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What’s the best way to finance buying a car? Money Advice Service #financial #loans


#cheapest car loan
#

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Buying a car is no simple decision. From buying outright, to buying a car on finance, there are many options. You also have to consider running costs. In fact, it’s probably the second most expensive thing you’ll buy after a home. So it’s important to make sure you get the best deal on financing.

Cash or savings?

When interest rates are so low, it’s likely that your savings will not be earning much in a bank or building society account. So rather than keeping your savings and borrowing at a higher rate of interest, you could use them to fund all or some of the cost of the car.

  • You should make sure you have enough savings left over for an emergency after you have paid for your car.
  • If you don’t have enough savings to buy the car outright, you could use them to give you the biggest deposit possible.
  • Even if you use money from your savings you may be better off buying the car on your credit card so you benefit from credit card purchase protection. You should pay the bill off in full the next month.

Use our Car costs calculator to work out the total cost of motoring.

Personal loan

Did you know?

Personal loans are usually the cheapest way to finance a car deal, but only if you have a good credit rating.

You can get a personal loan from a bank, building society or finance provider so long as your credit rating is good.

Make sure the loan is not secured against your home. Otherwise you will be putting your home at risk if you failed to keep up with repayments.

Shop around for the best interest rate by comparing the APR (or annual percentage rate, which includes charges you have to pay as well as the interest).

Pros

    It can be arranged over the phone, internet or face-to-face Covers the whole cost of the car but it doesn’t have to Can charge a competitive fixed interest rate if you shop around

Cons

    There may be a wait for the funds to appear, although some lenders make funds available almost immediately Other borrowing may be affected

Hire purchase (HP)

Hire purchase is a form of buying a car on finance and is paid in instalments where payments are spread over 12-60 months and you usually (but not always) have to put down a 10% deposit. They are arranged by the car dealer and are often very competitive for new cars (less so for used cars). The loan is secured against the car, so you don’t own it until the last payment is made.

Pros

    Quick and easy to arrange Low deposit (usually 10%) Flexible repayment terms (from 12 to 60 months) Competitive fixed interest rates

Cons

    You don’t own the car until the final payment Tends to be more expensive for short-term agreements

Personal contract plan

This type of car finance deal is a variation on hire purchase and tends to result in lower monthly payments. Instead of paying for the car outright, you agree to pay the difference between its sale price and its price for resale back to the dealer. This is based on a forecast of annual mileage over the term of the agreement. Payments are spread over a shorter term of 12 to 36 months.

At the end of the term you can:

Personal leasing

You can pay the dealer a fixed monthly amount for the use of a car, with servicing and maintenance included, as long as the mileage doesn’t exceed a specified limit. At the end of the agreement, you hand the car back. It never belongs to you.

Pros

    Motoring at a fixed monthly cost No worries about the car depreciating in value Flexible payment terms (from 12 to 36 months)

Cons

    Monthly costs are higher because servicing and maintenance are included Need to find a deposit (usually 3 months rental) Possible extra costs if you exceed the mileage limit The car is never yours

Car finance options – Things to look out for

As you compare car financing, there are a few key things to do before making a final choice.

  • Make sure you can afford the monthly payment.
  • Make sure you compare interest rates by looking at the APR (annual percentage rate), which includes all the charges you have to pay. Remember that a higher deposit will normally mean a lower interest rate.
  • Compare the total cost of borrowing, including all charges over the loan.
  • Think carefully before buying payment protection insurance (PPI) or other insurance, such as GAP cover, which can be expensive and may give limited cover. GAP cover is designed to pay out if your car is a total write-off and the outstanding finance is more than the value of your car.
  • Beware of early repayment or other charges, which kick in if you exceed the forecast mileage in personal contract plans (and also personal leasing).

Shop around

The best way to shop around for a good deal is to use an online comparison site. Here are some of the sites you might want to consider.


What’s the best way to finance buying a car? Money Advice Service #loans #bad #credit


#cheapest car loan
#

200,000 people are taking care of their money with our FREE money advice newsletter.

Send me money advice

Don t worry, we won t share your details. See our privacy policy.

Buying a car is no simple decision. From buying outright, to buying a car on finance, there are many options. You also have to consider running costs. In fact, it’s probably the second most expensive thing you’ll buy after a home. So it’s important to make sure you get the best deal on financing.

Cash or savings?

When interest rates are so low, it’s likely that your savings will not be earning much in a bank or building society account. So rather than keeping your savings and borrowing at a higher rate of interest, you could use them to fund all or some of the cost of the car.

  • You should make sure you have enough savings left over for an emergency after you have paid for your car.
  • If you don’t have enough savings to buy the car outright, you could use them to give you the biggest deposit possible.
  • Even if you use money from your savings you may be better off buying the car on your credit card so you benefit from credit card purchase protection. You should pay the bill off in full the next month.

Use our Car costs calculator to work out the total cost of motoring.

Personal loan

Did you know?

Personal loans are usually the cheapest way to finance a car deal, but only if you have a good credit rating.

You can get a personal loan from a bank, building society or finance provider so long as your credit rating is good.

Make sure the loan is not secured against your home. Otherwise you will be putting your home at risk if you failed to keep up with repayments.

Shop around for the best interest rate by comparing the APR (or annual percentage rate, which includes charges you have to pay as well as the interest).

Pros

    It can be arranged over the phone, internet or face-to-face Covers the whole cost of the car but it doesn’t have to Can charge a competitive fixed interest rate if you shop around

Cons

    There may be a wait for the funds to appear, although some lenders make funds available almost immediately Other borrowing may be affected

Hire purchase (HP)

Hire purchase is a form of buying a car on finance and is paid in instalments where payments are spread over 12-60 months and you usually (but not always) have to put down a 10% deposit. They are arranged by the car dealer and are often very competitive for new cars (less so for used cars). The loan is secured against the car, so you don’t own it until the last payment is made.

Pros

    Quick and easy to arrange Low deposit (usually 10%) Flexible repayment terms (from 12 to 60 months) Competitive fixed interest rates

Cons

    You don’t own the car until the final payment Tends to be more expensive for short-term agreements

Personal contract plan

This type of car finance deal is a variation on hire purchase and tends to result in lower monthly payments. Instead of paying for the car outright, you agree to pay the difference between its sale price and its price for resale back to the dealer. This is based on a forecast of annual mileage over the term of the agreement. Payments are spread over a shorter term of 12 to 36 months.

At the end of the term you can:

Personal leasing

You can pay the dealer a fixed monthly amount for the use of a car, with servicing and maintenance included, as long as the mileage doesn’t exceed a specified limit. At the end of the agreement, you hand the car back. It never belongs to you.

Pros

    Motoring at a fixed monthly cost No worries about the car depreciating in value Flexible payment terms (from 12 to 36 months)

Cons

    Monthly costs are higher because servicing and maintenance are included Need to find a deposit (usually 3 months rental) Possible extra costs if you exceed the mileage limit The car is never yours

Car finance options – Things to look out for

As you compare car financing, there are a few key things to do before making a final choice.

  • Make sure you can afford the monthly payment.
  • Make sure you compare interest rates by looking at the APR (annual percentage rate), which includes all the charges you have to pay. Remember that a higher deposit will normally mean a lower interest rate.
  • Compare the total cost of borrowing, including all charges over the loan.
  • Think carefully before buying payment protection insurance (PPI) or other insurance, such as GAP cover, which can be expensive and may give limited cover. GAP cover is designed to pay out if your car is a total write-off and the outstanding finance is more than the value of your car.
  • Beware of early repayment or other charges, which kick in if you exceed the forecast mileage in personal contract plans (and also personal leasing).

Shop around

The best way to shop around for a good deal is to use an online comparison site. Here are some of the sites you might want to consider.


Bad Credit Loans – What’s Available & How To Apply #land #loan #calculator


#getting a loan with bad credit
#

Guide to getting a loan with bad credit

If you have a muddied credit history it’s likely that you’ll find it tricky to get accepted by loan providers – so what are your options?

What constitutes bad credit?

If you’re considered to have ‘bad credit’, you may have missed repayments in the past, or even have a County Court Judgement (CCJ) or bankruptcy against your name.

There is a big difference between ‘bad credit’ and ‘no credit’ – the latter is when you haven’t ever taken on any form of loan and so have no credit history behind you.

However, a dose of bad credit doesn’t mean lenders will automatically slam the door on you – but it will mean your options are limited, with higher interest payments than you’d be subject to if you had a squeaky clean credit history, and access to smaller

Is it possible to improve your credit history?

There are simple ways to improve your credit score. These include making sure your name is on the electoral roll when your local authority sends you details of this. If it’s not on this, you’re unlikely to get any credit.

Also, space out your applications for credit as each will leave a ‘footprint’ on your file – and if you’re rejected, this makes the next lender less likely to accept you. When you do get credit, make sure you keep up repayments to gradually rebuild a tarnished credit history.

There is a big difference between ‘bad credit’ and ‘no credit’ – the latter is when you haven’t ever taken on any form of loan and so have no credit history behind you.

Types of loans you won’t get with bad credit

You won’t be able to apply for the best buy loans available, so those with the most attractive terms and rates. These are likely to be reserved for borrowers with clean credit histories.

Types of loans you’re likely to be approved for

However, there are lenders that offer ‘bad credit loans ‘ to people who seem a greater risk because of their poor credit history – although these tend to come with higher rates and lower limits.

The greater the risk you are perceived to be by the lender, the more interest you will pay and the greater the restrictions you’ll face. However, bear in mind that your credit history isn’t the only consideration when providers decide to lend you money. They also take into account your job, salary, stability and other assets you might have, such as a property.

Pros and Cons of high interest loans

While you might face hefty interest charges, taking on a high interest loan gives you the chance to rebuild your credit profile by demonstrating that you’re a trustworthy borrower. If you are willing to take a disciplined approach to repayments, this route could work for you.

When you are granted a bad credit loan and start paying it back you will be on the path to repairing your credit history.

However, the clear con is the high rate – so think carefully about whether you’re willing to accept this and can afford repayments before making an application.

Moneysupermarket is a credit broker this means we ll show you products offered by lenders. We never take a fee from customers for this broking service. Instead we are usually paid a fee by the lenders though the size of that payment doesn t affect how we show products to customers.


Bad Credit Loans – What’s Available & How To Apply #text #loans


#getting a loan with bad credit
#

Guide to getting a loan with bad credit

If you have a muddied credit history it’s likely that you’ll find it tricky to get accepted by loan providers – so what are your options?

What constitutes bad credit?

If you’re considered to have ‘bad credit’, you may have missed repayments in the past, or even have a County Court Judgement (CCJ) or bankruptcy against your name.

There is a big difference between ‘bad credit’ and ‘no credit’ – the latter is when you haven’t ever taken on any form of loan and so have no credit history behind you.

However, a dose of bad credit doesn’t mean lenders will automatically slam the door on you – but it will mean your options are limited, with higher interest payments than you’d be subject to if you had a squeaky clean credit history, and access to smaller

Is it possible to improve your credit history?

There are simple ways to improve your credit score. These include making sure your name is on the electoral roll when your local authority sends you details of this. If it’s not on this, you’re unlikely to get any credit.

Also, space out your applications for credit as each will leave a ‘footprint’ on your file – and if you’re rejected, this makes the next lender less likely to accept you. When you do get credit, make sure you keep up repayments to gradually rebuild a tarnished credit history.

There is a big difference between ‘bad credit’ and ‘no credit’ – the latter is when you haven’t ever taken on any form of loan and so have no credit history behind you.

Types of loans you won’t get with bad credit

You won’t be able to apply for the best buy loans available, so those with the most attractive terms and rates. These are likely to be reserved for borrowers with clean credit histories.

Types of loans you’re likely to be approved for

However, there are lenders that offer ‘bad credit loans ‘ to people who seem a greater risk because of their poor credit history – although these tend to come with higher rates and lower limits.

The greater the risk you are perceived to be by the lender, the more interest you will pay and the greater the restrictions you’ll face. However, bear in mind that your credit history isn’t the only consideration when providers decide to lend you money. They also take into account your job, salary, stability and other assets you might have, such as a property.

Pros and Cons of high interest loans

While you might face hefty interest charges, taking on a high interest loan gives you the chance to rebuild your credit profile by demonstrating that you’re a trustworthy borrower. If you are willing to take a disciplined approach to repayments, this route could work for you.

When you are granted a bad credit loan and start paying it back you will be on the path to repairing your credit history.

However, the clear con is the high rate – so think carefully about whether you’re willing to accept this and can afford repayments before making an application.

Moneysupermarket is a credit broker this means we ll show you products offered by lenders. We never take a fee from customers for this broking service. Instead we are usually paid a fee by the lenders though the size of that payment doesn t affect how we show products to customers.


What’s the best way to finance buying a car? Money Advice Service


#cheapest car loan
#

200,000 people are taking care of their money with our FREE money advice newsletter.

Send me money advice

Don t worry, we won t share your details. See our privacy policy.

Buying a car is no simple decision. From buying outright, to buying a car on finance, there are many options. You also have to consider running costs. In fact, it’s probably the second most expensive thing you’ll buy after a home. So it’s important to make sure you get the best deal on financing.

Cash or savings?

When interest rates are so low, it’s likely that your savings will not be earning much in a bank or building society account. So rather than keeping your savings and borrowing at a higher rate of interest, you could use them to fund all or some of the cost of the car.

  • You should make sure you have enough savings left over for an emergency after you have paid for your car.
  • If you don’t have enough savings to buy the car outright, you could use them to give you the biggest deposit possible.
  • Even if you use money from your savings you may be better off buying the car on your credit card so you benefit from credit card purchase protection. You should pay the bill off in full the next month.

Use our Car costs calculator to work out the total cost of motoring.

Personal loan

Did you know?

Personal loans are usually the cheapest way to finance a car deal, but only if you have a good credit rating.

You can get a personal loan from a bank, building society or finance provider so long as your credit rating is good.

Make sure the loan is not secured against your home. Otherwise you will be putting your home at risk if you failed to keep up with repayments.

Shop around for the best interest rate by comparing the APR (or annual percentage rate, which includes charges you have to pay as well as the interest).

Pros

    It can be arranged over the phone, internet or face-to-face Covers the whole cost of the car but it doesn’t have to Can charge a competitive fixed interest rate if you shop around

Cons

    There may be a wait for the funds to appear, although some lenders make funds available almost immediately Other borrowing may be affected

Hire purchase (HP)

Hire purchase is a form of buying a car on finance and is paid in instalments where payments are spread over 12-60 months and you usually (but not always) have to put down a 10% deposit. They are arranged by the car dealer and are often very competitive for new cars (less so for used cars). The loan is secured against the car, so you don’t own it until the last payment is made.

Pros

    Quick and easy to arrange Low deposit (usually 10%) Flexible repayment terms (from 12 to 60 months) Competitive fixed interest rates

Cons

    You don’t own the car until the final payment Tends to be more expensive for short-term agreements

Personal contract plan

This type of car finance deal is a variation on hire purchase and tends to result in lower monthly payments. Instead of paying for the car outright, you agree to pay the difference between its sale price and its price for resale back to the dealer. This is based on a forecast of annual mileage over the term of the agreement. Payments are spread over a shorter term of 12 to 36 months.

At the end of the term you can:

Personal leasing

You can pay the dealer a fixed monthly amount for the use of a car, with servicing and maintenance included, as long as the mileage doesn’t exceed a specified limit. At the end of the agreement, you hand the car back. It never belongs to you.

Pros

    Motoring at a fixed monthly cost No worries about the car depreciating in value Flexible payment terms (from 12 to 36 months)

Cons

    Monthly costs are higher because servicing and maintenance are included Need to find a deposit (usually 3 months rental) Possible extra costs if you exceed the mileage limit The car is never yours

Car finance options – Things to look out for

As you compare car financing, there are a few key things to do before making a final choice.

  • Make sure you can afford the monthly payment.
  • Make sure you compare interest rates by looking at the APR (annual percentage rate), which includes all the charges you have to pay. Remember that a higher deposit will normally mean a lower interest rate.
  • Compare the total cost of borrowing, including all charges over the loan.
  • Think carefully before buying payment protection insurance (PPI) or other insurance, such as GAP cover, which can be expensive and may give limited cover. GAP cover is designed to pay out if your car is a total write-off and the outstanding finance is more than the value of your car.
  • Beware of early repayment or other charges, which kick in if you exceed the forecast mileage in personal contract plans (and also personal leasing).

Shop around

The best way to shop around for a good deal is to use an online comparison site. Here are some of the sites you might want to consider.