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ECU offers innovative and practical courses across a variety of disciplines and we have a vibrant research culture. ECU is a leader in developing alternative entry pathways to higher education.

We have three campuses in Western Australia. Joondalup and Mount Lawley in the Perth metropolitan area and our South West campus in Bunbury, 200km south of the Perth CBD.

ECU provides a variety of services and facilities that go beyond the classroom, with opportunities for personal development and social interaction for students and staff.

Future Students

Applicants with an ATAR

  • If you want to start a course in Semester 1, apply through the Tertiary Institutions Service Centre .
  • If you want to start a course in Semester 2 (mid-year), you can apply direct to us .

Note: Applying is different to enrolling. If your application for a course is successful and you accept our offer of a place, you then enrol by selecting your course units.

Applicants with a VET qualification

  • If you’ve completed a Certificate IV during or right after year 12, you can apply direct to us for undergraduate or University Preparation courses .
  • If you’re currently in Year 12, we expect you to achieve WACE by the end of the year.
  • If you’re not currently in Year 12, and don’t yet meet English competency, please apply to us with your Certificate IV and we will evaluate your application individually.
  • If your Diploma or Advanced Diploma is in the same subject area as the course you wish to study at ECU, you may be eligible for credit, or advanced standing. You can apply for this after you accept your offer into the course.

Note: Applying is different to enrolling. If your application for a course is successful and you accept our offer of a place, you then enrol by selecting your course units.

All other applicants

  • You can apply direct to us. Before you start your application, make sure you’ve made scanned copies of school or other study results and the components of your portfolio if you’re using our Portfolio Pathway .
  • Please ensure the University Preparation course is listed as a preference in your application.
  • If you’ve been an ECU student and are using an ATAR from previous years, or sat the STAT or the ISIT at ECU, we don’t need documents because we can check your score electronically.

Note: Applying is different to enrolling. If your application for a course is successful and you accept our offer of a place, you then enrol by selecting your course units.

Research degrees

Some research degrees have recommended submission dates for applications.

Our Doctor of Philosophy (course code L61) accepts applications all year long.

To apply for a research degree, please supply the following with your application:

  • a 300-word research abstract and a 2-page research proposal
  • facts about your work and academic history
  • references from any publications or conference papers you’ve co-authored
  • your previous academic qualifications

Note: If you’re a citizen of India, Pakistan, Nepal or Bangladesh, we may require you to apply via an ECU Authorised Agent .

Check the progress of your application

If you’ve applied for a course – either directly or through an ECU Authorised Agent – you can easily track its progress through our application status check .

What happens after you’ve applied?

After your application is processed and if you’re successful:

  1. We send you an Offer Letter for a place at ECU. This will be an Offer or a Conditional Offer (you must meet the conditions of your offer), and includes course details, fees to pay and more.
  2. You complete the online acceptance and pay the ‘Fees payable now’. This includes your first semester course fees and Overseas Student Health Cover. You can accept and pay by going to the Respond to your offer page.
  3. Once you’ve successfully accepted your offer to study at ECU, and we’ve confirmed receipt of the required fees, we’ll issue a Confirmation of Enrolment. If required, this document allows you to apply for a student visa to study in Australia.
  4. Once the above steps are complete, we welcome you as an official ECU student. You should then review our pre-departure information. attend orientation and enrol in your study units.

Funding for postgraduate study. #no #teletrack #payday #loans


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Funding for postgraduate study

You can get funding for postgraduate study through studentships, bursaries, grants and loans – you might also get help from your employer.

Studentships

Studentships are postgraduate positions that have funding attached for fees, living expenses or both. They’re mainly funded by Research Councils UK.

Teacher training, social work, medical and healthcare courses

You can apply for funding for:

Graduate-entry medical students can also get support from Student Finance England for fees charged over £3,465.

Charities and trusts

Charities and trusts sometimes provide grants, often for students from poorer backgrounds or those who’ve achieved academic excellence. Find out more at your local library in these publications:

  • the Educational Grants Directory
  • the Charities Digest
  • the Grants Register
  • the Directory of Grant Making Trusts

Learned societies

Societies sometimes offer funding for postgraduate or postdoctoral research. They include:

  • the British Academy (for humanities and social sciences – postdoctorate only)
  • the Royal Academy of Engineering (for engineering)
  • the Royal Society (for science – postdoctorate only)

Graduate Student Loans – What are the Options for Postgraduate Funding? #hard #money #loans


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Graduate Student Loans

By Justin Pritchard. Banking/Loans Expert

Justin Pritchard helps consumers navigate the world of banking.

Education isn’t cheap. If you’re going to graduate from school but you need a little extra to cover the costs, you have a few options. Some of them are similar to the loans you may have used for an undergraduate degree, and some may be specific to your field of study.

Continue Reading Below

In general, government sponsored loans have lower rates and are more flexible when it comes to repayment. See Advantages of Federal Student Loans for specifics.

Be aware that as a graduate student you can no longer enjoy the benefits of a subsidized loan. Interest will begin to accrue as soon as you get the money.

There are three types of federal student loans available.

Perkins Loans should be your first choice. Unfortunately, they’re hard to qualify for. Perkins loans are designed for students who demonstrate “financial need.” Your school might not even offer Perkins loans, and if it does you’ll have to compete with other students for limited resources.

These loans are most attractive because of their low interest rate. You’ll pay a fixed interest rate of 5%, which is better than you can do with most other lenders. As a graduate student, the most you can borrow per year using a Perkins loan is $8,000.

Direct Unsubsidized Loans are another good option for graduate students (these may also be referred to as “Stafford Loans”). These loans allow you to borrow up to $20,500 per year for graduate school. You’ll pay a fixed interest rate of 6.8% and a 1% origination fee.

Continue Reading Below

This is more expensive than a Perkins Loan but most likely less expensive than offers you’ll get from private lenders. Of course, you should always shop around, especially if you have good credit and can get a great deal from a private lender. Direct Unsubsidized Loans are easy to qualify for as long as you’re enrolled as a student — you don’t need to have a good credit score or income.

Direct PLUS Loans (sometimes called “Graduate PLUS Loans”) are available if you still need money after you’ve exhausted your Direct Unsubsidized Loans. However, you have to qualify for PLUS loans. You can only borrow as much as needed for your “cost of attendance” minus any other financial aid you’ve received (such as Direct Unsubsidized Loans and Perkins Loans). You also have to have a credit history that is clear of certain events in the recent past. Bankruptcy, tax liens, repossessions, and other events in your credit files may mean that you have to find a co-signer to qualify for the loan. Graduate PLUS Loans come with an interest rate of 7.9% and an origination fee of 4%.

To apply for any of the loans above, visit your school’s Financial Aid Office. It’s best to start the process as soon as possible if you think you’ll want to borrow money. Gather information and submit your FAFSA early in the year — preferably in January. Submitting your FAFSA early improves your chances of getting grants and other types of financial aid.

Private Loans for Graduate Students

After you’ve borrowed everything you can through the government, you can apply for loans with private lenders.

This is probably a good time for a common-sense reminder: just because you can borrow more, it doesn’t mean that you should. Remember that you’ll have to pay these loans back, and they may haunt you for many years. Student loans are a great way to invest in your future, but there are countless horror stories out there about people who got in over their heads.

  • Alternatives to Private Student Loans

Private student loans are available from a variety of lenders. Banks, credit unions, and online lenders offer private student loan products. Unlike the government, private lenders require that you qualify to borrow. You’ll need good credit and sufficient income to repay the loan, or you’ll need a co-signer who has those characteristics. Most graduate students are fairly young — just getting started in the world — and they have a hard time qualifying on their own.

  • What is Credit?

How much can you borrow from a private lender when you’re a graduate student? It depends on the lender and your field of study. In general, you can borrow more if you’re studying for a profession that tends to have higher earnings. In other words, future doctors and lawyers get to borrow more than future librarians.

Private lenders even offer products that are specific to your field of study, and this is where they may be more attractive than federal student loans. After you graduate, you may need to complete internship hours, pass licensing exams, or earn industry certifications. Some private graduate student loans include provisions that help cover your living expenses while you complete these tasks.

How do you apply for a private loan? There are too many types of private graduate student loans to discuss here — products vary from lender to lender and depend on your field of study. Start by searching for private loans, and narrow your search by focusing on the type of degree you’re pursuing. Be prepared to provide financial information to the lender, including bank statements, pay stubs, and school documents.


Funding for postgraduate study. #consolidation #loan #rates


#graduate student loans
#

Funding for postgraduate study

You can get funding for postgraduate study through studentships, bursaries, grants and loans – you might also get help from your employer.

Studentships

Studentships are postgraduate positions that have funding attached for fees, living expenses or both. They’re mainly funded by Research Councils UK.

Teacher training, social work, medical and healthcare courses

You can apply for funding for:

Graduate-entry medical students can also get support from Student Finance England for fees charged over £3,465.

Charities and trusts

Charities and trusts sometimes provide grants, often for students from poorer backgrounds or those who’ve achieved academic excellence. Find out more at your local library in these publications:

  • the Educational Grants Directory
  • the Charities Digest
  • the Grants Register
  • the Directory of Grant Making Trusts

Learned societies

Societies sometimes offer funding for postgraduate or postdoctoral research. They include:

  • the British Academy (for humanities and social sciences – postdoctorate only)
  • the Royal Academy of Engineering (for engineering)
  • the Royal Society (for science – postdoctorate only)

Funding for postgraduate study. #loan #consolidation


#graduate student loans
#

Funding for postgraduate study

You can get funding for postgraduate study through studentships, bursaries, grants and loans – you might also get help from your employer.

Studentships

Studentships are postgraduate positions that have funding attached for fees, living expenses or both. They’re mainly funded by Research Councils UK.

Teacher training, social work, medical and healthcare courses

You can apply for funding for:

Graduate-entry medical students can also get support from Student Finance England for fees charged over £3,465.

Charities and trusts

Charities and trusts sometimes provide grants, often for students from poorer backgrounds or those who’ve achieved academic excellence. Find out more at your local library in these publications:

  • the Educational Grants Directory
  • the Charities Digest
  • the Grants Register
  • the Directory of Grant Making Trusts

Learned societies

Societies sometimes offer funding for postgraduate or postdoctoral research. They include:

  • the British Academy (for humanities and social sciences – postdoctorate only)
  • the Royal Academy of Engineering (for engineering)
  • the Royal Society (for science – postdoctorate only)