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Moving Truck Rental Warning. 3 Tips To Protect Yourself When Renting Trucks For Your Move.? ) Video

#Moving #Truck #Rental #Warning. #3 #Tips #To #Protect #Yourself #When #Renting #Trucks #For #Your #Move.

Moving Truck Rental Warning. 3 Tips To Protect Yourself When Renting Trucks For Your Move., NEF6.COM


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Moving Truck Rental Warning. 3 Tips To Protect Yourself When Renting Trucks For Your Move.


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5 Warning Signs of a Bad Credit Card – US News #student #loans #rates


#bad credit cards
#

5 Warning Signs of a Bad Credit Card

Don’t be duped by a horrible offer.

It doesn’t take much effort to find dozens or even hundreds of credit card offers. All you have to do is visit the websites of the largest credit card issuers, such as JP Morgan Chase, Citibank and Bank of America. Add to that the Visas and MasterCards available from major retailers, hotel chains and airlines, and it’s easy to find yourself awash in offers.

Naturally, some offers are better than others. It’s often tricky to determine what the best offer is, but there are a few warning signs of an offer that’s not as good as others. Here are five clear signs of a credit card you should skip right past.

No bonus rewards. Reward programs are common features of credit cards. They offer you some form of reward or rebate for purchases made on the cards.

Reward credit cards come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Some provide discounts at specific retailers. For example, the Target Visa gives you 5 percent off on all purchases at Target. Various gas station chains offer as much as 25 cents per gallon in rebates when you use their particular Visa or MasterCard to buy gas. Other cards offer points that can be used in various ways. Some hotel chains, for instance, offer cards that generate points with each purchase and can be exchanged for a free night of lodging at one of the hotels in that chain.

If you’re smart, a good rewards program can easily help you save on everyday purchases. There are multitudes of cards out there that offer at least some kind of rewards program, so there’s no reason to accept a card that offers you nothing in return for using it.

High APR. If you carry a balance on your card from month to month, you’re going to face interest charges. The higher the APR on your card, the more interest you’re going to pay each month on a particular balance.

Let’s say you have a 19.9 percent APR on a card with a $1,000 balance, and your monthly minimum payment is 4 percent of your balance. In that case, to pay off the card, you’ll pay $40 a month, but it will take 73 months. You’ll also end up paying a total of $1,556, which translates to an extra $556 in interest.

If you simply reduce the interest rate to 9.9 percent APR (and leave the other factors the same – a $1,000 balance and a 4 percent monthly payment), things change quickly. You’ll still pay $40 a month, but you’ll end up paying off the card in 58 months. Your total payment will be $1,209.11 – only $209.11 paid in interest.

Therefore, if you carry a balance, a high APR is something to avoid because a lower APR will directly save you money. (Of course, it’s better to simply not carry a balance.)

Low credit limit. Each credit card offer comes with a credit limit that indicates the maximum amount of credit you can use on that card. While it’s rarely a good idea to use a card up to the credit limit, there are times when that flexibility can help.

For example, if you’re going to make a major purchase like a laptop, it’s nice to have the consumer protection that a Visa or MasterCard offers, but if your credit limit is too low, you can’t simply buy it with a swipe of the card.

A higher limit can also help improve your credit score, since scores factor in credit card utilization rates (the ratio of your balances to credit limits).

The bottom line: If your card offer limits your credit to $250 or $500, look elsewhere.

High fees and penalties. Credit card companies make a lot of money from fees. Fees for balance transfers, cash advances, cash withdrawals from ATMs, payment by phone, online payments – if there’s a way to charge you, they will.

That’s why it pays to look at the fine print. If you find that a card will charge you fees for all of these things – particularly for things you are likely to do, like transferring balances – skip it and move on to the next offer.

Variable interest rates. This is a particularly pernicious trick that some credit card companies like to use. They’ll advertise a very low initial rate, but it turns out that it’s a variable rate they can change at will. Trust me, they will change it, and it will cost you.

You should look for fixed-interest rate cards, even if they’re a bit higher than variable rate cards. Still, be careful – there are situations when companies can change the rate on a fixed rate card. Be aware of those situations by reading the documentation that comes with your card.

If you avoid these five warning signs of a bad credit card, you’ll wind up with a card that’s right for you .



5 Warning Signs of a Bad Credit Card – US News #private #student #loans #without #cosigner


#bad credit cards
#

5 Warning Signs of a Bad Credit Card

Don’t be duped by a horrible offer.

It doesn’t take much effort to find dozens or even hundreds of credit card offers. All you have to do is visit the websites of the largest credit card issuers, such as JP Morgan Chase, Citibank and Bank of America. Add to that the Visas and MasterCards available from major retailers, hotel chains and airlines, and it’s easy to find yourself awash in offers.

Naturally, some offers are better than others. It’s often tricky to determine what the best offer is, but there are a few warning signs of an offer that’s not as good as others. Here are five clear signs of a credit card you should skip right past.

No bonus rewards. Reward programs are common features of credit cards. They offer you some form of reward or rebate for purchases made on the cards.

Reward credit cards come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Some provide discounts at specific retailers. For example, the Target Visa gives you 5 percent off on all purchases at Target. Various gas station chains offer as much as 25 cents per gallon in rebates when you use their particular Visa or MasterCard to buy gas. Other cards offer points that can be used in various ways. Some hotel chains, for instance, offer cards that generate points with each purchase and can be exchanged for a free night of lodging at one of the hotels in that chain.

If you’re smart, a good rewards program can easily help you save on everyday purchases. There are multitudes of cards out there that offer at least some kind of rewards program, so there’s no reason to accept a card that offers you nothing in return for using it.

High APR. If you carry a balance on your card from month to month, you’re going to face interest charges. The higher the APR on your card, the more interest you’re going to pay each month on a particular balance.

Let’s say you have a 19.9 percent APR on a card with a $1,000 balance, and your monthly minimum payment is 4 percent of your balance. In that case, to pay off the card, you’ll pay $40 a month, but it will take 73 months. You’ll also end up paying a total of $1,556, which translates to an extra $556 in interest.

If you simply reduce the interest rate to 9.9 percent APR (and leave the other factors the same – a $1,000 balance and a 4 percent monthly payment), things change quickly. You’ll still pay $40 a month, but you’ll end up paying off the card in 58 months. Your total payment will be $1,209.11 – only $209.11 paid in interest.

Therefore, if you carry a balance, a high APR is something to avoid because a lower APR will directly save you money. (Of course, it’s better to simply not carry a balance.)

Low credit limit. Each credit card offer comes with a credit limit that indicates the maximum amount of credit you can use on that card. While it’s rarely a good idea to use a card up to the credit limit, there are times when that flexibility can help.

For example, if you’re going to make a major purchase like a laptop, it’s nice to have the consumer protection that a Visa or MasterCard offers, but if your credit limit is too low, you can’t simply buy it with a swipe of the card.

A higher limit can also help improve your credit score, since scores factor in credit card utilization rates (the ratio of your balances to credit limits).

The bottom line: If your card offer limits your credit to $250 or $500, look elsewhere.

High fees and penalties. Credit card companies make a lot of money from fees. Fees for balance transfers, cash advances, cash withdrawals from ATMs, payment by phone, online payments – if there’s a way to charge you, they will.

That’s why it pays to look at the fine print. If you find that a card will charge you fees for all of these things – particularly for things you are likely to do, like transferring balances – skip it and move on to the next offer.

Variable interest rates. This is a particularly pernicious trick that some credit card companies like to use. They’ll advertise a very low initial rate, but it turns out that it’s a variable rate they can change at will. Trust me, they will change it, and it will cost you.

You should look for fixed-interest rate cards, even if they’re a bit higher than variable rate cards. Still, be careful – there are situations when companies can change the rate on a fixed rate card. Be aware of those situations by reading the documentation that comes with your card.

If you avoid these five warning signs of a bad credit card, you’ll wind up with a card that’s right for you .



Student Loans Company started taking money without warning seven years after I repaid my loan – Yahoo Finance UK #payday #loans #no #credit #check


#student loan rate
#

RELATED QUOTES

One former student has discovered money is being taken from her wages seven years after she cleared her loan

Major blunders by the Student Loans Company are continuing to disadvantage graduates, leaving them thousands of pounds out of pocket.

Telegraph Money has heard from a number of readers who have paid off their student loans but continue to have repayments deducted from their salary by the Student Loans Company, which administers and processes loans and bursaries.

Others complain that they want to pay off their debt but can never get an accurate balance. They are told that the most recent information available is the balance at the end of the previous tax year.

Now (NYSE: DNOW – news ). even more serious cases are coming to light where former students find money being suddenly deducted from their pay several years after their loan was cleared.

• How to shave thousands off your student loan

Mags Mulrine, 46, thought her days of paying off student debt were long gone. She (Munich: SOQ.MU – news ) retrained in her 30s to become a radiographer and accumulated around £8,000 of debt, which she started repaying immediately.

In 2008, the Student Loans Company informed her that she had finished paying off her loan. It (Other OTC: ITGL – news ) issued her with a £1,672 refund for overpayment and notified HMRC to stop taking money from her salary.

But in September this year, without any warning or explanation, the Student Loans Company started taking money again from Ms Mulrine’s salary.

When she noticed the payments last month, she contacted the firm. It confirmed that the account had been closed in 2008 and the loan marked as fully repaid. But it said that three years later, in 2011, it had discovered an accounting error. Apparently an amount supplied by HMRC from Ms Mulrine’s P60 was entered into the system twice by mistake, clearing the account and triggering the refund.

The Student Loans Company now claims she owes £1,879.

“I cannot believe that the Student Loans Company can just reopen an account and start taking money seven years down the line without any warning or explanation,” Ms Mulrine said. “They claimed they couldn’t locate me because I’ve moved house, but all they had to do was ask HMRC for my address or employer details. They clearly didn’t look very hard.”

Ms Mulrine doesn’t trust the Student Loans Company’s calculations and is concerned that it has added interest to her total for the last seven years.

“If I owe money I am happy to pay it, but I want to know where the £1,879 figure has come from and whether interest has been applied,” she said. “I’ve asked for statements showing the size of my original loan and the amount still outstanding, but the Student Loans Company has refused to provide this. I remember the total loan to be around £8,000 and I estimate that means I would have around £1,000 to pay. I don’t think I should be forced to pay interest as a result of their incompetence.”

Ms Mulrine spoke to the Financial Ombudsman, but it doesn’t have any jurisdiction over the Student Loans Company. “I feel like the Government has its own loan shark, which is not answerable to anyone.”

The Student Loans Company apologised for the error, but said it has a “duty to collect every penny of taxpayer monies owed”. It promised to send a full statement showing a breakdown of her remaining debt.

“Ms Mulrine will not be liable for any interest that has accrued since she was notified that her balance had been cleared,” a spokesman added.

• Student loans are tough to clear even when you’ve got the cash

• Student loans: the real cost could be £40,000 more than official estimates

In June, Telegraph Money wrote about graduate Lauren Smith’s year-long battle to stop the Student Loans Company from docking her salary after her £22,700 student debt was repaid in full.

She repeatedly asked the firm to stop taking payments and to refund the excess, but her requests were ignored and an extra £1,800 in excess payments was taken from her wages.

When former students finish paying off their loan, the Student Loans Company is supposed to send a “stop notification” to HMRC informing it that no more payments are to be taken. The taxman automatically passes this information on to employers, which stop deducting payments from employees’ wages.

Only after this newspaper became involved did Miss Smith’s employer receive a stop notification. The Student Loans Company refunded the overpayment, along with 1.5pc interest.

• The best of Telegraph Money: get our weekly newsletter



Citizens Advice warning over legal logbook loans – BBC Newsbeat #car #payment #calc


#log book loan
#

Citizens Advice warning over legal logbook loans

16/10/14

The Citizens Advice service is warning people about taking out high-cost credit such as logbook loans, in which a vehicle is used as security.

Under current laws a logbook loan is attached to the vehicle, not the person who has taken out the credit.

Citizens Advice says the number being taken out rose by 35% between 2011 and 2013.

Even if you didn’t take out the cash yourself, you could still get into trouble for not repaying it.

Newsbeat has been given exclusive figures which show nearly two thirds of young people who called Citizens Advice “in serious debt” had turned to a form of high-cost credit.

‘I was seeing red’

Paul Brewin, 25, bought his car for £1,000.

“As soon as I saw it I fell in love instantly,” he told Newsbeat. “It was exactly what I was looking for.”

He took out a vehicle history check which can identify if there is any outstanding finance, or if the car has ever been stolen, written off or clocked.

Some, like the HPI Check, include a guarantee, valuation and mileage information too.

“I did a check that cost around £3,” he said. “It said the car was clear.”

There are different types of vehicle history checks you can make. Some are cheaper than others and don’t always pick up on all types of finance.

Paul says a few weeks after buying the car a logbook loan company got in touch.

He said: “I got a few letters come through the door saying, ‘We’ve come today looking for this vehicle or payment’.

“I was seeing red. I had steam coming out of my ears.

“I’ve gone and paid for a car and I’m now being told it’s not mine.”

The car wasn’t his because the previous owner had taken out a logbook loan, which allows drivers to borrow money against the value of their vehicle.

A logbook loan is similar to a payday loan and both are advertised online offering fast cash, with few credit checks.

A logbook loan has a typical APR of around 400%.

A Freedom of Information request to the HM Courts and Tribunals Service in 2011 by The Citizens Advice Bureau found there were 36,829 Logbook loans sold.

In 2013 this went up to 49,745.

The Bureau says it expects this to go up further in 2014.

Video caption Citizens Advice Logbook loans advice

James Plunkett is head of consumer research and campaigns for Citizens Advice.

“One of the worries about these forms of credit is you get locked into a cycle,” he said. “People are taking out more loans to pay off their old ones.

“Over time because the interest is so high on these loans they really add up.”

These logbook loans are just one of a number of different high-cost credit loans citizens advice are warning people about.

They analysed 3,000 calls they received from 17 to 24-year-olds between July and September 2013.

Each was classed as in “serious debt” because they had more than one loan.

Of these, two-thirds said they needed help after taking out high interest credit.



5 Warning Signs of a Bad Credit Card – US News


#bad credit cards
#

5 Warning Signs of a Bad Credit Card

Don’t be duped by a horrible offer.

It doesn’t take much effort to find dozens or even hundreds of credit card offers. All you have to do is visit the websites of the largest credit card issuers, such as JP Morgan Chase, Citibank and Bank of America. Add to that the Visas and MasterCards available from major retailers, hotel chains and airlines, and it’s easy to find yourself awash in offers.

Naturally, some offers are better than others. It’s often tricky to determine what the best offer is, but there are a few warning signs of an offer that’s not as good as others. Here are five clear signs of a credit card you should skip right past.

No bonus rewards. Reward programs are common features of credit cards. They offer you some form of reward or rebate for purchases made on the cards.

Reward credit cards come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Some provide discounts at specific retailers. For example, the Target Visa gives you 5 percent off on all purchases at Target. Various gas station chains offer as much as 25 cents per gallon in rebates when you use their particular Visa or MasterCard to buy gas. Other cards offer points that can be used in various ways. Some hotel chains, for instance, offer cards that generate points with each purchase and can be exchanged for a free night of lodging at one of the hotels in that chain.

If you’re smart, a good rewards program can easily help you save on everyday purchases. There are multitudes of cards out there that offer at least some kind of rewards program, so there’s no reason to accept a card that offers you nothing in return for using it.

High APR. If you carry a balance on your card from month to month, you’re going to face interest charges. The higher the APR on your card, the more interest you’re going to pay each month on a particular balance.

Let’s say you have a 19.9 percent APR on a card with a $1,000 balance, and your monthly minimum payment is 4 percent of your balance. In that case, to pay off the card, you’ll pay $40 a month, but it will take 73 months. You’ll also end up paying a total of $1,556, which translates to an extra $556 in interest.

If you simply reduce the interest rate to 9.9 percent APR (and leave the other factors the same – a $1,000 balance and a 4 percent monthly payment), things change quickly. You’ll still pay $40 a month, but you’ll end up paying off the card in 58 months. Your total payment will be $1,209.11 – only $209.11 paid in interest.

Therefore, if you carry a balance, a high APR is something to avoid because a lower APR will directly save you money. (Of course, it’s better to simply not carry a balance.)

Low credit limit. Each credit card offer comes with a credit limit that indicates the maximum amount of credit you can use on that card. While it’s rarely a good idea to use a card up to the credit limit, there are times when that flexibility can help.

For example, if you’re going to make a major purchase like a laptop, it’s nice to have the consumer protection that a Visa or MasterCard offers, but if your credit limit is too low, you can’t simply buy it with a swipe of the card.

A higher limit can also help improve your credit score, since scores factor in credit card utilization rates (the ratio of your balances to credit limits).

The bottom line: If your card offer limits your credit to $250 or $500, look elsewhere.

High fees and penalties. Credit card companies make a lot of money from fees. Fees for balance transfers, cash advances, cash withdrawals from ATMs, payment by phone, online payments – if there’s a way to charge you, they will.

That’s why it pays to look at the fine print. If you find that a card will charge you fees for all of these things – particularly for things you are likely to do, like transferring balances – skip it and move on to the next offer.

Variable interest rates. This is a particularly pernicious trick that some credit card companies like to use. They’ll advertise a very low initial rate, but it turns out that it’s a variable rate they can change at will. Trust me, they will change it, and it will cost you.

You should look for fixed-interest rate cards, even if they’re a bit higher than variable rate cards. Still, be careful – there are situations when companies can change the rate on a fixed rate card. Be aware of those situations by reading the documentation that comes with your card.

If you avoid these five warning signs of a bad credit card, you’ll wind up with a card that’s right for you .