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Private Student Loans for Undergraduate and Graduate Students, SunTrust Student Loans, student loans without cosigner.#Student #loans #without #cosigner


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    High school seniors and current college students can enter for a chance to win a $500 scholarship! No purchase necessary. Terms apply.

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    Servicemembers Civil Relief Act (SCRA)

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    Education Center

    Paying for college can be a challenge. SunTrust can help navigate the options.

    Before you look into paying for your college expenses, it’s important to know how much money you’ll need. Our money management resources, tools, and budgeting tips can help.

    Use our college tuition guide and step-by-step guide to paying for college for planning advice on how to avoid getting too over-burdened with debt before you’ve earned a degree.

    Before you get a loan, we encourage you to try getting scholarships and grants first. Our list of online resources can help. You can also register for the SunTrust Off to College Scholarship Sweepstakes (see Official Rules for details).

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    SunTrust Education Lending | 1001 Semmes Avenue, Mail Code: RVW 7076 | Richmond, VA 23224

    SunTrust Bank, Member FDIC. 2017 SunTrust Banks, Inc.

    SunTrust and Custom Choice Loan are federally registered service marks of SunTrust Banks, Inc.

    SunTrust recommends comparing all aid alternatives including grants, scholarships, and federal student loans, prior to applying for a private student loan. Before selecting a private student loan, compare options offered by SunTrust.

    Union Federal is a federally registered trademark of Cognition Financial Corporation used by SunTrust Bank under license. The Union Federal Private Student Loan is funded by SunTrust Bank and is not affiliated with any other lender. Certain restrictions and limitations may apply. SunTrust Bank reserves the right to change or discontinue this program without notice. This loan program is subject to approval under the SunTrust credit policy and other criteria and may not be available in certain jurisdictions. SunTrust is a federally registered service mark of SunTrust Banks, Inc. Cognition Financial Corporation is not an affiliate of SunTrust Bank.

    1 Interest rate reductions offered for automatic payment from a bank account: 0.25% interest rate reduction for ACH payment from any bank account and an extra 0.25% interest rate reduction when ACH payments are made from a SunTrust Bank account. ACH interest rate reduction(s) apply when full payments (including both principal and interest) are automatically drafted from a bank account. Interest rate reduction(s) will remain on the account unless (1) the automatic deduction of payments is stopped (including times during deferment or forbearance) or (2) there are three automatic deductions returned for insufficient funds within the life of the loan. The additional SunTrust Bank account ACH interest rate reduction is available for loans first disbursed on or after 6/1/11 and will be applied after the first automatic payment is successfully deducted from a SunTrust Bank checking, savings or money market account and will be removed for the reasons stated above or if you close your SunTrust Bank account. In the event the benefit(s) is removed, the interest rate stated in the Credit Agreement shall be applied in accordance with the terms of the Credit Agreement.


  • Student Life, North Greenville University, discovery student loans.#Discovery #student #loans


    Student Life at North Greenville University

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    FinAid, Loans, Student Loans, apply for student loans.#Apply #for #student #loans


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    Student loan options can be overwhelming at first glance. But when it comes to federal student loans, there are just a few options.

    The first step in getting one of the federal student loans listed below is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. While the FAFSA does determine eligibility for need-based aid, it also acts as an application for student loan options, both for need-based and non-need-based loans. It supplies students who need financial aid with that help as well as provides financing options for those students that would like to borrow with low-interest federal loans but don’t necessarily qualify for need-based aid.

    Subsidized Stafford Loan

    The subsidized Stafford Loan is available to students who qualify for need as determined by the FAFSA. Students must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen as well as have a high school diploma or GED. Like most federal student loans, interest does not accrue while the student is in school. If students qualify for a subsidized Stafford Loan, it will be stated on their award letter notification along with the amount for which they can borrow.

    The Perkins Loan is another federal loan option that is for needy students. Again, students must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen as well as hold a high school diploma or GED. Again, interest does not accrue with the Perkins Loan, and students will find out whether or not they qualify as well as for how much when they receive their award letters from colleges.

    Unsubsidized Stafford Loan

    Finally, the unsubsidized Stafford Loan is a little different from the other federal loans. For both the subsidized Stafford and Perkins Loans, students must qualify for need as determined by the FAFSA. However, the unsubsidized Stafford Loan is available to any student, regardless of need. Also, unlike the other federal loans, interest accrues while the student is attending school. Again, if students want to apply for the unsubsidized Stafford Loan, they must complete the FAFSA.

    Students can also qualify for a federal student loan consolidation after graduating from college or graduate school.


    FinAid, Loans, Student Loans, apply for student loans.#Apply #for #student #loans


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    Student loan options can be overwhelming at first glance. But when it comes to federal student loans, there are just a few options.

    The first step in getting one of the federal student loans listed below is to fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA. While the FAFSA does determine eligibility for need-based aid, it also acts as an application for student loan options, both for need-based and non-need-based loans. It supplies students who need financial aid with that help as well as provides financing options for those students that would like to borrow with low-interest federal loans but don’t necessarily qualify for need-based aid.

    Subsidized Stafford Loan

    The subsidized Stafford Loan is available to students who qualify for need as determined by the FAFSA. Students must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen as well as have a high school diploma or GED. Like most federal student loans, interest does not accrue while the student is in school. If students qualify for a subsidized Stafford Loan, it will be stated on their award letter notification along with the amount for which they can borrow.

    The Perkins Loan is another federal loan option that is for needy students. Again, students must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen as well as hold a high school diploma or GED. Again, interest does not accrue with the Perkins Loan, and students will find out whether or not they qualify as well as for how much when they receive their award letters from colleges.

    Unsubsidized Stafford Loan

    Finally, the unsubsidized Stafford Loan is a little different from the other federal loans. For both the subsidized Stafford and Perkins Loans, students must qualify for need as determined by the FAFSA. However, the unsubsidized Stafford Loan is available to any student, regardless of need. Also, unlike the other federal loans, interest accrues while the student is attending school. Again, if students want to apply for the unsubsidized Stafford Loan, they must complete the FAFSA.

    Students can also qualify for a federal student loan consolidation after graduating from college or graduate school.


    Student Financial Aid, University of Cincinnati, student financial aid.#Student #financial #aid


    University of Cincinnati

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    A college education is one of the most important investments you will ever make — an investment in yourself and your future. You are sure to find that college will be one of the most personally rewarding and demanding challenges you will ever take on, and like most students and parents, you have some concerns about paying for your education.

    We believe that, regardless of your income, you have the potential to afford the quality education that the University of Cincinnati provides. We are committed to making your college education as affordable as we can. In fact, nearly all students are eligible for some form of financial assistance.

    Financial aid will likely not meet all of your educational costs. But use of financial aid can reduce out-of-pocket expenses you (or your family) may assume while in college.

    Key to receiving aid is applying and doing so in a timely manner. Because some aid programs are awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis, an early application receives priority consideration for limited funding sources. Complete your Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) as soon after October 1 of each year as possible to apply for aid for the upcoming academic year.

    This Website provides detailed information to help you seek out answers to questions, check your status, understand issues surrounding offered aid, and plan for your college costs.

    Your future is exciting! The Student Financial Aid Office is excited to be part of it and help you achieve your educational goals.

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    National Student Clearinghouse, student aid.#Student #aid


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    Student Privacy Matters at the Clearinghouse!

    The Clearinghouse s Commitment to Student Privacy Is Recognized by Privacy Leaders

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    Read the latest Clearinghouse news on our Media Center.

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    Our Research Center provides student outcomes data and more. Visit www.nscresearchcenter.org

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    Subscribe to our blog for the latest information on the Clearinghouse, its services, and reports at nscblog.org.

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    Student Loan Help, help with student loan debt.#Help #with #student #loan #debt


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    Goodbye, student loan debt. Hello, future!

    Help with student loan debt

    Get student debt answers now.

    A nonprofit NFCC Certified Student Loan Counselor will review all of your finances and help you develop a personal debt repayment plan, all for a nominal fee.*

    What s in it for you

    • A thorough evaluation of your entire personal financial situation—not just your student loans.
    • An audit of your current loans and their terms.
    • Comprehensive, one-on-one guidance through all student debt repayment options.
    • A full financial game plan, including which debt repayment plans are right for you.

    Here s what comes next

    • Set up a secure login.
    • Create your own confidential, financial profile online.
    • Be contacted by a nonprofit NFCC member agency.

    Ready? Set up your profile here.

    *Nonprofit, student loan counseling fees vary by NFCC member agency.

    I made the call. 1

    Help with student loan debt

    None of this was my fault, but it was my problem. Years ago, I co-signed a student loan with my then-husband. After we divorced, it stayed in his name. I made payments until the bank notified me the debt was forgiven. It wasn’t.

    Julie K Minnesota

    I didn’t leave school by choice. Two major health issues made the decision for me. By then, I had about $14,500 in federal student loans. Given my circumstances, I defaulted.

    1 Stories above represent actual NFCC client experiences.

    Student loan counseling.

    Comprehensive

    review of your financial situation, including current income, living expenses, all debt and your long-term goals.

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    game plan that doesn’t undermine your personal short- and long-term goals by just directing you to a plan with the lowest current payment.

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    NFCC member agencies have office locations in all 50 states and Puerto Rico, which are staffed by NFCC Certified Credit Counselors.

    Be informed.

    Knowledge is power. To help you make the best decisions possible for your future, we keep you updated with access to a wealth of useful tools and resources.

    Get the latest insights on recent news regarding student loans and your personal finances.

    From calculators to definitions, find what you need to make better financing and repayment decisions here.

    Who is the NFCC?

    Founded in 1951, the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC ) is the nation’s first and largest nonprofit dedicated to improving people’s financial well-being.

    NFCC members help millions of consumers like you through community-based offices located in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. Each NFCC member agency has earned our seal by adhering to high standards and ethical practices designed to help you achieve financial stability.

    Member agencies are able to offer their services for nominal fees based on their current funding status. Funding for operations and services comes from an ever-changing combination of federal, state and local government grants, as well as donations from financial industry participants and private donors.

    For more on the NFCC, visit www.NFCC.org

    Thank you to our funders.

    The Sharpen Your Financial Focus program is an initiative of the National Foundation for Credit Counseling (NFCC) in partnership with a broad cross-section of supporters. Together, we are committed to increasing the financial well-being of Americans. This initiative is partially funded by Bank of America, Chase, Synchrony Financial, Wells Fargo and other major financial institutions. We thank all funders and partners who make this program possible. For more information, visit www.SharpenToday.org.

    National Foundation for Credit Counseling


    Help with student loan debt, help with student loan debt.#Help #with #student #loan #debt


    A Look at the Shocking Student Loan Debt Statistics for 2017

    Help with student loan debt

    Updated: September 13, 2017

    It s 2017 and Americans are more burdened by student loan debt than ever.

    You ve probably heard the statistics: Americans owe over $1.45 trillion in student loan debt, spread out among about 44 million borrowers. That s about $620 billion more than the total U.S. credit card debt. In fact, the average Class of 2016 graduate has $37,172 in student loan debt, up six percent from last year.

    But how does this break down at a more granular level? Are student loans being used to attend public or private universities? Is it mostly from four-year or graduate degrees? What percentage of overall graduates carry debt? Are more grads utilizing private student loan consolidation and refinancing?

    Let s take a look.

    BONUS: Get a PDF of these statistics to print out, save, or send

    General student loan debt facts

    First, let’s start with a general picture of the student loan debt landscape. The most recent reports indicate there is:

    • $1.45 trillion in total U.S. student loan debt
    • 44.2 million Americans with student loan debt
    • Student loan delinquency rate of 11.2% (90+ days delinquent or in default)
    • Average monthly student loan payment (for borrower aged 20 to 30 years): $351
    • Median monthly student loan payment (for borrower aged 20 to 30 yea rs ): $203

    Public Service Loan Forgiveness statistics

    As of Q1, 2017 (latest available data)

    PSLF Borrowers: 611,598*

    * Total number of borrowers who have one or more approved PSLF Employment Certification Forms (ECF)

    Note that borrowers are self-identified based on submission of an ECF.

    Federal student loan portfolio

    (updated for Q2, 2017)

    Now let’s dive into how much debt student loan borrowers carry by loan type, term, and more.

    Student loan debt statistics by loan program:

    Student loan debt statistics by loan type:

    Student debt statistics by loan status (Direct Loan Program)

    Student loan statistics by repayment plan (Direct Loan Program)

    Student loan debt by servicer

    (updated for June 30, 2016)

    Data Source: National Student Loan Data System

    More shocking student loan debt statistics

    If those numbers weren’t stunning enough, here’s a closer look at how students accumulate debt based on the type of school they attend.

    In 2012, 71 percent of students graduating from four-year colleges had student loan debt:

    • Represents 1.3 million students graduating with debt, increase from 1.1 million in 2008
    • 66 percent of graduates from public colleges had loans (average debt of $25,550)
    • 75 percent of graduates from private nonprofit colleges had loans (average debt of $32,300)
    • 88 percent of graduates from for-profit colleges had loans (average debt of $39,950)

    Twenty percent of 2012 graduate loans were private

    Graduates who received Pell Grants were likely to borrow, and borrow more:

    • 88 percent of graduates who received Pell Grants had student loans in 2012, with an average balance of $31,200
    • 53 percent of those who didn’t receive a Pell Grant had student loan debt and borrowed $4,750 less ($26,450)

    Private student loan debt statistics

    • Private student loan debt is on the rise; $6.2 billion was borrowed in 2012-2013, up from $5.5 billion in 2011-2012
    • From 2011-2012, borrowers didn’t take advantage of federal student loans as much as they could have: 19 percent didn’t take out Stafford loans, 8 percent didn’t apply for federal financial aid, 11 percent applied for federal aid but didn’t take out a Stafford loan, 28 percent had Stafford loans but borrowed less than they were eligible for
    • In 2011-2012, 48 percent of private loan borrowers attended schools that had tuition costs of $10,000 or less
    • Nearly 1.4 million undergraduates borrowed private loans in 2011-2012

    Graduate student loan debt

    About 40 percent of the $1 trillion student loan debt was used to finance graduate and professional degrees.

    Combined undergraduate and graduate debt by degree:

    • MBA = $42,000 (11% of graduate degrees)
    • Master of Education = $50,879 (16%)
    • Master of Science = $50,400 (18%)
    • Master of Arts = $58,539 (8%)
    • Law = $140,616 (4%)
    • Medicine and health sciences = $161,772 (5%)

    Clearly, as these student loan debt statistics show, the cost of attending college is becoming a growing burden for a huge portion of Americans.

    What are you doing to pay off your debt and ensure you aren’t another statistic? Be sure to let us know how we can help.


    Student loan debt: Why employers may want to help pay off college loans, help with student loan debt.#Help #with #student #loan #debt


    Here s why employers may want to help out on the mountain of student loan debt

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    Employers eager to recruit and retain skilled workers in a tight labor market have about 1.34 trillion reasons to expand their benefits package to include assistance in helping employees repay their student loans.

    That’s the mountain of student loan debt being carried on the financial shoulders of 44 million Americans. And no surprise, the bulk of those would indeed love for the boss to kick in and help pay it back.

    More than 80 percent of workers with student loans surveyed by IonTuition said they would like to work for a company that provides a student loan repayment benefit. IonTuition, a fintech company focused on services to help borrowers manage their repayments, mostly surveyed millennials.

    Yet there is plenty of reason to suspect older workers would be eager for the perk, too. According to Federal Reserve data, borrowers at least 40 years old have a not-small $450 billion in student loans to pay off. A big part of that older cohort are parents who borrowed through the federal PLUS program or took out private student loans.

    The benefit is still clearly in the early adopter stage with just 3 percent of firms surveyed by AonHewitt currently offering student loan repayment assistance. AonHewitt says an additional 5 percent of surveyed companies say they are likely to add the benefit and 24 percent are moderately interested in adding the benefit.

    “Employers are incredibly curious and engaged around the issue given all the news about student loan debt,” said Balaji “Raj” Rajan , chief executive officer of IonTuition. He said IonTuition fields two or three inquiries a day from companies interested in adding student loan repayment assistance.

    A few big old-line firms including Aetna, Fidelity, PwC and Penguin Random House have begun to contribute to employees’ loan payments. Earlier this summer, the city of Memphis, Tennessee, announced it will contribute $50 a month toward employees’ student loan repayment.

    Adoption of the benefit is more common among smaller and mid-size companies with nimbler decision trees and the need to position benefits as a competitive edge in recruiting, according to Meera Oliva, chief marketing officer at Gradifi, a subsidiary of First Republic that provides a student loan benefit platform for employers, including PwC and Penguin Random House.

    Gradifi has more than 140 employer clients offering repayment assistance and is adding a half dozen or more monthly. “The bulk of our business is companies coming to us, not the other way around,” Oliva said.

    An employer contribution of $50 or $100 a month is common among the first movers. That can indeed be a big help, as IonTuition reports that about three-quarters of borrowers make monthly payments of $300 or less.

    Employer contributions go toward principal repayment. Gradifi’s website includes a free tool for employees to see how an employer assist can aid employee financial wellness. For instance, someone aiming to pay off $35,000 in debt over 10 years might be able to shave off 2.5 years and save some serious coin in the process:

    Help with student loan debt

    Waiting on Washington

    Chris Walters, chief executive officer of Gradfin, another student loan repayment and management tech platform, said the tax code is keeping plenty of interested employers on the sidelines.

    “If an employer contributes $100 a month toward student loan repayment, it costs $107.65 a month because it is treated as compensation and requires paying the employer share of the payroll tax,” Walters said.

    Moreover, the benefit is taxable to the employee as compensation.

    “It’s going to take a change in the tax code to see large growth in the benefit,” he said.

    More from College Game Plan

    These states have the worst student debt

    Bipartisan bills in the House and Senate would put student loan repayment assistance on par with employer tuition assistance, which currently allows employers to give employees up to $5,250 a year tax-free for tuition costs.

    The cost of that tax break likely makes for some tough sledding in this current Congress. Walters says that’s missing the bigger picture.

    “The federal government, meaning taxpayers, are already losing plenty in terms of defaulted student loans, and income-based plans that will be forgiven,” he said.

    “Congress should be worried about those losses. If the private sector comes in and improves debt repayment the Federal government is going to get paid more.”

    (Correction: This story has been updated to correct the spelling of Balaji “Raj” Rajan.)


    Private Student Loans, FinAid, Loans, student loan application.#Student #loan #application


    Private Student Loans

    Private student loan volume grows when federal student loan limits remain stagnant.

    Private student loan volume grew much more rapidly than federal student loan volume through mid-2008, in part because aggregate loan limits on the Stafford loan remained unchanged from 1992 to 2008. (The introduction of the Grad PLUS loan on July 1, 2006 and the increases in the annual but not aggregate limits had only a modest impact on the growth of private student loan volume. The subprime mortgage credit crisis of 2007-2010, however, limited lender access to the capital needed to make new loans, reining in growth of the private student loan marketplace.) The annual increase in private student loan volume was about 25% to 35% per year, compared with 8% per year for federal loan volume.

    In addition to these lists of private student loan programs, there are several web sites that provide tools for comparing private student loans. These tools can help you identify the loans that match your criteria. These student loan comparison sites include Credible and other student loan comparison sites.

    Then the Ensuring Continued Access to Student Loans Act of 2008 increased the annual and aggregate loan limits on the federal Stafford loan starting July 1, 2008. This shifted significant loan volume from private student loan programs to federal. Private student loan volume dropped in half in 2008-09, according to the College Board’s Trends in Student Aid 2009.

    Private student loan volume is expected to return to the 25% annual growth rate unless there is another increase in federal loan limits or an expansion of the availability of federal student loans. For example, the proposal for expanding Perkins loan funding from $1 billion a year to $8.5 billion a year will cause a significant decline in private student loan volume. But so long as federal loan limits do not increase every year, private student loan volume will continue to grow at double-digit rates.

    If current trends continue, annual private education loan volume will surpass federal student loan volume by around 2030. Accordingly, it is important that students have tools they can use to compare different private student loans.

    As a general rule, students should only consider obtaining a private education loan if they have maxed out the Federal Stafford Loan. They should also file the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which may qualify them for grants, work-study and other forms of student aid. Undergraduate students should also compare costs with the Federal PLUS Loan, as the PLUS loan is usually much less expensive and has better repayment terms.

    The fees charged by some lenders can significantly increase the cost of the loan. A loan with a relatively low interest rate but high fees can ultimately cost more than a loan with a somewhat higher interest rate and no fees. (The lenders that do not charge fees often roll the difference into the interest rate.) A good rule of thumb is that 3% to 4% in fees is about the same as a 1% higher interest rate.

    Be wary of comparing loans with different repayment terms according to APR, as a longer loan term reduces the APR despite increasing the total amount of interest paid. FinAid’s Loan Analyzer Calculator may be used to generate an apples-to-apples comparison of different loan programs.

    The best private student loans will have interest rates of LIBOR + 2.0% or PRIME – 0.50% with no fees. Such loans will be competitive with the Federal PLUS Loan. Unfortunately, these rates often will be available only to borrowers with great credit who also have a creditworthy cosigner. It is unclear how many borrowers qualify for the best rates, although the top credit tier typically encompasses about 20% of borrowers.

    Generally, borrowers should prefer loans that are pegged to the LIBOR index over loans that are pegged to the Prime Lending Rate, all else being equal, as the spread between the Prime Lending Rate and LIBOR has been increasing over time. Over the long term a loan with interest rates based on LIBOR will be less expensive than a loan based on the Prime Lending Rate. About half of lenders peg their private student loans to the LIBOR index and about 2/5 to the Prime lending rate.

    Some lenders use the LIBOR rate because it reflects their cost of capital. Other lenders use the Prime Lending Rate because PRIME + 0.0% sounds better to consumers than LIBOR + 2.80% even when the rates are the same.

    It is not uncommon for lenders to advertise a lower rate for the in-school and grace period, with a higher rate in effect when the loan enters repayment.

    Federal student loans are not available for expenses incurred by law, medical and dental students after they graduate, such as expenses associated with study for the bar or finding a residency. There are two types of private student loans for these expenses:

    • A Bar Study Loan helps finance bar exam costs such as bar review course fees, bar exam fees, as well as living expenses while you are studying for the bar.
    • A Residency and Relocation Loan helps medical and dental students with the expenses associated with finding a residency, including interview travel expenses and relocation costs, as well as board exam expenses.

    Comparing Private Student Loans

    Key information to understand student loans includes being aware of the annual and cumulative loan limits, interest rates, fees, and loan term for the most popular private student loan programs. Often the interest rates, fees and loan limits depend on the credit history of the borrower and co-signer, if any, and on loan options chosen by the borrower such as in-school deferment and repayment schedule. Loan term often depends on the total amount of debt.

    Most lenders that require school certification (approval) will cap the annual loan amount at cost of education less aid received (COA-Aid). They may also have an annual dollar limit as well.

    Lenders rarely give complete details of the terms of the private student loan until after the student submits an application, in part because this helps prevent comparisons based on cost. For example, many lenders will only advertise the lowest interest rate they charge (for good credit borrowers). Borrowers with bad credit can expect interest rates that are as much as 6% higher, loan fees that are as much as 9% higher, and loan limits that are two-thirds lower than the advertised figures.

    The APRs for variable rate loans, if listed, are only the current APRs and are likely to change over the term of the loan. Borrowers should be careful about comparing loans based on the APR, as the APR may be calculated under different assumptions, such as a different number of years in repayment. All else being equal, a longer repayment term will have a lower APR even though the borrower will pay more in interest.

    The information presented below is based on lender provided information. Actual rates and fees may differ.