced a bill Wednesday that would permit student loan borrowers to refinance at current federal loan interest rates.

    “With interest rates scheduled to rise again this summer,” a press release announcing the measure noted, “the urgency for Congress to address the student debt crisis and to allow borrowers to access today’s lower rates is stronger than ever.”

    While it’s garnered widespread Democratic support, the bill’s previous iterations have fielded criticism for leaving out distressed borrowers, who likely wouldn’t qualify for refinancing, and forcing borrowers to pay a 0.5 percent fee that would come with a refinance.

    Loans for college students

    Sen. Elizabeth Warren spoke at an “Our Revolution” rally in Boston, March 31, 2017. Photo: Reuters

    For Lewis, the associate professor, a better answer would be a full transformation of how students pay for college, rather than smaller, patchwork remedies that end up leaving many students behind and don’t address the root of the problem.

    More scrutiny and awareness of the risks involved with for-profit colleges — which account for a disproportionate amount of student debt — earlier, “front-end” investing in kids’ educations and a revamp in public funding of public colleges would be a good start, Lewis said.

    After all, delinquency rates, she noted, are often higher for students with smaller loans who didn’t attend elite, big-name institutions, and are therefore seeing little return on their investment.

    “We have students from community colleges who can’t pay off their debt,” Lewis said, adding that the ramifications of college unaffordability for the broader economy could be detrimental. “One of my greatest fears with the student debt issue is that students will look around them and decide that the risk is too much.”