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FinAid, Calculators, Loan Calculator, monthly loan payment calculator.#Monthly #loan #payment #calculator


monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculatorMonthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

Monthly loan payment calculator

This Loan Payment Calculator computes an estimate of the size of your monthly loan payments and the annual salary required to manage them without too much financial difficulty. This loan calculator can be used with Federal education loans (Stafford, Perkins and PLUS) and most private student loans. (This student loan calculator can also be used as an auto loan calculator or to calculate your mortgage payments.)

This loan calculator assumes that the interest rate remains constant throughout the life of the loan. The Federal Stafford Loan has a fixed interest rate of 6.8% and the Federal PLUS loan has a fixed rate of 7.9%. (Perkins loans have a fixed interest rate of 5%.)

This loan calculator also assumes that the loan will be repaid in equal monthly installments through standard loan amortization (i.e., standard or extended loan repayment). The results will not be accurate for some of the alternate repayment plans, such as graduated repayment and income contingent repayment.

Loan fees are used to adjust the initial loan balance so that the borrower nets the same amount after the fees are deducted.

Some educational loans have a minimum monthly payment. Please enter the appropriate figure ($50 for Stafford Loans, $40 for Perkins Loans and $50 for PLUS Loans) in the minimum payment field. Enter a higher figure to see how much money you can save by paying off your debt faster. It will also show you how long it will take to pay off the loan at the higher monthly payment. You can also calculate private student loan eligibility on comparison sites like Credible.

The questions concerning enrollment status, degree program and total years in college are optional and are designed to evaluate whether the total debt is excessive. The total years in college should include the total number of years in college so far (or projected) corresponding to the loan balance, including previous degrees received.


Loan Payment Formula and Calculator, calculate loan payment.#Calculate #loan #payment


Loan Payment

Calculate loan payment

The loan payment formula is used to calculate the payments on a loan. The formula used to calculate loan payments is exactly the same as the formula used to calculate payments on an ordinary annuity. A loan, by definition, is an annuity, in that it consists of a series of future periodic payments.

The PV, or present value, portion of the loan payment formula uses the original loan amount. The original loan amount is essentially the present value of the future payments on the loan, much like the present value of an annuity.

It is important to keep the rate per period and number of periods consistent with one another in the formula. If the loan payments are made monthly, then the rate per period needs to be adjusted to the monthly rate and the number of periods would be the number of months on the loan. If payments are quarterly, the terms of the loan payment formula would be adjusted accordingly.

Standard Loan Payment

The loan payment formula shown is used for a standard loan amortized for a specific period of time with a fixed rate. Examples of specialized loans that do not apply to this formula include graduated payment, negatively amortized, interest only, option, and balloon loans.

An adjustable rate loan will use the formula shown but will need to be recalculated based on the remaining balance and remaining term for each new rate change.

Use of Loan Payment Formula

The loan payment formula can be used to calculate any type of conventional loan including mortgage, consumer, and business loans. The formula does not differ based on what the money is spent on, but only when the terms of repayment deviate from a standard fixed amortization.

Simple interest and amortized loans will generally have the same payment. The terms amortized and simple interest relate to how much of the payment is applied to principal and how much is applied to interest for each payment.

Simple interest loans rely on the date of payment to determine the amount of interest paid with the remaining amount going to principal. If a payment is made early, the interest portion of the payment will be less than if paid later. Less interest accrues when the amount is paid early because the loan balance will be less due to the extra principal payments.

On the other hand, an amortized loan has a predetermined amount of interest paid per payment so an earlier payment has no affect on lowering the principal balance sooner. Different companies and their loans will have different policies on how they are amortized. An example of how a company may amortize their loan, is by re-amortizing every year so that extra principal payments to the loan will only go in effect after a year to lower the monthly interest portions of the payment.

Alternative Loan Payment Formula

Calculate loan payment

The payment on a loan can also be calculated by dividing the original loan amount (PV) by the present value interest factor of an annuity based on the term and interest rate of the loan. This formula is conceptually the same with only the PVIFA replacing the variables in the formula that PVIFA is comprised of.


Mortgage Payment Calculator –, payment calculator loan.#Payment #calculator #loan


Mortgage Payment Calculator

Use our mortgage loan calculator to determine the monthly payments for any fixed-rate loan. Just enter the amount and terms, and our mortgage calculator does the rest. Click on “Show Amortization” Table to see how much interest you’ll pay each month and over the lifetime of the loan. The mortgage loan calculator will also show how extra payments can accelerate your payoff and save thousands in interest charges.

Amortization Table

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Whether you’re buying a new home or refinancing, our mortgage calculator can do the math for you. Simply enter the amount, term and interest rate to get your monthly payment amount. If you’re refinancing, enter the current balance on your mortgage into the loan amount section and input the new term and new rate that you’ll receive. Then click on the amortization table to see how much interest you’ll pay over the life of the loan. Add extra payments to find out how they can put your payoff schedule on the fast-track and save you thousands.

Keep in mind that this calculator only calculates the mortgage payment. It does not include taxes, insurance or other fees included in the purchase of your home.

Loan amount: The amount of money you’re borrowing. It’s the cost of your new home minus the down payment if you’re buying or the balance on your existing mortgage if refinancing.

Interest rate: The exact rate you will receive on your loan, not the APR.

Loan term: The length of time you have to pay off your loan (30- and 15-year fixed-rate loans are common terms).

Amortization table: Timetable detailing each monthly payment of a mortgage. Details include the payment, principal paid, interest paid, total interest paid and current balance for each payment period.

Monthly extra payment: Extra amount added to each monthly payment to reduce loan length and interest paid.

Yearly extra payment: Extra amount paid each year to reduce loan length and interest paid.

One-time extra payment: Extra amount added once to reduce loan length and interest paid.

Payment calculator loan


FinAid, Calculators, Loan Calculator, payment calculator loan.#Payment #calculator #loan


payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loanPayment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

Payment calculator loan

This Loan Payment Calculator computes an estimate of the size of your monthly loan payments and the annual salary required to manage them without too much financial difficulty. This loan calculator can be used with Federal education loans (Stafford, Perkins and PLUS) and most private student loans. (This student loan calculator can also be used as an auto loan calculator or to calculate your mortgage payments.)

This loan calculator assumes that the interest rate remains constant throughout the life of the loan. The Federal Stafford Loan has a fixed interest rate of 6.8% and the Federal PLUS loan has a fixed rate of 7.9%. (Perkins loans have a fixed interest rate of 5%.)

This loan calculator also assumes that the loan will be repaid in equal monthly installments through standard loan amortization (i.e., standard or extended loan repayment). The results will not be accurate for some of the alternate repayment plans, such as graduated repayment and income contingent repayment.

Loan fees are used to adjust the initial loan balance so that the borrower nets the same amount after the fees are deducted.

Some educational loans have a minimum monthly payment. Please enter the appropriate figure ($50 for Stafford Loans, $40 for Perkins Loans and $50 for PLUS Loans) in the minimum payment field. Enter a higher figure to see how much money you can save by paying off your debt faster. It will also show you how long it will take to pay off the loan at the higher monthly payment. You can also calculate private student loan eligibility on comparison sites like Credible.

The questions concerning enrollment status, degree program and total years in college are optional and are designed to evaluate whether the total debt is excessive. The total years in college should include the total number of years in college so far (or projected) corresponding to the loan balance, including previous degrees received.


4 Ways to Calculate Loan Payments, loan payment.#Loan #payment


How to Calculate Loan Payments

If you know how to calculate a loan payment, you can plan out your budget so there are no surprises. Using an online loan calculator is recommended, simply because of how easy it is to make mistakes when calculating long formulas on a regular calculator. It is critical to include taxes and insurance when calculating a mortgage payment as this will be required by most lenders. (See “Warnings.”)

Steps Edit

Method One of Three:

Using an Online Calculator Edit

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Method Two of Three:

Calculating Loan Payments Manually Edit

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment

Method Three of Three:

Understanding How Loans Work Edit

Loan payment

Loan payment

Loan payment


Loan Payment Formula and Calculator, loan payment.#Loan #payment


Loan Payment

Loan payment

The loan payment formula is used to calculate the payments on a loan. The formula used to calculate loan payments is exactly the same as the formula used to calculate payments on an ordinary annuity. A loan, by definition, is an annuity, in that it consists of a series of future periodic payments.

The PV, or present value, portion of the loan payment formula uses the original loan amount. The original loan amount is essentially the present value of the future payments on the loan, much like the present value of an annuity.

It is important to keep the rate per period and number of periods consistent with one another in the formula. If the loan payments are made monthly, then the rate per period needs to be adjusted to the monthly rate and the number of periods would be the number of months on the loan. If payments are quarterly, the terms of the loan payment formula would be adjusted accordingly.

Standard Loan Payment

The loan payment formula shown is used for a standard loan amortized for a specific period of time with a fixed rate. Examples of specialized loans that do not apply to this formula include graduated payment, negatively amortized, interest only, option, and balloon loans.

An adjustable rate loan will use the formula shown but will need to be recalculated based on the remaining balance and remaining term for each new rate change.

Use of Loan Payment Formula

The loan payment formula can be used to calculate any type of conventional loan including mortgage, consumer, and business loans. The formula does not differ based on what the money is spent on, but only when the terms of repayment deviate from a standard fixed amortization.

Simple interest and amortized loans will generally have the same payment. The terms amortized and simple interest relate to how much of the payment is applied to principal and how much is applied to interest for each payment.

Simple interest loans rely on the date of payment to determine the amount of interest paid with the remaining amount going to principal. If a payment is made early, the interest portion of the payment will be less than if paid later. Less interest accrues when the amount is paid early because the loan balance will be less due to the extra principal payments.

On the other hand, an amortized loan has a predetermined amount of interest paid per payment so an earlier payment has no affect on lowering the principal balance sooner. Different companies and their loans will have different policies on how they are amortized. An example of how a company may amortize their loan, is by re-amortizing every year so that extra principal payments to the loan will only go in effect after a year to lower the monthly interest portions of the payment.

Alternative Loan Payment Formula

Loan payment

The payment on a loan can also be calculated by dividing the original loan amount (PV) by the present value interest factor of an annuity based on the term and interest rate of the loan. This formula is conceptually the same with only the PVIFA replacing the variables in the formula that PVIFA is comprised of.


Financial Calculator, Free Online Calculators from, home loan payment calculator.#Home #loan #payment #calculator


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FinAid, Loans, student loans payment.#Student #loans #payment


student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans paymentStudent loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

An education loan is a form of financial aid that must be repaid, with interest. Education loans come in three major categories: student loans (e.g., Stafford and Perkins loans), parent loans (e.g., PLUS loans) and private student loans (also called alternative student loans). A fourth type of education loan, the consolidation loan, allows the borrower to lump all of their loans into one loan for simplified payment. A recent innovation is peer-to-peer education loans.

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Student loans payment

Grants, scholarships, work-study and other forms of gift aid just do not cover the full cost of a college education. Many students find that they must supplement their savings with government and private loans. The Federal education loan programs offer lower interest rates and more flexible repayment plans than most consumer loans, making them an attractive way to finance your education. You can also deduct up to $2,500 in student loan interest even if you don’t itemize deductions on your income tax return.


Student loans payment, student loans payment.#Student #loans #payment


A Look at the Shocking Student Loan Debt Statistics for 2017

Student loans payment

Updated: September 13, 2017

It s 2017 and Americans are more burdened by student loan debt than ever.

You ve probably heard the statistics: Americans owe over $1.45 trillion in student loan debt, spread out among about 44 million borrowers. That s about $620 billion more than the total U.S. credit card debt. In fact, the average Class of 2016 graduate has $37,172 in student loan debt, up six percent from last year.

But how does this break down at a more granular level? Are student loans being used to attend public or private universities? Is it mostly from four-year or graduate degrees? What percentage of overall graduates carry debt? Are more grads utilizing private student loan consolidation and refinancing?

Let s take a look.

BONUS: Get a PDF of these statistics to print out, save, or send

General student loan debt facts

First, let’s start with a general picture of the student loan debt landscape. The most recent reports indicate there is:

  • $1.45 trillion in total U.S. student loan debt
  • 44.2 million Americans with student loan debt
  • Student loan delinquency rate of 11.2% (90+ days delinquent or in default)
  • Average monthly student loan payment (for borrower aged 20 to 30 years): $351
  • Median monthly student loan payment (for borrower aged 20 to 30 yea rs ): $203

Public Service Loan Forgiveness statistics

As of Q1, 2017 (latest available data)

PSLF Borrowers: 611,598*

* Total number of borrowers who have one or more approved PSLF Employment Certification Forms (ECF)

Note that borrowers are self-identified based on submission of an ECF.

Federal student loan portfolio

(updated for Q2, 2017)

Now let’s dive into how much debt student loan borrowers carry by loan type, term, and more.

Student loan debt statistics by loan program:

Student loan debt statistics by loan type:

Student debt statistics by loan status (Direct Loan Program)

Student loan statistics by repayment plan (Direct Loan Program)

Student loan debt by servicer

(updated for June 30, 2016)

Data Source: National Student Loan Data System

More shocking student loan debt statistics

If those numbers weren’t stunning enough, here’s a closer look at how students accumulate debt based on the type of school they attend.

In 2012, 71 percent of students graduating from four-year colleges had student loan debt:

  • Represents 1.3 million students graduating with debt, increase from 1.1 million in 2008
  • 66 percent of graduates from public colleges had loans (average debt of $25,550)
  • 75 percent of graduates from private nonprofit colleges had loans (average debt of $32,300)
  • 88 percent of graduates from for-profit colleges had loans (average debt of $39,950)

Twenty percent of 2012 graduate loans were private

Graduates who received Pell Grants were likely to borrow, and borrow more:

  • 88 percent of graduates who received Pell Grants had student loans in 2012, with an average balance of $31,200
  • 53 percent of those who didn’t receive a Pell Grant had student loan debt and borrowed $4,750 less ($26,450)

Private student loan debt statistics

  • Private student loan debt is on the rise; $6.2 billion was borrowed in 2012-2013, up from $5.5 billion in 2011-2012
  • From 2011-2012, borrowers didn’t take advantage of federal student loans as much as they could have: 19 percent didn’t take out Stafford loans, 8 percent didn’t apply for federal financial aid, 11 percent applied for federal aid but didn’t take out a Stafford loan, 28 percent had Stafford loans but borrowed less than they were eligible for
  • In 2011-2012, 48 percent of private loan borrowers attended schools that had tuition costs of $10,000 or less
  • Nearly 1.4 million undergraduates borrowed private loans in 2011-2012

Graduate student loan debt

About 40 percent of the $1 trillion student loan debt was used to finance graduate and professional degrees.

Combined undergraduate and graduate debt by degree:

  • MBA = $42,000 (11% of graduate degrees)
  • Master of Education = $50,879 (16%)
  • Master of Science = $50,400 (18%)
  • Master of Arts = $58,539 (8%)
  • Law = $140,616 (4%)
  • Medicine and health sciences = $161,772 (5%)

Clearly, as these student loan debt statistics show, the cost of attending college is becoming a growing burden for a huge portion of Americans.

What are you doing to pay off your debt and ensure you aren’t another statistic? Be sure to let us know how we can help.


FinAid, Loans, Repayment Plans, Income-Based Repayment, monthly payment loans.#Monthly #payment #loans


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Monthly payment loans

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Monthly payment loans

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Monthly payment loans

Monthly payment loans

Monthly payment loans

The Income-Based Repayment (IBR) is best for borrowers who are experiencing financial difficulty, have low income compared with their debt, or who are pursuing a career in public service.

Income-based repayment is intended as an alternative to income sensitive repayment (ISR) and income contingent repayment (ICR). It is designed to make repaying education loans easier for students who intend to pursue jobs with lower salaries, such as careers in public service. It does this by capping the monthly payments at a percentage of the borrower’s discretionary income.

Income-based repayment is only available for federal student loans, such as the Stafford, Grad PLUS and consolidation loans. It is not available for Parent PLUS loans or for consolidation loans that include Parent PLUS loans. IBR is not available for Perkins loans, but it is available for consolidation loans that include Perkins loans. It is also not available for private student loans.

Capped at Percentage of Discretionary Income

Income-based repayment is similar to income-contingent repayment. Both cap the monthly payments at a percentage of your discretionary income, albeit with different percentages and different definitions of discretionary income. Income-based repayment caps monthly payments at 15% of your monthly discretionary income, where discretionary income is the difference between adjusted gross income (AGI) and 150% of the federal poverty line that corresponds to your family size and the state in which you reside. There is no minimum monthly payment. Unlike income-contingent repayment, which is available only in the Direct Loan program, income-based repayment is available in both the Direct Loan program and the federally-guaranteed student loan program, and loan consolidation is not required.

Income-based repayment is based on the adjusted gross income during the prior tax year. In some cases the prior year’s income figures may not be reflective of your financial circumstances. For example, your income may be lower this year due to job loss or a salary reduction. In such a circumstance you can file an alternative documentation of income form to get an adjustment to your monthly payment.

The maximum repayment period is 25 years. After 25 years, any remaining debt will be discharged (forgiven). Under current law, the amount of debt discharged is treated as taxable income, so you will have to pay income taxes 25 years from now on the amount discharged that year. But the savings can be significant for students who wish to pursue careers in public service. And because you will be paying the tax so long from now, the net present value of the tax you will have to pay is small.

A new public service loan forgiveness program will discharge the remaining debt after 10 years of full-time employment in public service. Unlike the 25-year forgiveness, the 10-year forgiveness is tax-free due to a 2008 IRS ruling. The borrower must have made 120 payments as part of the Direct Loan program in order to obtain this benefit.

In addition to discharging the remaining balance at the end of 25 years (10 years for public service), the IBR program also includes a limited subsidized interest benefit. If your payments don’t cover the interest that accrues, the government pays or waives the unpaid interest (the difference between your monthly payment and the interest that accrued) on subsidized Stafford loans for the first three years of income-based repayment.

Who Will Benefit from IBR?

The IBR program is best for students who will be pursuing public service careers and borrowers with high debt and low income. Having a large household size also helps. Borrowers who have only a short-term temporary income shortfall may be better off seeking an economic hardship deferment.

If the borrower’s income is near or below 150% of the poverty line, the monthly payment under IBR will be $0. In effect, IBR will then function like the economic hardship deferment for the first three years and like a forbearance thereafter.

Students who are not pursuing careers in public service may be intimidated by the thought of a 25-year repayment term. However, it is worth careful consideration, especially by students who might be considering using an extended or graduated repayment plan. IBR will likely provide the lowest monthly payment for many low income borrowers and certainly is a reasonable alternative to defaulting on the loans.

Calculating the Benefit of IBR

Since the monthly payment and financial benefits depend on the borrower’s family size and income trajectory, it is best to use a specialized calculator to evaluate the benefits on a personalized level.

Calculating the cost of a loan in the IBR program can be somewhat complex, in part due to the need to make assumptions about future income and inflation increases. FinAid provides a powerful Income-Based Repayment Calculator that lets you compare the IBR program with standard and extended repayment. You can compare the costs under a variety of scenarios, including the possibility of starting off with a lower income and later switching to job with a higher salary.

Can Switch Repayment Plans

An important feature of the government’s IBR program is that although you must initially sign up for 25-year income-based or income-contingent repayment, you are not locked into this payment plan. If your circumstances change or if you just decide that you want to pay off your loan more rapidly, you may do so. (Borrowers who switch into Direct Lending in order to obtain public service loan forgiveness are limited to the IBR, ICR and standard repayment plans.)

New Version of IBR Starts in Fall 2012

The Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010 cuts the monthly payment under IBR by a third, from 15% of discretionary income to 10% of discretionary income, and accelerates the loan forgiveness from 25 years to 20 years. However, it is only effective for new borrowers of new loans on or after July 1, 2014. Borrowers who have federal loans before that date are not eligible for the improved income-based repayment plan. Public service loan forgiveness remains available in the new IBR plan.

A separate 10% version of the income-based repayment plan calculator is available for borrowers who qualify for the improved income-based repayment plan.

Borrowers who don’t qualify for income-based repayment may wish to review FinAid’s section on Trouble Repaying Debt. For example, such borrowers may wish to consider the economic hardship deferment, forbearances or extended repayment for their federal loans. Options for repayment relief on private student loans are more limited.