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Log Cabin Connection, Log Home Tips, Advice, Information and Resources, log book loan.#Log #book #loan


Do You Dream About

Living in a Log Cabin?

Welcome to Log Cabin Connection! This is a collection of tips, advice and resources pertaining to cabins and log homes, gleaned from years of experience as a licensed contractor and log home builder in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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Our aim is to provide a complete compendium of ideas and best practices for everyone intrigued by log home living. We will follow the process of achieving your dream of living in your own log home from start to finish.

Log Cabin Connection is a one-stop resource for questions, guidance, advice and practical step-by-step instructions for your log home needs.

Spend some time looking around or search the site using this search box:

PLANNING THE PERFECT LOG HOME

All great journeys begin with the first step, and this can be the most fun of all as you dream about the perfect cabin design and begin to make preparations by buying land for your cabin.

Do you see this as your long-term home? Consider universal design ideas that would allow you to retire in your cabin.

Learn about the different styles of logs used to build cabins and how you can save money right from the start with clever cabin design tips.

Are you concerned how you can finance a log home? We’ll cover:

We provide you with cabin floor plans as well as options and resources for online cabin plans. Or design your own cabin using log home design software that provides 3-dimensional views and virtual walk-throughs.

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BUILDING LOG CABINS

When you’re ready to begin building your log cabin, you can turn to this section where we cover all the best building practices and share the building tips we’ve learned building cabins. We discuss log home building tools and log home building schools. We cover everything from cabin roofing to SIPs to choosing the best cabin ceiling fans.

If you’re interested in cabins, you’re probably already interested in green living.

Some people will be interested in building with a log home kit so we share what to shop for, and discuss log home manufacturers, cabin kits and what you can expect to spend, the new trend towards smaller log homes, and the surprising value offered by modular log homes, including a prefab cabin construction timeline.

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LOG HOME LIVING

Every home requires on-going maintenance and log homes are no exception. To keep your log home in top shape we cover the issues unique to log homes:

Should it get a bit run-down, we cover cabin repair and the more extensive log home restoration, along with ideas and checklists for cabin inspections to help you evaluate a cabin you’re buying or your own cabin.

Our section on cabin rentals covers what to keep in mind when renting a cabin, some great areas of the country to visit while renting and some of the best honeymoon rentals available.

If you’re curious about the tiny house movement, you want to live off the grid with limited funds or you just want to enjoy the land you bought on the lake without building a large log home, check out our Small Cabin page for more information on:

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Ten Myths About Log Home Construction, log book loan.#Log #book #loan


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  1. Log homes are not energy efficient

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Most building codes only recognize “R” factor which does not take into account the tightness of a well built log home. It does not take in the mass of wood which holds the heat far better than a flimsy stud home. Recently a client of ours finished his log home manufactured of dry, Western red cedar logs. At that time he needed to get an air-tightness test from the county. It came in as the second tightest home they have ever tested. most of them being stud homes.

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In the late 90’s it got down to minus 27 degrees F in Pueblo, Co. We did not have any heat on in our 3,000 sq. ft. model home. The next morning I went in at 10 AM and there wasn’t a problem. The next morning it was minus 10 degrees and on Monday morning it was zero. The model was totally unheated for the whole weekend as we did not work over the weekend. The model had 9 tropical plants in it, including a fern in the window. I lost two African violets which are very sensitive to temperature. The fern in the bay window had no damage what-so-ever.

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In short, there is still a reason why log homes are still being built in very cold climates such as Canada and Alaska!

  • Termites and other wood boring insects will be attracted to log homes and set about devouring them

  • Log homes are more expensive than a conventional home

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    Of course a custom log home with 8 or 10-inch logs will cost more for the logs than a pile of 2×4’s and vinyl siding. But the logs will go up faster saving labor. I have also noted over the years that people who build a log home don’t finish it off with cheap carpeting, sheet rock, and fixtures. As the exterior walls are the least expensive of any home, the amenities installed within (wood flooring and ceilings, a fireplace, a solid wood paneling on the walls) can boost the price of the home substantially.

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    One of our clients told me many years ago that after the house was closed in from the weather, they felt that they were nearly done with the large expenditures for the construction of the home. They started buying better materials and upgrading the cabinets, carpet, etc. It wasn’t long before they realized that they were going to be running short of money to complete the home.

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    In short, a log home is comparable to a standard home, if you compare the same apples-to-apples.

  • Log homes are a fire hazard

  • Insurance rates are higher for log homes

  • Banks will not make a loan on a log home

  • Log homes will rot easily

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    Whenever I get a call from someone with a rotting problem, it is due to the fact they have defied basic logic and common sense. Furthermore they spend 4 hours each weekend on their lawn but never seem to be concerned about the home itself. The proof in the pudding is seeing the log structures in Europe (and the United States) that are in great shape after hundreds of years.

  • Log Homes require more time to build than a conventional stud home

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    A frame home has many steps; stud walls, exterior plywood, exterior roofer’s felt, and siding. For the interior the home is insulated, a vapor barrier installed sheet rock with its taping, sanding, taping, sanding, and finally the paint. Whew!

  • Most contractors cannot build a log home

  • The log home is hard to maintain

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    The first step in the maintenance of the log home is proper design (The Complete Guide to Log Homes). The next step is periodic maintenance with a good stain purchased from a company that specializes in log home products and not something off the shelf of a local discount store.

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    The exterior of the home is the main area of maintenance that must be taken care of during the life of the home. The interior stained or varnished walls will never need to be redone to any normal failure. If little Johnny smears the walls with marker or crayon, then drastic steps must be taken to bring the walls back to their original condition. Always remember that conventional homes with an exterior of paint must be refurbished periodically as well. There is no free lunch and there is no such thing as minimal or extended maintenance.

    Clyde Cremer holds a Master degree in Forestry from the Yale University School of Forestry and Environmental Studies in New Haven, CT, and has over 35 years of experience in the forestry industry.


  • Investors Who Foresaw the Meltdown, log book loans.#Log #book #loans


    The New York Times

    Michael Lewis’s ‘Big Short’: Investors Foresaw Meltdown

    The global financial crisis of 2008, which economists estimate could result in several trillion dollars of losses and which has already cost American taxpayers billions of dollars in government bailouts, was triggered not by war or recession but by a crazy, man-made money machine, built on flawed mathematical models that most financial executives did not really understand themselves. Greedy and heedless, Wall Street firms had been turning subprime mortgages — loans made to people with low creditworthiness or little documentation — into exotic, toxic financial products that they made a fortune laundering and reselling, and they were enabled in doing so by the very ratings agencies that were supposed to police risk. The insanity of this growing and highly leveraged trade in mortgage derivatives continued even as the quality of the underlying loans grew increasingly dubious, even as it became increasingly likely that the American housing bubble was going to pop.

    The clear and present danger posed by this deranged edifice built on the unstable foundation of subprime mortgages was not foreseen by the chief executives of America’s premier banks. It was not foreseen by government regulators, by Treasury officials or by the Fed. It was foreseen, however, by a handful of investors, who were aghast at the madness they saw on the Street and who used their prescience to make a fortune off the financial system’s calamitous meltdown. Some of their stories are told by Michael Lewis in “The Big Short.”

    No one writes with more narrative panache about money and finance than Mr. Lewis, the author of “Liar’s Poker,” that now classic portrait of 1980s Wall Street. His entertaining new book does not attempt a macro view of the financial crisis, but instead proposes to open a small window on the calamities by recounting the stories of some savvy renegades who cashed in on their conviction that the system was rotten. In doing so Mr. Lewis faces the same problem that the Wall Street Journal reporter Gregory Zuckerman faced in “The Greatest Trade Ever,” his recent book about John Paulson, a hedge fund manager who made $15 billion in 2007 by shorting the housing bubble — the problem, namely, that the reader is put in the position of rooting for people who, while smarter or more farsighted than those who helped bring about catastrophe in the first place, were nonetheless trying to make money (who saw a rare opportunity, as one put it) by betting against the health of our financial system.

    Still, Mr. Lewis does a nimble job of using his subjects’ stories to explicate the greed, idiocies and hypocrisies of a system notably lacking in grown-up supervision, a system filled with firms that “disdained the need for government regulation in good times” but “insisted on being rescued by government in bad times.”

    Mr. Lewis argues that the roots of the meltdown of 2008 can be found in the 1980s of “Liar’s Poker,” when complex financial products like mortgage derivatives were developed. He also suggests that these financial instruments (which had names like “the synthetic subprime mortgage bond-backed C.D.O., or collateralized debt obligation”) grew increasingly opaque and complex to help obscure the fact that they were built around increasingly suspect loans: “low-doc or no-doc loans” requiring little documentation, adjustable-rate mortgages that ballooned after two years, “interest-only negative-amortizing adjustable-rate subprime” mortgages, and mortgages given to migrant workers and poor immigrants with little or no English.

    Log book loans

    As Mr. Lewis describes it, Wall Street firms were able “to hide the risk by complicating it” and by getting the rating agencies — notably, Moody’s and Standard Poor’s — to give triple-A ratings to bonds that were far lower in quality. Why, he asks, “were Moody’s and Standard Poor’s willing to bless 80 percent of a pool of dicey mortgage loans with the same triple-A rating they bestowed on the debts of the U.S. Treasury?” Because, he suggests, Wall Street firms knew how to game the system; they knew how to get the rating agencies (which were eager to collect big fees for their services) to ineptly rate dangerous bonds. Most evaluation models, he observes, were based on rising house prices and used “the foreshortened, statistically meaningless past to predict the future”; this was how “the entire food chain of intermediaries in the subprime mortgage machine” was able to dupe itself.

    Writing in faintly Tom Wolfe-ian prose, Mr. Lewis does a colorful job of introducing the lay reader to the Darwinian world of the bond market: “An investor who went from the stock market to the bond market,” he writes, “was like a small, furry creature raised on an island without predators removed to a pit full of pythons.” He draws equally lively portraits of the central characters in his story. All, he notes, were oddballs or outsiders — people impervious to groupthink and conventional wisdom, and each of them, he says, “told you something about the state of the financial system, in the same way that people who survive a plane crash told you something about the accident, and also about the nature of people who survive accidents.”

    To begin with, there’s Steve Eisman, who had started out “a strident Republican” and was on his way “to becoming the financial market’s first socialist” as he grew increasingly convinced that “an entire industry, called consumer finance,” basically “existed to rip people off.” Mr. Eisman and his team “had a from-the-ground-up understanding of both the U.S. housing market and Wall Street,” Mr. Lewis writes, and by performing the sort of nitty-gritty credit analysis on mortgages (that should have been done before the loans were made in the first place), they realized that they could make a fortune by shorting the worst of the worst.

    Then there is Michael Burry, a doctor with Asperger’s syndrome, who’d become obsessed with investing and started a fund with money from a small settlement his family received when his father died after a medical misdiagnosis. Dr. Burry immersed himself in studying the bond market in 2004 and became convinced that lending standards had declined so alarmingly that he could make money by shorting subprime mortgage bonds; by the end of 2007, Mr. Lewis reports, “he would have realized profits of more than $720 million” for his fund.

    Finally, there is the “garage band hedge fund” started by Jamie Mai and Charlie Ledley in 2003 with a Schwab account containing $110,000 and housed in a shed in the back of a friend’s house in Berkeley, Calif. Mr. Ledley believed, Mr. Lewis writes, “that the best way to make money on Wall Street was to seek out whatever it was that Wall Street believed was least likely to happen, and bet on its happening.” In this case, his contrarian instincts told him, in Mr. Lewis’s words, that “the markets were predisposed to underestimating the likelihood of dramatic change.”

    Four and a half years later the American economy was in trouble, and, Mr. Lewis says, the fund run by Mr. Ledley, Mr. Mai and their partner, Ben Hockett, would net more than $80 million.


    Breakdown cover, Insurance, Route Planner, AA, log book loans.#Log #book #loans


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    Book a service

    With our easy to use online booking tool, you can book your Volkswagen in for a service at your chosen Volkswagen retailer at any time. If your vehicle is affected by the NOx emissions issue, you’ll receive a letter from us when the technical measure is ready to be applied. At this point, you’ll be able to book your vehicle in for the emissions service action online here, or, you can contact your local retailer. Letters will be sent throughout the coming year.

    • 1. of 6. Choose retailer
    • 2. Your vehicle
    • 3. Select work
    • 4. Select date
    • 5. Your details
    • 6. Review Confirm

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    You can choose the most convenient to you and have a number of courtesy options available to you, like loan car, collect and deliver

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    Investors Who Foresaw the Meltdown, log book loans.#Log #book #loans


    The New York Times

    Michael Lewis’s ‘Big Short’: Investors Foresaw Meltdown

    The global financial crisis of 2008, which economists estimate could result in several trillion dollars of losses and which has already cost American taxpayers billions of dollars in government bailouts, was triggered not by war or recession but by a crazy, man-made money machine, built on flawed mathematical models that most financial executives did not really understand themselves. Greedy and heedless, Wall Street firms had been turning subprime mortgages — loans made to people with low creditworthiness or little documentation — into exotic, toxic financial products that they made a fortune laundering and reselling, and they were enabled in doing so by the very ratings agencies that were supposed to police risk. The insanity of this growing and highly leveraged trade in mortgage derivatives continued even as the quality of the underlying loans grew increasingly dubious, even as it became increasingly likely that the American housing bubble was going to pop.

    The clear and present danger posed by this deranged edifice built on the unstable foundation of subprime mortgages was not foreseen by the chief executives of America’s premier banks. It was not foreseen by government regulators, by Treasury officials or by the Fed. It was foreseen, however, by a handful of investors, who were aghast at the madness they saw on the Street and who used their prescience to make a fortune off the financial system’s calamitous meltdown. Some of their stories are told by Michael Lewis in “The Big Short.”

    No one writes with more narrative panache about money and finance than Mr. Lewis, the author of “Liar’s Poker,” that now classic portrait of 1980s Wall Street. His entertaining new book does not attempt a macro view of the financial crisis, but instead proposes to open a small window on the calamities by recounting the stories of some savvy renegades who cashed in on their conviction that the system was rotten. In doing so Mr. Lewis faces the same problem that the Wall Street Journal reporter Gregory Zuckerman faced in “The Greatest Trade Ever,” his recent book about John Paulson, a hedge fund manager who made $15 billion in 2007 by shorting the housing bubble — the problem, namely, that the reader is put in the position of rooting for people who, while smarter or more farsighted than those who helped bring about catastrophe in the first place, were nonetheless trying to make money (who saw a rare opportunity, as one put it) by betting against the health of our financial system.

    Still, Mr. Lewis does a nimble job of using his subjects’ stories to explicate the greed, idiocies and hypocrisies of a system notably lacking in grown-up supervision, a system filled with firms that “disdained the need for government regulation in good times” but “insisted on being rescued by government in bad times.”

    Mr. Lewis argues that the roots of the meltdown of 2008 can be found in the 1980s of “Liar’s Poker,” when complex financial products like mortgage derivatives were developed. He also suggests that these financial instruments (which had names like “the synthetic subprime mortgage bond-backed C.D.O., or collateralized debt obligation”) grew increasingly opaque and complex to help obscure the fact that they were built around increasingly suspect loans: “low-doc or no-doc loans” requiring little documentation, adjustable-rate mortgages that ballooned after two years, “interest-only negative-amortizing adjustable-rate subprime” mortgages, and mortgages given to migrant workers and poor immigrants with little or no English.

    Log book loans

    As Mr. Lewis describes it, Wall Street firms were able “to hide the risk by complicating it” and by getting the rating agencies — notably, Moody’s and Standard Poor’s — to give triple-A ratings to bonds that were far lower in quality. Why, he asks, “were Moody’s and Standard Poor’s willing to bless 80 percent of a pool of dicey mortgage loans with the same triple-A rating they bestowed on the debts of the U.S. Treasury?” Because, he suggests, Wall Street firms knew how to game the system; they knew how to get the rating agencies (which were eager to collect big fees for their services) to ineptly rate dangerous bonds. Most evaluation models, he observes, were based on rising house prices and used “the foreshortened, statistically meaningless past to predict the future”; this was how “the entire food chain of intermediaries in the subprime mortgage machine” was able to dupe itself.

    Writing in faintly Tom Wolfe-ian prose, Mr. Lewis does a colorful job of introducing the lay reader to the Darwinian world of the bond market: “An investor who went from the stock market to the bond market,” he writes, “was like a small, furry creature raised on an island without predators removed to a pit full of pythons.” He draws equally lively portraits of the central characters in his story. All, he notes, were oddballs or outsiders — people impervious to groupthink and conventional wisdom, and each of them, he says, “told you something about the state of the financial system, in the same way that people who survive a plane crash told you something about the accident, and also about the nature of people who survive accidents.”

    To begin with, there’s Steve Eisman, who had started out “a strident Republican” and was on his way “to becoming the financial market’s first socialist” as he grew increasingly convinced that “an entire industry, called consumer finance,” basically “existed to rip people off.” Mr. Eisman and his team “had a from-the-ground-up understanding of both the U.S. housing market and Wall Street,” Mr. Lewis writes, and by performing the sort of nitty-gritty credit analysis on mortgages (that should have been done before the loans were made in the first place), they realized that they could make a fortune by shorting the worst of the worst.

    Then there is Michael Burry, a doctor with Asperger’s syndrome, who’d become obsessed with investing and started a fund with money from a small settlement his family received when his father died after a medical misdiagnosis. Dr. Burry immersed himself in studying the bond market in 2004 and became convinced that lending standards had declined so alarmingly that he could make money by shorting subprime mortgage bonds; by the end of 2007, Mr. Lewis reports, “he would have realized profits of more than $720 million” for his fund.

    Finally, there is the “garage band hedge fund” started by Jamie Mai and Charlie Ledley in 2003 with a Schwab account containing $110,000 and housed in a shed in the back of a friend’s house in Berkeley, Calif. Mr. Ledley believed, Mr. Lewis writes, “that the best way to make money on Wall Street was to seek out whatever it was that Wall Street believed was least likely to happen, and bet on its happening.” In this case, his contrarian instincts told him, in Mr. Lewis’s words, that “the markets were predisposed to underestimating the likelihood of dramatic change.”

    Four and a half years later the American economy was in trouble, and, Mr. Lewis says, the fund run by Mr. Ledley, Mr. Mai and their partner, Ben Hockett, would net more than $80 million.


    Breakdown cover, Insurance, Route Planner, AA, log book loans.#Log #book #loans


    log book loans

    Pay £115 or less for 5 star rated cover for your home

    What do you need?
    Advice
    Keep your home safe and warm
    Places to stay
    Places to eat and drink
    Things to do
    What do you need?
    Advice
    Secure your holiday money
    What do you need?
    Advice
    Secure your holiday money
    Car kits and accessories
    Bookshop
    Maps and Atlases
    Manage your finances
    Insurance customer?
    Your account
    Log in or register
    My AA Account

    Sign in to see your cover and request assistance online

    Don’t have a My AA account?

    You’ll need your policy or membership number

    Your Finances
    Your Driving Lessons

    Keep your big wheels turnin

    with unlimited callouts

    Log book loansLog book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/car-genie/car-genie-desktop-half-width-3.jpg” /> Log book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/car-genie/car-genie-tablet-half-width-3.jpg” /> Log book loansLog book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/financial-services/car-loans-desktop-half-width.jpg” /> Log book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/financial-services/car-loans-tablet-half-width.jpg” /> Log book loansLog book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/insurance/car-insurance/car-insurance-countryside-desktop-full-width-v-2.jpg” /> Log book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/insurance/car-insurance/car-insurance-countryside-desktop-full-width-v-2.jpg” /> Log book loans

    Breakdown cover, Insurance, Route Planner, AA, log book loans.#Log #book #loans


    log book loans

    Pay £115 or less for 5 star rated cover for your home

    What do you need?
    Advice
    Keep your home safe and warm
    Places to stay
    Places to eat and drink
    Things to do
    What do you need?
    Advice
    Secure your holiday money
    What do you need?
    Advice
    Secure your holiday money
    Car kits and accessories
    Bookshop
    Maps and Atlases
    Manage your finances
    Insurance customer?
    Your account
    Log in or register
    My AA Account

    Sign in to see your cover and request assistance online

    Don’t have a My AA account?

    You’ll need your policy or membership number

    Your Finances
    Your Driving Lessons

    Keep your big wheels turnin

    with unlimited callouts

    Log book loansLog book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/car-genie/car-genie-desktop-half-width-3.jpg” /> Log book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/car-genie/car-genie-tablet-half-width-3.jpg” /> Log book loansLog book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/financial-services/car-loans-desktop-half-width.jpg” /> Log book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/financial-services/car-loans-tablet-half-width.jpg” /> Log book loansLog book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/insurance/car-insurance/car-insurance-countryside-desktop-full-width-v-2.jpg” /> Log book loans/media/the-aa/related-product/insurance/car-insurance/car-insurance-countryside-desktop-full-width-v-2.jpg” /> Log book loans

    Log Cabin Connection, Log Home Tips, Advice, Information and Resources, log book loans.#Log #book #loans


    Do You Dream About

    Living in a Log Cabin?

    Welcome to Log Cabin Connection! This is a collection of tips, advice and resources pertaining to cabins and log homes, gleaned from years of experience as a licensed contractor and log home builder in the mountains of western North Carolina.

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    Our aim is to provide a complete compendium of ideas and best practices for everyone intrigued by log home living. We will follow the process of achieving your dream of living in your own log home from start to finish.

    Log Cabin Connection is a one-stop resource for questions, guidance, advice and practical step-by-step instructions for your log home needs.

    Spend some time looking around or search the site using this search box:

    PLANNING THE PERFECT LOG HOME

    All great journeys begin with the first step, and this can be the most fun of all as you dream about the perfect cabin design and begin to make preparations by buying land for your cabin.

    Do you see this as your long-term home? Consider universal design ideas that would allow you to retire in your cabin.

    Learn about the different styles of logs used to build cabins and how you can save money right from the start with clever cabin design tips.

    Are you concerned how you can finance a log home? We’ll cover:

    We provide you with cabin floor plans as well as options and resources for online cabin plans. Or design your own cabin using log home design software that provides 3-dimensional views and virtual walk-throughs.

    Log book loans

    Log book loans

    Log book loans

    Log book loans

    Log book loans

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    BUILDING LOG CABINS

    When you’re ready to begin building your log cabin, you can turn to this section where we cover all the best building practices and share the building tips we’ve learned building cabins. We discuss log home building tools and log home building schools. We cover everything from cabin roofing to SIPs to choosing the best cabin ceiling fans.

    If you’re interested in cabins, you’re probably already interested in green living.

    Some people will be interested in building with a log home kit so we share what to shop for, and discuss log home manufacturers, cabin kits and what you can expect to spend, the new trend towards smaller log homes, and the surprising value offered by modular log homes, including a prefab cabin construction timeline.

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    Log book loans

    LOG HOME LIVING

    Every home requires on-going maintenance and log homes are no exception. To keep your log home in top shape we cover the issues unique to log homes:

    Should it get a bit run-down, we cover cabin repair and the more extensive log home restoration, along with ideas and checklists for cabin inspections to help you evaluate a cabin you’re buying or your own cabin.

    Our section on cabin rentals covers what to keep in mind when renting a cabin, some great areas of the country to visit while renting and some of the best honeymoon rentals available.

    If you’re curious about the tiny house movement, you want to live off the grid with limited funds or you just want to enjoy the land you bought on the lake without building a large log home, check out our Small Cabin page for more information on:

    Log book loans

    Log book loans

    Log book loans